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By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
For decades Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Maryland has won deep allegiance from unions, corporations and state and local governments, who used the company to provide medical insurance for legions of workers.But today, that loyalty -- dating to the company's founding in 1920 -- is being severely tested as those huge groups learn they have the muscle to force insurance companies to sharply lower prices.Just last week, for instance, about two dozen health insurers submitted a bid to strip the Blues of the right to provide coverage to nearly 200,000 current and retired state workers and their families.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Under Armour has overtaken Adidas this year in combined apparel and footwear sales to become the second biggest sports brand in the United States. Baltimore-based Under Armour had U.S. apparel and footwear sales of $1.2 billion through the end of August, edging ahead of Adidas with $1.1 billion total U.S. sales, according to a Sterne Agee report citing sales figures from SportScanInfo. Under Armour sales have jumped 20 percent this year, while Adidas combined sales have plummeted 23 percent.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
The port of Baltimore ended 1992 on an upbeat note, registering its first gain in market share in five years and its first profitable fiscal year since 1988.Despite sharp declines in steel exports, total cargo handled at state-owned piers rose slightly during 1992, giving the port its second straight year of increases, according to figures released yesterday by the Maryland Port Commission.Also yesterday, The Maryland Port Administration said it finished fiscal year 1992, which ended June 30, in the black, with $1.4 million in net operating income.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | November 14, 2012
Just last month, I wrote about how Vocus Inc., a Beltsville-based digital marketing technology firm, was hiring hundreds of people this year and next year as it sought to increase its share of the social meda/PR/marketing industry. The firm's CEO and cofounder, Rick Rudman, was understandably bullish in the article about his company's prospects, as they ramp up in their investments to gain market share. Now, Rudman has put his own money on the line, too. He recently purchased 70,000 shares of Vocus stock -- or more than $1 million worth -- to add to the 715,000 shares he owns.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | May 6, 1992
Cargo handled at state-owned piers declined 3 percent, to less than 1.3 million tons, during the first three months of the year, the Maryland Port Administration reported yesterday.Despite the decline, state port officials remained convinced that Baltimore has become more competitive with other ports, and they predicted that tonnage will increase this year.jTC Much of that confidence comes from statistics showing that for the first time in years, Baltimore's share of the market is growing compared with those of three competing ports, Hampton Roads, Va., Philadelphia and New York.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2003
Columbia Bancorp will continue to gain market share in its home market despite heightened competition and might make additional acquisitions, executives of the Columbia-based banking company told investors at the company's annual meeting yesterday. During the 15 years it has been open, the bank has survived changes and challenges to become one of the dominant companies in the wealthy Howard County market. Chief Executive Officer John M. Bond Jr. said he expects the bank to continue its market-share gains.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
Atlanfed Bancorp Inc. of Baltimore has signed a letter of inten to pay $3.8 million for Capital Bankshares Inc., the Timonium parent of Capital Savings Bank.Atlanfed, parent of Atlantic Federal Savings Bank, will pay $13.50 a share for Capital's more than 281,000 shares, according to Michael P. Gavin, president of Atlantic Federal and executive vice president of Atlanfed.Capital has four branches in the Baltimore area and about $62 million in assets, according to Mr. Gavin. The company earned $484,000 in the fiscal year that ended June 30."
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
A survey conducted by MNC Financial Inc. shows that the state's biggest banking company suffered a mild erosion in market share among medium-sized business customers through 1991 but retained its dominant position in the Baltimore-Washington area despite financial problems.The survey included nine regional banking companies that were used by companies with $5 million to $50 million in annual sales.It was the first indication of how well the area's banks have done in retaining the middle-market companies that make up the bulk of the region's corporate banking customers.
