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NEWS
December 30, 2011
The city is misguided if it believes that demolishing vacant homes is the solution to providing affordable housing in Baltimore ("City 'affordable housing' fund destroys more houses than it builds," Dec. 21). Demolishing vacant homes is myopic, since the number of vacant homes will increase as long as the city's population continues to decline. That alone will undermine any alleged improvements to public safety. A 1996 demolition project targeting vacant housing stock in Camden, N.J., initially decreased the vacant housing stock of the city.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Strange though it may seem to say out loud, just about everyone in Harford County is the beneficiary of a residential developer. Be it Howard Park, one of the county's oldest neighborhoods, or Bulle Rock in Havre de Grace, one of its newest, the places where most houses are - and where most people live - are there because of residential land developers. In Harford County, as is the case in many suburban communities, the dynamic is such that people have been attracted because of the relative seclusion, which then attracts another wave of potential buyers, which results in more development, making the place less secluded and generally irritating the people who came for the initial level of seclusion.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | January 30, 2014
Strange though it may seem to say out loud, just about everyone in Harford County is the beneficiary of a residential developer. Be it Howard Park, one of the county's oldest neighborhoods, or Bulle Rock in Havre de Grace, one of its newest, the places where most houses are - and where most people live - are there because of residential land developers. In Harford County, as is the case in many suburban communities, the dynamic is such that people have been attracted because of the relative seclusion, which then attracts another wave of potential buyers, which results in more development, making the place less secluded and generally irritating the people who came for the initial level of seclusion.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 10, 2013
In 1975, when asked to explain why Margaret Thatcher was poised to take over the Tory Party, the irascible British satirist Malcolm Muggeridge replied that it was all due to television - and the fact that the telegenic Mrs. Thatcher had a "certain imbecile charm. " That was one of the nicer things said about an "imbecile" who earned a degree in chemistry from Oxford and became a lawyer while studying at home. (She sent her bar application from the maternity ward while recovering from delivering twins.)
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | February 19, 2006
City planning was one thing when you had a blank space on the map - say, a forested Manhattan Island or a nice piece of undeveloped land rising gently from the natural harbor formed where the Patapsco River meets the Chesapeake Bay. Then, you could paint an urban picture without interference, laying out roads in a neat grid pattern and putting parks and schools and houses and shops and churches and cemeteries pretty much where you wanted. It is quite a different challenge a couple of centuries later, when the roads are already there (too many well-potholed)
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | November 6, 2012
Regardless of who wins the U.S. presidential election today, one thing seems certain: Americans are about to learn the same hard lessons recently visited upon the French and the British. That is, whoever ends up being elected head of any given political system will be required to work within the confines of current global economic forces. Candidates can promise all the economic changes they want within their particular national bubble, but nothing will actually change without the blessing of the global market gods.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1996
A Bethesda company, with a helping hand from the University of Maryland, is out to change the agricultural policies of Egypt -- taking it from a socialized system controlled by the government to a free market economy.Development Alternatives Inc., an international consulting firm, has been awarded a $10 million grant from the U.S. Agency for International Development to increase production, productivity and incomes in the Egyptian agricultural sector through the removal of policy barriers to private enterprise.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | December 27, 1996
Uncle Sam won't let market forces alone. Now he is forbidding bonuses to physicians for letting patients die.One question is whether the governor has authority to order bargaining if the legislature doesn't. Quite another is whether private citizens may stop him if legislators won't.Milosevic is a Titoist on economics, a Stalinist on nationalism and a Dengist on crowd control.''Ebonics'' is not a word in Black English.Pub Date: 12/27/96
NEWS
By Russell Baker | June 21, 1995
Unnoticed by the public and mostly unreported by a press and television besotted with the sound-bite fun of the budget story, a radical rewrite of telecommunications law is now under way in Congress. The immediate result, reports the New York Times. is likely to be "chaos." But then -- ah! --benefits galore. I AM BRACING for another of those great leaps forward that happen when we shake off the shackles of the past. Believe me, braced is the position to be in when these great leaps occur.
NEWS
September 7, 1996
GOV. PARRIS N. GLENDENING wants to use a big carrot. Environmentalists prefer a big stick. That is the crux of the difference between the governor, who has been emphasizing a redirection of suburban growth patterns, and environmental leaders, who fear the governor is not being authoritative enough.The environmentalists hearken back to Gov. Marvin Mandel's 1973 warning to Marylanders about the ecological costs of sprawl. Indeed, we've lost nearly 80 percent of bay wetlands as development has gobbled up farmland and open space for subdivisions, shopping centers and highways farther from the cities.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | November 6, 2012
Regardless of who wins the U.S. presidential election today, one thing seems certain: Americans are about to learn the same hard lessons recently visited upon the French and the British. That is, whoever ends up being elected head of any given political system will be required to work within the confines of current global economic forces. Candidates can promise all the economic changes they want within their particular national bubble, but nothing will actually change without the blessing of the global market gods.
