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Mark Strand

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By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,From "Darker," by Mark Strand (1972)Book Editor | October 23, 1993
Mark Strand, the 1990-1991 American poet laureate and former winner of a MacArthur Foundation "genius grant," will join the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University as a senior professor of poetry in July 1994.Mr. Strand's appointment was a significant addition to the Writing Seminars, the second-oldest university writing department in the country (it was founded in 1947; the University of Iowa's began in 1939).A professor at the University of Utah since 1981, Mr. Strand, 59, has won numerous awards, including the MacArthur grant in 1987 and the prestigious Bollingen Prize for Poetry this year.
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By Holly Selby | September 3, 2000
Ever wonder how it would sound if a painter played the cello? What it would look like if a novelist could sculpt? Now you have a chance to see -- and hear -- one artist's vision in two media: printmaking and poetry. Prints made by former U.S. Poet Laureate Mark Strand will be on display Saturday through Oct. 21 at the Goya-Girl Press at Baltimore's Mill Center. The poet will also read some of his latest literary works at an opening reception to be held Saturday from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. (The reading will begin at 6:30 p.m.)
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 7, 2000
Goya Girl Press is a Baltimore gem that surely deserves wider recognition and appreciation. Started in 1996 by artist Martha Macks, the press' studio at Mill Centre in Hampden provides workshop space, equipment and the services of two master printers who collaborate with artists to create works in a variety of printmaking media, including etching, lithography, screen printing and monotype. The press also operates a gallery for works by local and nationally recognized artists and a publishing business that distributes prints by selected artists.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | March 7, 2000
Goya Girl Press is a Baltimore gem that surely deserves wider recognition and appreciation. Started in 1996 by artist Martha Macks, the press' studio at Mill Centre in Hampden provides workshop space, equipment and the services of two master printers who collaborate with artists to create works in a variety of printmaking media, including etching, lithography, screen printing and monotype. The press also operates a gallery for works by local and nationally recognized artists and a publishing business that distributes prints by selected artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Holly Selby | September 3, 2000
Ever wonder how it would sound if a painter played the cello? What it would look like if a novelist could sculpt? Now you have a chance to see -- and hear -- one artist's vision in two media: printmaking and poetry. Prints made by former U.S. Poet Laureate Mark Strand will be on display Saturday through Oct. 21 at the Goya-Girl Press at Baltimore's Mill Center. The poet will also read some of his latest literary works at an opening reception to be held Saturday from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. (The reading will begin at 6:30 p.m.)
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1997
Just a year after becoming director of the writing seminar at the Johns Hopkins University, cultural critic Mark Crispin Miller has accepted a post at New York University because, he says, he has not been granted sufficient respect or support by Hopkins.Miller, 47, has written extensively on advertising and film. But he has received perhaps his widest exposure for his deeply skeptical views on corporate control of U.S. news organizations and of the effects of the evolving new media."I've been a one-man band here all along.
FEATURES
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
Mark Strand, the former U.S. poet laureate who was lured to the Johns Hopkins University faculty four years ago amid much fanfare, is departing for the University of Chicago with a bitter blast at Hopkins, its administration and even Baltimore.On April 1, Strand, 63, will begin teaching literature at Chicago's Committee on Social Thought, an interdisciplinary think tank. He said his salary will be nearly doubled, from $82,000 to $146,000, and Hopkins made no counteroffer."Had Hopkins made some kind of gesture, even for a lower salary, I would have considered it," Strand said yesterday.
NEWS
September 15, 1996
BALTIMORE CATCHES a lot of grief for the motto Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke chose for it, "the city that reads." It seems a joke when one considers problems within the public schools.But Baltimore does have an important literary history and one of the finest public libraries in the nation in the Enoch Pratt. It is therefore appropriate that the city celebrate its first Baltimore Book Festival, Sept. 28-29, at Mount Vernon Place. Indeed, one wonders why it hasn't done so before now.The outdoor event will include storytelling, poetry readings, children's activities, author signings, literary walking tours, book selling, displays by publishing companies, bookbinding demonstrations, live music and a cafe.
FEATURES
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | April 13, 1999
NEW YORK -- Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux had a good day yesterday, winning two awards in the Pulitzer Prize arts categories: in fiction for "The Hours," a novel by Michael Cunningham, and non-fiction for "Annals of the Former World" by John McPhee."
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor 1/8 1/8 TC | March 4, 1993
Let's see . . . five poets. Among them, two Nobel Prizes and two Pulitzers. The last three American poet laureates.That's the feast -- and the dilemma -- facing Baltimore poetry lovers in the next two weeks. For in the short space of 12 days, five of the best-known poets in the world will be appearing in the area.There's Joseph Brodsky, the winner of the 1987 Nobel Prize for Literature and poet laureate from 1991-1992, who will be reading at the University of Maryland Baltimore County Monday night.
FEATURES
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1998
Mark Strand, the former U.S. poet laureate who was lured to the Johns Hopkins University faculty four years ago amid much fanfare, is departing for the University of Chicago with a bitter blast at Hopkins, its administration and even Baltimore.On April 1, Strand, 63, will begin teaching literature at Chicago's Committee on Social Thought, an interdisciplinary think tank. He said his salary will be nearly doubled, from $82,000 to $146,000, and Hopkins made no counteroffer."Had Hopkins made some kind of gesture, even for a lower salary, I would have considered it," Strand said yesterday.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1997
Just a year after becoming director of the writing seminar at the Johns Hopkins University, cultural critic Mark Crispin Miller has accepted a post at New York University because, he says, he has not been granted sufficient respect or support by Hopkins.Miller, 47, has written extensively on advertising and film. But he has received perhaps his widest exposure for his deeply skeptical views on corporate control of U.S. news organizations and of the effects of the evolving new media."I've been a one-man band here all along.
NEWS
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,From "Darker," by Mark Strand (1972)Book Editor | October 23, 1993
Mark Strand, the 1990-1991 American poet laureate and former winner of a MacArthur Foundation "genius grant," will join the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University as a senior professor of poetry in July 1994.Mr. Strand's appointment was a significant addition to the Writing Seminars, the second-oldest university writing department in the country (it was founded in 1947; the University of Iowa's began in 1939).A professor at the University of Utah since 1981, Mr. Strand, 59, has won numerous awards, including the MacArthur grant in 1987 and the prestigious Bollingen Prize for Poetry this year.
FEATURES
By Lili Wright and Lili Wright,Special to The Sun | April 20, 1994
Each morning, after his wife and son have left for the day, Mark Strand climbs the stairs to his third-floor study and begins the business of writing poetry.He often starts by staring out the window, studying how the appearance of the mountains has changed overnight. Then he settles down to read -- poetry, classics or art books -- scribbling down words that pop off the page and suggest other words he may need later.Editors periodically call, trolling for work or asking him to do a reading in New York or Nicaragua or some other place he doesn't want to go. Mr. Strand in turn makes calls, usually to other poets.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman | October 10, 1994
Writers who desire great honors -- the Nobel, poet laureate for the United States, or the world's richest poetry prize -- may want to try this incantation: HoCoPoLitSo, HoCoPoLitSo, HoCoPoLitSo.That's the accepted shorthand for the Columbia-based Howard County Poetry and Literature Society, which seems to have an uncanny knack for bringing good fortune to its speakers.The society, which celebrates its 20th anniversary next month, snared W. S. Merwin for this weekend's residency. Last month, he was awarded the first-ever Tanning Prize, a $100,000 bequest.
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