Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMarket Data
IN THE NEWS

Market Data

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 23, 2007
Because U.S. financial markets were closed yesterday for Thanksgiving, no market data appear in today's editions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
In an industry with a lot of new competition, Belcamp-based SafeNet is a cybersecurity old hand: It's celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. To put that into context: SafeNet predates the World Wide Web. The company, founded with a focus on encryption, had a tumultuous past decade that included a stock options back-dating scandal while it was a publicly traded company. Now owned by a San Francisco firm that took it private in 2007, SafeNet says it protects nearly $1 trillion in transactions daily and has more than 25,000 customers, both government and commercial.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Securities and Exchange Commission said three stock markets must stop giving rebates of market data revenue to brokerages and electronic trading systems. The Cincinnati Stock Exchange, the Pacific Exchange and the Nasdaq stock market give back to brokerages and trading firms some of the fees the exchanges earn from selling data on the price, time and size of Nasdaq trades. Ending the rebates would mean higher costs for the electronic networks and brokers. "The availability of large market data revenue rebates may be creating incentives for traders to engage in transactions with no economic purpose other than to receive market data fees," the SEC said in a statement.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Baltimore is one of the best cities in the U.S. for homebuyers, according to a recent analysis from online housing market data firm Zillow. “Zillow analyzed data on actual sales prices compared to asking prices, the number of days listings spent on Zillow and the percentage of homes on the market with a price cut and ranked the 30 largest metro areas in the country to determine whether buyers or sellers have more negotiating power in a given market,”...
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1995
Earth Observation Satellite Co. has signed a marketing agreement with India's Department of Space that will at least double the Lanham-based company's annual revenue.Under the deal, EOSAT will sell images created by Indian satellites to business and government customers around the world."It's the biggest contract in the history of the company," said Arturo Silvestrini, president and chief executive of the Prince George's County company.The agreement is expected to generate between $75 million and $100 million in annual revenues for EOSAT by 1997.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Baltimore is one of the best cities in the U.S. for homebuyers, according to a recent analysis from online housing market data firm Zillow. “Zillow analyzed data on actual sales prices compared to asking prices, the number of days listings spent on Zillow and the percentage of homes on the market with a price cut and ranked the 30 largest metro areas in the country to determine whether buyers or sellers have more negotiating power in a given market,”...
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
State economic development officials have launched an online tool to help companies interested in relocating to Maryland or local businesses in need of new space. The Maryland Business Properties database lets users search available sites by type, size, location, zoning and rail service. More than 400 properties and 1,400 buildings are listed, the state Department of Business and Economic Development said Tuesday. The tool, which also has market data such as household income and workforce information, is at http://choosemaryland.org/moveyourbusiness/Pages/PropertySearchForm.aspx.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
For the third month in a row, home values in the Baltimore metro area were up in October, according to estimates released Wednesday by housing market data firm Zillow. Home values in Greater Baltimore were up 2 percent annually last month -- to an average home value of $220,800. That's a 0.5 percent increase over September, Zillow said in a statement. The 2 percent gain was the largest 12-month rise in Baltimore-area home values since January 2007, according to Zillow's estimates.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | April 25, 2012
Real estate search site Zillow is predicting that the Baltimore region's housing market will hit bottom this summer. Zillow's chief economist, Stan Humphries, said the company expects an L-shaped recovery here and in most markets, with a substantial period of flat values or small increases. He said the forecast for the end of price drops in the Baltimore area is based on several factors, including the current slowdown in declines and lower-than-average foreclosure activity.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2013
In an industry with a lot of new competition, Belcamp-based SafeNet is a cybersecurity old hand: It's celebrating its 30th anniversary this year. To put that into context: SafeNet predates the World Wide Web. The company, founded with a focus on encryption, had a tumultuous past decade that included a stock options back-dating scandal while it was a publicly traded company. Now owned by a San Francisco firm that took it private in 2007, SafeNet says it protects nearly $1 trillion in transactions daily and has more than 25,000 customers, both government and commercial.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
For the third month in a row, home values in the Baltimore metro area were up in October, according to estimates released Wednesday by housing market data firm Zillow. Home values in Greater Baltimore were up 2 percent annually last month -- to an average home value of $220,800. That's a 0.5 percent increase over September, Zillow said in a statement. The 2 percent gain was the largest 12-month rise in Baltimore-area home values since January 2007, according to Zillow's estimates.