NEWS
October 19, 2012
Tuesday's presidential debate was clearly the most spirited debate in recent history ("Obama takes an aggressive stand," Oct, 17). There were times when the tension between the two candidates was palpable. I believe the debate reflects the very different visions that each candidate has for this country. But among the many issues discussed, the one that resonated most with me was the candidates' stands on equal pay for equal work for women. As the father of a young daughter, I constantly worry about my daughter's ability to succeed in a world that may not value her as her family does because of her race and gender.
NEWS
December 30, 2011
The city is misguided if it believes that demolishing vacant homes is the solution to providing affordable housing in Baltimore ("City 'affordable housing' fund destroys more houses than it builds," Dec. 21). Demolishing vacant homes is myopic, since the number of vacant homes will increase as long as the city's population continues to decline. That alone will undermine any alleged improvements to public safety. A 1996 demolition project targeting vacant housing stock in Camden, N.J., initially decreased the vacant housing stock of the city.
NEWS
January 26, 2011
Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and health Secretary Joshua M. Sharfstein briefed lawmakers in Annapolis this week on a package of bills aimed at setting up the health exchanges states will be required to establish under the new federal health care law passed by Congress last year. Their message: If Maryland is to hit the ground running by 2014, when the most important changes mandated by law kick in, state officials had best start preparing now. Some lawmakers, citing Republican efforts to overturn the health care reform bill in Washington, are urging Maryland to wait.
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | May 29, 2007
CHICAGO -- There are lots of theories on how to succeed in business. But here's one that never occurred to me: Poison your customers. This strategy sounds counterintuitive, since the dead don't do much buying, but some people think it accounts for periodic outbreaks of food-borne illness. They say you can't trust the private sector to keep pathogens out of our food, making it incumbent on the federal government to protect us. The recent episode of lethal pet food is Exhibit A in this case.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | February 19, 2006
City planning was one thing when you had a blank space on the map - say, a forested Manhattan Island or a nice piece of undeveloped land rising gently from the natural harbor formed where the Patapsco River meets the Chesapeake Bay. Then, you could paint an urban picture without interference, laying out roads in a neat grid pattern and putting parks and schools and houses and shops and churches and cemeteries pretty much where you wanted. It is quite a different challenge a couple of centuries later, when the roads are already there (too many well-potholed)
NEWS
August 14, 1992
The spectacle of nearly one million Chinese clamoring to invest their money in the Shenzen stock market -- and creating the largest civil disturbance since the 1989 Tiananmen Square protests -- is the clearest sign that China's policy of "socialism with Chinese characteristics" is falling apart. It is new evidence that the capitalist experiment started in southeastern China 15 years ago is poised to overwhelm the country.When Deng Xiaoping imposed reforms to introduce market forces into China's stagnating economy in the late 1970s, he created a tremendous spurt of economic growth, particularly in south China.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | September 5, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH'S "ownership society" is like his war in Iraq: It may have merits, but these do not include addressing the problem it is intended to solve. At the moment, we are a debtorship society. The government is spending far more than it is bringing in. And even so, our commitments, primarily to supply pensions and health care to the elderly, exceed the amounts we are putting aside to pay for them. Then there's the rhetorical commitment of all politicians to do something about the 45 million Americans with no health insurance.
NEWS
August 14, 2005
FEELING PINCHED at the pump yet? Knocking off more errands in the same car trip? Leaving the gas guzzler in the garage? With gasoline going for about $2.40 a gallon in this region last week, such prudence wouldn't be surprising. After all, for a family driving 25,000 miles a year - at, say, 20 miles per gallon - the increase in fuel costs over the last year, about 50 cents a gallon, amounts to more than $600. But gas consumption has risen this year. The economy is humming. And consumer spending is robust.
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | September 5, 2004
PRESIDENT BUSH'S "ownership society" is like his war in Iraq: It may have merits, but these do not include addressing the problem it is intended to solve. At the moment, we are a debtorship society. The government is spending far more than it is bringing in. And even so, our commitments, primarily to supply pensions and health care to the elderly, exceed the amounts we are putting aside to pay for them. Then there's the rhetorical commitment of all politicians to do something about the 45 million Americans with no health insurance.
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