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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 1999
By all accounts, Grace Williams should be dead, the victim of a parachute that failed to open properly on her first jump.Somehow, though, she comes through unscathed, and therein lies the central dilemma of "Falling Grace," the Mark Scharf play in production at River Hill High School in Clarksville under the auspices of the Directors' Choice Theater Company and the Baltimore Playwrights Festival.Is the young woman's survival a matter of luck, or has she been delivered miraculously from death by the grace (get it?
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EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | January 26, 2012
The Fells Point Corner Theatre production ofEugene O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh" is being staged in the right Baltimore neighborhood, because the entire play takes place in a bar. This is such a hard-drinking play that the word-drunk characters only shut up when they pass out, and even then they mumble in their sleep. Let's just say that the personally troubled, Pulitzer- and Nobel-prize winning playwright knew his down-and-out characters well, because O'Neill is completely persuasive in depicting their boasting and their brawls.
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FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | May 17, 2007
Increased attention to script development is the focus of the 26th annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival, which begins in July and will feature nine plays produced by seven companies. Two indications of this focus, according to Rich Espey, festival chairman, are the creation of a biweekly playwrights group and the debut of a new theater company. Founded by director Barry Feinstein and playwright Terry Kenney, the Theatrical Mining Company sprang up to work on some of the scripts that didn't make the cut for last year's festival.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | May 17, 2007
Increased attention to script development is the focus of the 26th annual Baltimore Playwrights Festival, which begins in July and will feature nine plays produced by seven companies. Two indications of this focus, according to Rich Espey, festival chairman, are the creation of a biweekly playwrights group and the debut of a new theater company. Founded by director Barry Feinstein and playwright Terry Kenney, the Theatrical Mining Company sprang up to work on some of the scripts that didn't make the cut for last year's festival.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 6, 2004
Ten plays, on subjects ranging from pre-Civil Rights era racism to a family business, will be produced by seven local theater companies in this summer's Baltimore Playwrights Festival. It may be indicative of how institutionalized the 23-year-old festival has become that all but three of this year's playwrights are festival veterans. Two of those - Mark Scharf (who is also the festival chairman) and Joe Dennison - will each be shepherding their 11th festival productions. At the same time, the roster of participating theaters includes a newcomer - the Invisible Theatre Company, founded in the late 1990s by a group of Roland Park Country School alumnae.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
Two new one-act plays by veteran playwrights - both exploring different reactions to violence - open back-to-back tomorrow night at the Mobtown Theater in Hampden. In the first, a sudden act of violence ruins the lives of victims. In the second, a victim shows that her life need not be controlled by a man who threatens her. The two plays mark the beginning of this year's Baltimore Playwrights Festival - an annual showcase of new plays by Maryland writers. Eight more plays will be produced at local theaters throughout the summer.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | January 26, 2012
The Fells Point Corner Theatre production ofEugene O'Neill's "The Iceman Cometh" is being staged in the right Baltimore neighborhood, because the entire play takes place in a bar. This is such a hard-drinking play that the word-drunk characters only shut up when they pass out, and even then they mumble in their sleep. Let's just say that the personally troubled, Pulitzer- and Nobel-prize winning playwright knew his down-and-out characters well, because O'Neill is completely persuasive in depicting their boasting and their brawls.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 17, 2006
Wrapping up one of the richest Baltimore Playwrights Festivals in the event's 25-year history, the two coming-of-age plays that opened last weekend are the latest proof that this showcase of new work has itself come of age. It's not just the writing that's impressive; there's expert handling of up-to-the-minute cyber details in Rich Espey's Hope's Arbor and imaginative flourishes in Ira Gamerman's Split. Both productions also feature notable performances, many by relative newcomers. The title character in Hope's Arbor is the 17-year-old daughter of recently separated parents.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2001
The letters have spilled out of one file into a second. Playwright Mark Scharf says he keeps them all, even though they all say the same thing in one form or another: No. "No," thank you, or "No" without the thank you or "No" with explanation or without. These rejection letters come from theater companies and playwriting contests, from one end of the country to the other. Their sting would be familiar to any writer who has aspired to publication or production. Radio raconteur, short story writer and novelist Garrison Keillor used to say that as a youth he spent years writing for the New Yorker, only they never knew it. Scharf has written for any number of stages, some of which have taken notice.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | June 23, 2005
Blue Mermaid, a new play by prolific Baltimore Playwrights Festival author Mark Scharf, is the latest Playwrights Festival offering. Opening tonight at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, the drama, set in Ocean City, focuses on three generations of women in the same family as they struggle to find themselves and reforge familial bonds. Under Alex Willis' direction, Susan Scher plays the grandmother, Tiffany James plays her mixed-raced granddaughter and Pam Feldman plays the girl's aunt. Show times at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St., are 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 7 p.m. Sundays, through July 10. Tickets are $14. Call 410-276-7837.
