Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMarket Analysis
IN THE NEWS

Market Analysis

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2003
Baltimore-based Legg Mason Inc. has been ordered by a federal jury to pay almost $20 million to a financial newsletter publisher in a case that could make it easier to punish those who illegally distribute copyrighted works via e-mail or the Internet. Lowry's Reports Inc., a small but well-known publisher of stock market analysis, alleged in a lawsuit that Legg Mason made unauthorized copies of its newsletter and distributed the information to its 1,300 brokers through an internal Web site and other means.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
John Palasits envisions an electronic menu that would enable restaurant customers to place their orders when ready instead of summoning a waiter. Rhyan Guidry foresees a personalized hairstyling studio that would teach patrons to do their own locks. And Justin Carmona is exploring opening a gym that would cater to patrons six days a week but reserve the seventh for high school teams' training. The three were among 13 Howard Community College students seeking to create and market their business ventures in a three-to five-minute product-pitching competition called "Rocket Marketing," which was held at the school this month.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1996
Cellar Door Productions, a Virginia concert promoter, is considering state property in Sykesville as a site for an outdoor arena.Dave Williams, president of Cellar Door, which owns the Nissan Pavilion in Bristow, said a 131-acre section of Springfield Hospital Center is one of several sites the company is considering in Maryland. He called all the prospects suitable and said any one could be his final choice.He described the land and 14 unused, century-old buildings -- known as the hospital's Warfield Complex -- as "a lovely, lovely piece that we looked at a year ago. But the ball is in the county's court now."
NEWS
By SANDY ALEXANDER and SANDY ALEXANDER,SUN REPORTER | April 21, 2006
While the younger children petted and talked to the lambs, hogs and goats trotting around in pens at the Howard County Fairgrounds, older 4-H participants measured, prodded and squeezed the animals, regarding them with analytical eyes. A good market lamb "has to be between 50 and 60 pounds ... with a neck real skinny and long," said Karen Vanisko, 9, of Ellicott City. What about the lamb's backside? asked her aunt. "You want it to be square," Karen said. She thought she had found a contender in the first lamb to be auctioned, bidding up to $150.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | January 12, 1992
You own a snug rancher in Pikesville. For better than a year, you've contemplated moving to a large colonial in Reisterstown with a bedroom for every kid. But you're not sure. All the talk about soft housing prices has you worried about what your rancher would fetch.Then you get an idea. Why not test the market by putting the rancher up for sale before you've actually committed to letting it go?Yet what seems like a bright idea is not so bright, realty experts say. Sure, you'll get a notion of what your house might bring if prospective buyers start to nibble.
BUSINESS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 17, 2005
State association's excellence awards honor local builders The Sales and Marketing Council of the Home Builders Association of Maryland has announced the 2004 Maryland Award of Excellence (MAX) winners. The MAX program recognizes excellence in design, livability and value. "We applaud the achievements of those in the local home building industry," said Don Sample, the group's president. "The winners epitomize the best of our efforts to provide Marylanders with an improved quality of life."
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | May 30, 2001
"The free-falling Nasdaq and slumping Dow are sending many a do-it-yourself investor scurrying for advice from financial planners," says Financial Planning Perspectives newsletter. "It's not that clients of financial planners are immune to bad markets, but, unlike go-it-alone investors caught up in the high-tech hype or water-cooler advice, most financial-planning clients keep a more diversified portfolio, so they aren't hit as hard when a particular sector tumbles." More excerpts: "Financial planners help keep clients from overreacting to market vicissitudes.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 21, 1999
WHAT STOCKS should you buy -- and why?WALLFLOWERS: "With valuations high, look for unpopular stocks with stories not generally understood," says Robert Salomon Jr., money manager. "Buy only reasonably valued companies with improving prospects like Xerox Corp., Masco Corp., Tyco International and AT&T."LOVE IN BLOOM: These stocks are listed under "Most-Loved Stocks: Compilation of Analysts' Opinions," in Bloomberg's Personal Finance magazine: Omnicom Group Inc., Masco Corp., Honeywell Inc., Medtronic Inc., America Online Inc., Tellabs Inc., Safeway Inc. and Fannie Mae.NO LOVE LOST: These are listed in the same magazine under "Analysts' Most-Hated Stocks": Wrigley Wm. Jr. Co., Eastman Chemical Co., Stanley Works, J. C. Penney Inc., Dow Chemical Co., Union Carbide Corp.
BUSINESS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2003
Valuing the price of a house is based on a variety of factors including what other homes in the neighborhood have been selling for lately. Homeowners often get their initial figures from a Realtor, who provides a comparable market analysis by assessing a home's location, its amenities and the prices of similar properties sold during the past few months. While this is a good place to start, said Steven VanGrack, outgoing chairman of the Maryland Real Estate Commission, a market analysis is nothing more than an educated estimate.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1998
"We expect little impact [from global financial troubles] on U.S. economic growth, corporate profitability and cash flow, suggesting that values have notably improved in recent weeks. Importantly, we do not expect global recession this year or next."Abby Joseph Cohen, chief strategist, Goldman, Sachs & Co."The situation in Russia is serious. Selling begets selling and more selling, which begets panic. Whether it's a bear market really doesn't make a difference; this is a major correction or what we call a change of sentiment.