NEWS
By Jeffrey S. Detwiler and President and Chief Operating Officer The Long & Foster® Companies | September 26, 2012
ADVERTORIAL CONTENT After what was easily the longest economic downturn in recent times, momentum is building and national headlines are trumpeting news of economic gains. In the residential housing sector, these swiftly-changing market dynamics certainly offer more opportunity for buyers and sellers than what we've experienced in recent years - but the recovery-driven changes in real estate have also left some consumers' heads spinning. In some areas of the Mid-Atlantic region, those who want to buy houses aren't always finding options that meet their needs at the price point they were expecting and sellers are sometimes surprised to find that their homes are on the market weeks or even just days before they receive offers.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
State economic development officials have launched an online tool to help companies interested in relocating to Maryland or local businesses in need of new space. The Maryland Business Properties database lets users search available sites by type, size, location, zoning and rail service. More than 400 properties and 1,400 buildings are listed, the state Department of Business and Economic Development said Tuesday. The tool, which also has market data such as household income and workforce information, is at http://choosemaryland.org/moveyourbusiness/Pages/PropertySearchForm.aspx.
BUSINESS
Jamie Smith Hopkins | April 25, 2012
Real estate search site Zillow is predicting that the Baltimore region's housing market will hit bottom this summer. Zillow's chief economist, Stan Humphries, said the company expects an L-shaped recovery here and in most markets, with a substantial period of flat values or small increases. He said the forecast for the end of price drops in the Baltimore area is based on several factors, including the current slowdown in declines and lower-than-average foreclosure activity.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | December 28, 2007
If you've been following along at home, you know that the Baltimore metro area's housing market had slightly lower average prices last month and a big drop in sales. But if real estate is really about location, location, location, wouldn't it be useful to know what happened at a more local level? I thought so, which is why I've just crunched the numbers that way. If you focus on the 87 ZIP codes in the metro area that had at least five sales last month and at least five sales in November 2006, according to data from Metropolitan Regional Information Systems, here's what you'll see: ZIP codes where sales rose: 11 percent Where sales fell: 82 percent Where sales remained flat: 7 percent ZIP codes where average prices rose: 43 percent Where prices fell: 55 percent Where prices remained flat: 2 percent ZIP codes with at least 10 percent gains in average price: 23 percent ZIP codes with at least 10 percent losses in average price: 34 percent Number of the 10 most expensive ZIP codes that saw average prices fall: 1 Number of the 10 least expensive ZIP codes that saw average prices fall: 8 Most expensive ZIP code in November: 21029 (Clarksville)
BUSINESS
November 23, 2007
Because U.S. financial markets were closed yesterday for Thanksgiving, no market data appear in today's editions.
NEWS
By Jeffrey S. Detwiler and President and Chief Operating Officer The Long & Foster® Companies | September 26, 2012
ADVERTORIAL CONTENT After what was easily the longest economic downturn in recent times, momentum is building and national headlines are trumpeting news of economic gains. In the residential housing sector, these swiftly-changing market dynamics certainly offer more opportunity for buyers and sellers than what we've experienced in recent years - but the recovery-driven changes in real estate have also left some consumers' heads spinning. In some areas of the Mid-Atlantic region, those who want to buy houses aren't always finding options that meet their needs at the price point they were expecting and sellers are sometimes surprised to find that their homes are on the market weeks or even just days before they receive offers.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | December 28, 2007
If you've been following along at home, you know that the Baltimore metro area's housing market had slightly lower average prices last month and a big drop in sales. But if real estate is really about location, location, location, wouldn't it be useful to know what happened at a more local level? I thought so, which is why I've just crunched the numbers that way. If you focus on the 87 ZIP codes in the metro area that had at least five sales last month and at least five sales in November 2006, according to data from Metropolitan Regional Information Systems, here's what you'll see: ZIP codes where sales rose: 11 percent Where sales fell: 82 percent Where sales remained flat: 7 percent ZIP codes where average prices rose: 43 percent Where prices fell: 55 percent Where prices remained flat: 2 percent ZIP codes with at least 10 percent gains in average price: 23 percent ZIP codes with at least 10 percent losses in average price: 34 percent Number of the 10 most expensive ZIP codes that saw average prices fall: 1 Number of the 10 least expensive ZIP codes that saw average prices fall: 8 Most expensive ZIP code in November: 21029 (Clarksville)
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | July 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Securities and Exchange Commission said three stock markets must stop giving rebates of market data revenue to brokerages and electronic trading systems. The Cincinnati Stock Exchange, the Pacific Exchange and the Nasdaq stock market give back to brokerages and trading firms some of the fees the exchanges earn from selling data on the price, time and size of Nasdaq trades. Ending the rebates would mean higher costs for the electronic networks and brokers. "The availability of large market data revenue rebates may be creating incentives for traders to engage in transactions with no economic purpose other than to receive market data fees," the SEC said in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | July 14, 1998
The Rouse Co. unveiled yesterday a partnership with a New York research company that will give consumer product companies access to its malls and customers.The alliance with Research International USA aims to generate millions of dollars in revenue for the Columbia-based mall developer and provide Rouse with continually updated information and market data about its customers, building on a similar link Rouse made in April with WPP Group PLC, Research International's London-based parent.With Research International, Rouse intends to survey hundreds of thousands of customers and gain insight into their shopping desires and needs.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.