FEATURES
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK and J. WYNN ROUSUCK,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 17, 2006
Wrapping up one of the richest Baltimore Playwrights Festivals in the event's 25-year history, the two coming-of-age plays that opened last weekend are the latest proof that this showcase of new work has itself come of age. It's not just the writing that's impressive; there's expert handling of up-to-the-minute cyber details in Rich Espey's Hope's Arbor and imaginative flourishes in Ira Gamerman's Split. Both productions also feature notable performances, many by relative newcomers. The title character in Hope's Arbor is the 17-year-old daughter of recently separated parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2004
Two new one-act plays by veteran playwrights - both exploring different reactions to violence - open back-to-back tomorrow night at the Mobtown Theater in Hampden. In the first, a sudden act of violence ruins the lives of victims. In the second, a victim shows that her life need not be controlled by a man who threatens her. The two plays mark the beginning of this year's Baltimore Playwrights Festival - an annual showcase of new plays by Maryland writers. Eight more plays will be produced at local theaters throughout the summer.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 6, 2004
Ten plays, on subjects ranging from pre-Civil Rights era racism to a family business, will be produced by seven local theater companies in this summer's Baltimore Playwrights Festival. It may be indicative of how institutionalized the 23-year-old festival has become that all but three of this year's playwrights are festival veterans. Two of those - Mark Scharf (who is also the festival chairman) and Joe Dennison - will each be shepherding their 11th festival productions. At the same time, the roster of participating theaters includes a newcomer - the Invisible Theatre Company, founded in the late 1990s by a group of Roland Park Country School alumnae.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2001
The letters have spilled out of one file into a second. Playwright Mark Scharf says he keeps them all, even though they all say the same thing in one form or another: No. "No," thank you, or "No" without the thank you or "No" with explanation or without. These rejection letters come from theater companies and playwriting contests, from one end of the country to the other. Their sting would be familiar to any writer who has aspired to publication or production. Radio raconteur, short story writer and novelist Garrison Keillor used to say that as a youth he spent years writing for the New Yorker, only they never knew it. Scharf has written for any number of stages, some of which have taken notice.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 12, 1999
By all accounts, Grace Williams should be dead, the victim of a parachute that failed to open properly on her first jump.Somehow, though, she comes through unscathed, and therein lies the central dilemma of "Falling Grace," the Mark Scharf play in production at River Hill High School in Clarksville under the auspices of the Directors' Choice Theater Company and the Baltimore Playwrights Festival.Is the young woman's survival a matter of luck, or has she been delivered miraculously from death by the grace (get it?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 7, 1997
"Second Star to the Right," Gaithersburg playwright Mark Scharf's third Baltimore Playwrights Festival production in four years, opens tomorrow at the Spotlighters Theatre.Directed by Miriam Bazensky, "Second Star to the Right" is about an astrophysicist who makes a discovery that has repercussions in her personal as well as professional life. Carol Oles, Rodney Bonds and Erik Delfosse head the cast.Show times at the Spotlighters, 817 St. Paul St., are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, through Aug. 30. Tickets are $10. Call 410-752-1225.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 6, 1998
Three one-act comedies, opening at the Spotlighters Theatre tomorrow, are the latest offerings in this summer's Baltimore Playwrights Festival.Mark Scharf's "Like White on Rice," one of two plays by Scharf in this year's festival, is a 10-minute comedy written entirely in cliches. Paul Sambol's "One for the Road" is about a quirky fortune teller and an insurance underwriter who's facing downsizing. And Robert Leland Taylor's "Sex without Pliers" is a satire of detective fiction. Miriam Bazensky directs the first two playlets, and Bob Bardoff directs the third, with three cast members - Dan Bursi, Jerry Gietka and Cindy Spearman - taking on multiple roles.
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