BUSINESS
By Galina Vainblat and Galina Vainblat,New York Bureau | July 6, 1993
NEW YORK -- It may leave men's faces silky smooth, but Gillette's new razor has hit some rough patches on Wall Street.At a glitzy unveiling last week in the Rainbow Room at Rockefeller Center, Gillette Co. announced the arrival of its new SensorExcel. The company said the high-tech razor would help them improve their already strong market share and keep a step ahead of the competition.But stock analysts have questioned the need for the new razor. Although they think Gillette's stock price and market share are headed up, many doubt that the SensorExcel will contribute much to this movement.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr. and John H. Gormley Jr.,Staff Writer | May 6, 1992
Cargo handled at state-owned piers declined 3 percent, to less than 1.3 million tons, during the first three months of the year, the Maryland Port Administration reported yesterday.Despite the decline, state port officials remained convinced that Baltimore has become more competitive with other ports, and they predicted that tonnage will increase this year.Much of that confidence comes from statistics showing that for the first time in years, Baltimore's share of the market is growing compared with those of three competing ports, Hampton Roads, Va., Philadelphia and New York.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Vocus Inc. is hiring hundreds of people, betting big that it will become a leading digital marketing firm for small and medium-sized businesses. The Beltsville-based technology company is on track to hire around 500 people this year at its headquarters and other locations. And it intends to hire at least 200 more next year, company officials said. Vocus CEO Rick Rudman calls online and social media marketing a multi-billion-dollar opportunity, as businesses shift spending from traditional media, such as television and print, to digital.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2012
Giant Food's newest Baltimore-area store offers a glimpse of the future for the region's dominant grocer, when shoppers increasingly rely on technology, demand more organic foods and expect a wide selection of prepared meals. Giant, which has been steadily launching new locations, remodeling older supermarkets and acquiring competitors' closed outlets, is set to open its newest store Friday in Perry Hall. Not just another supermarket, the store is expected to serve as a prototype for future Giants, including several that will be part of mixed-use developments in Washington, said Jamie Miller, a Giant spokesman.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
Your editorial "A sad 'Kodak' moment" of Jan. 21 clearly identified the problem that resulted in Kodak's bankruptcy as a lack of vision by the executives. As you pointed out, it's ironic that Kodak invented digital photography in 1976 but didn't move forward aggressively. Kodak's failure to capitalize on a technology that it invented is not the first example of an American company lacking the vision to fully develop products into marketable items. Ampex invented video recording only to see foreign companies such as Sony move the technology forward and capture the major share of the market while Ampex disappeared.
NEWS
January 20, 2012
The bankruptcy filing of Eastman Kodak Company this week marked the end of a chapter in American manufacturing history. The venerable corporation that gave the world the Brownie camera and the slogan "You push the button, we do the rest" once dominated the photographic world with its inexpensive cameras and amazing variety of amateur and professional films. But by the end of last year it was rapidly running out of cash, its market share had plunged, and its stock was selling for just 54 cents a share.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2011
Long known for spicing up American food, McCormick & Co. is taking its food flavorings abroad, with plans to peddle masala powder in the open-air markets of India and borscht seasoning in the stores of Eastern Europe. Looking for ways to beef up sales in the face of a weak economy and a mature domestic market , the Sparks-based spice maker is increasing its push into emerging nations. McCormick, like other food companies, sees potential for growth in regions where American brands are becoming more commonplace — and gaining market share by expanding their lines to include products demanded by local consumers.
NEWS
March 29, 2010
The March 29 article, "When consumers lack information, free market system falters" by Charles Scott, Fred Derrick, and Andrew Samuel displays a fundamental misunderstanding of how markets work by these authors. They claim that because sellers have more information about their products and services than buyers, most sellers will cheat or defraud their customers. Nonsense. Baltimore Sun reporters have more information about daily news than their readers, and economics professors have more information about the field of economics than their readers do, but that does not guarantee that they are frauds and cheats and that the markets for newspapers and higher education "fail."
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 22, 2005
DETROIT - General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co. are not updating their model lineups as fast as their competitors and likely will continue to lose U.S. market share as a result, according to an annual analysis of the auto market by Merrill Lynch & Co. Inc. GM and Ford will replace just 16 percent and 15 percent of their lineups a year on average over the next four years, estimates Merrill Lynch's report, "Car Wars 2006-2009: The Product Pipeline and...
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | April 1, 1992
Giant Food Inc., the top dog in the Baltimore-Washington grocery business, absorbed a big bite out of fourth-quarter earnings, but apparently neither recession nor aggressive competitors could loosen its grip on market share.The Landover-based grocery store chain reported yesterday that earnings dropped 38 percent, to $24.7 million, or 42 cents a share, from $39.7 million, or 68 cents a share, during last year's fourth quarter, which ended Feb. 23.Quarterly sales were up 8.8 percent, although that figure was closer to 3 percent when adjusted to reflect the extra week in the quarter this year.
BUSINESS
By Jerry Hirsch and Tribune newspapers | February 12, 2010
Auto information and pricing company Edmunds.com took a look at the number of complaints drivers have filed about carmakers with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and compared them with the number of autos the companies have on the road. By that measure, Toyota Motor Corp. looked pretty good. According to the database, which Edmunds noted consists of complaints from individuals and is not checked for accuracy by NHTSA, Toyota was the subject of 9.1 percent of the complaints from 2001 through Feb. 3. During that period, Toyota had a 13.5 percent slice of the U.S. auto market.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
Under Armour's New Year's resolution: Make it a rebuilding year. The Baltimore company, known for its athletic clothing that wicks sweat from the body, will open 15 new outlet stores, revamp its running shoes, upgrade its information technology systems, invest in its Web business and focus more on designing new products. But all the new investment also means that spending and costs will outpace revenue growth, Brad Dickerson, Under Armour's chief financial officer, said in a quarterly earnings conference call with analysts Tuesday.
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