BUSINESS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 17, 2005
State association's excellence awards honor local builders The Sales and Marketing Council of the Home Builders Association of Maryland has announced the 2004 Maryland Award of Excellence (MAX) winners. The MAX program recognizes excellence in design, livability and value. "We applaud the achievements of those in the local home building industry," said Don Sample, the group's president. "The winners epitomize the best of our efforts to provide Marylanders with an improved quality of life."
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2003
Baltimore-based Legg Mason Inc. has been ordered by a federal jury to pay almost $20 million to a financial newsletter publisher in a case that could make it easier to punish those who illegally distribute copyrighted works via e-mail or the Internet. Lowry's Reports Inc., a small but well-known publisher of stock market analysis, alleged in a lawsuit that Legg Mason made unauthorized copies of its newsletter and distributed the information to its 1,300 brokers through an internal Web site and other means.
BUSINESS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 15, 2003
Valuing the price of a house is based on a variety of factors including what other homes in the neighborhood have been selling for lately. Homeowners often get their initial figures from a Realtor, who provides a comparable market analysis by assessing a home's location, its amenities and the prices of similar properties sold during the past few months. While this is a good place to start, said Steven VanGrack, outgoing chairman of the Maryland Real Estate Commission, a market analysis is nothing more than an educated estimate.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | May 30, 2001
"The free-falling Nasdaq and slumping Dow are sending many a do-it-yourself investor scurrying for advice from financial planners," says Financial Planning Perspectives newsletter. "It's not that clients of financial planners are immune to bad markets, but, unlike go-it-alone investors caught up in the high-tech hype or water-cooler advice, most financial-planning clients keep a more diversified portfolio, so they aren't hit as hard when a particular sector tumbles." More excerpts: "Financial planners help keep clients from overreacting to market vicissitudes.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | May 21, 1999
WHAT STOCKS should you buy -- and why?WALLFLOWERS: "With valuations high, look for unpopular stocks with stories not generally understood," says Robert Salomon Jr., money manager. "Buy only reasonably valued companies with improving prospects like Xerox Corp., Masco Corp., Tyco International and AT&T."LOVE IN BLOOM: These stocks are listed under "Most-Loved Stocks: Compilation of Analysts' Opinions," in Bloomberg's Personal Finance magazine: Omnicom Group Inc., Masco Corp., Honeywell Inc., Medtronic Inc., America Online Inc., Tellabs Inc., Safeway Inc. and Fannie Mae.NO LOVE LOST: These are listed in the same magazine under "Analysts' Most-Hated Stocks": Wrigley Wm. Jr. Co., Eastman Chemical Co., Stanley Works, J. C. Penney Inc., Dow Chemical Co., Union Carbide Corp.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1998
"We expect little impact [from global financial troubles] on U.S. economic growth, corporate profitability and cash flow, suggesting that values have notably improved in recent weeks. Importantly, we do not expect global recession this year or next."Abby Joseph Cohen, chief strategist, Goldman, Sachs & Co."The situation in Russia is serious. Selling begets selling and more selling, which begets panic. Whether it's a bear market really doesn't make a difference; this is a major correction or what we call a change of sentiment.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
John Palasits envisions an electronic menu that would enable restaurant customers to place their orders when ready instead of summoning a waiter. Rhyan Guidry foresees a personalized hairstyling studio that would teach patrons to do their own locks. And Justin Carmona is exploring opening a gym that would cater to patrons six days a week but reserve the seventh for high school teams' training. The three were among 13 Howard Community College students seeking to create and market their business ventures in a three-to five-minute product-pitching competition called "Rocket Marketing," which was held at the school this month.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | October 10, 1993
The townhouse had a loft overlooking the master bedroom, as well as solid oak cabinets in the kitchen. And the young doctor who wanted the Chapelgate property knew it was priced at least $10,000 below other homes of its kind.Still, believing no one should pay full price in a buyers' market, the doctor offered 2 percent under list. But while he waited confidently for a counteroffer from the seller, the property was sold to another bidder."When the house is a good value, it can go quick. If you don't jump on it, you can get your heart broken," says Ed Haywood, the agent who brought the doctor to the Chapelgate home.
BUSINESS
By Mary Medland and Mary Medland,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 15, 1998
When you get right down to it, the process of appraising property really isn't that complex.But, still, many home sellers -- and buyers -- don't thoroughly understand just what an appraisal is, why it's important, or how it differs from a Realtor's home market analysis or a home inspection."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | November 21, 1996
Cellar Door Productions, a Virginia concert promoter, is considering state property in Sykesville as a site for an outdoor arena.Dave Williams, president of Cellar Door, which owns the Nissan Pavilion in Bristow, said a 131-acre section of Springfield Hospital Center is one of several sites the company is considering in Maryland. He called all the prospects suitable and said any one could be his final choice.He described the land and 14 unused, century-old buildings -- known as the hospital's Warfield Complex -- as "a lovely, lovely piece that we looked at a year ago. But the ball is in the county's court now."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.