Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMark Rothko
IN THE NEWS

Mark Rothko

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
It's talky, contrived and a little creaky, but John Logan's "Red," the two-actor play on the boards at Everyman Theatre , is also remarkably absorbing, even uplifting. Who knew art history could be so much fun? Sorry, that sounds flip. And "Red" is anything but flip. The Tony Award-winning work, set in the late 1950s, conjures up an encounter with Mark Rothko, the celebrated abstract expressionist who created the equivalent of epic operas from vast fields of color. On a single canvas, a few painstakingly applied shades interact with and within each other.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2013
It's talky, contrived and a little creaky, but John Logan's "Red," the two-actor play on the boards at Everyman Theatre , is also remarkably absorbing, even uplifting. Who knew art history could be so much fun? Sorry, that sounds flip. And "Red" is anything but flip. The Tony Award-winning work, set in the late 1950s, conjures up an encounter with Mark Rothko, the celebrated abstract expressionist who created the equivalent of epic operas from vast fields of color. On a single canvas, a few painstakingly applied shades interact with and within each other.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By JOHN DORSERY and JOHN DORSERY,SUN ART CRITIC | May 26, 1998
Mark Rothko, who suffered from depression and eventually killed himself, thought that art should be tragic. So it may seem strange to call him an artist of beauty and joy.But in the Rothko retrospective now at Washington's National Gallery, one can revel in his luscious colors, bask in the warmth of his seductive reds and yellows, enjoy the breeze that seems to waft from his cool blues and greens, be dazzled by his brilliant whites and melt into his welcoming...
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
In John Logan's heralded play "Red," the brilliant, suffered-no-fools painter Mark Rothko doesn't have much patience for his new assistant, Ken. "You have a lot to learn, young man," the artist says. "Philosophy. Theology. Literature. Poetry. Drama. History. Archaeology. Anthropology. Mythology. Music. … You cannot be an artist until you are civilized. You cannot be civilized until you learn. To be civilized is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art and your world.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
In John Logan's heralded play "Red," the brilliant, suffered-no-fools painter Mark Rothko doesn't have much patience for his new assistant, Ken. "You have a lot to learn, young man," the artist says. "Philosophy. Theology. Literature. Poetry. Drama. History. Archaeology. Anthropology. Mythology. Music. … You cannot be an artist until you are civilized. You cannot be civilized until you learn. To be civilized is to know where you belong in the continuum of your art and your world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
It might be hard to duplicate the anticipation and publicity that greeted the inaugural season in Everyman Theatre 's inviting new home on West Fayette Street, but that hasn't stopped the company from trying. "I want next season to be even more exciting than the first one," said Vincent Lancisi, Everyman's founding artistic director. "We've got three modern classics and three newer plays. Three of the works are by women. And three are Baltimore premieres. " The 2013-2014 lineup is the first full season in the new venue, which opened in January with an acclaimed staging of Tracy Letts' "August: Osage County.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 17, 1993
Jane K. Bledsoe, curator of the Elaine de Kooning retrospective that opens at the Maryland Institute College of Art this week, says that when the artist taught at the University of Georgia in the 1970s, "there was this one particular book on art and culture, and this was the shining light and path to everything. She carried it around with her and insisted that everyone read that book."She would do that with people. Whoever she took under her wing she became absolutely intensely involved in helping them, nurturing them, making them be artists, do whatever it was that they wanted to do."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt | July 1, 1999
Brian Taylor is a young artist and recent graduate of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, whose large-format paintings -- some of them 8 feet by 8 feet -- deftly meld classicism with abstraction. Taylor's work, which seems to owe as much to Ingres as to such post-painterly abstractionists as Mark Rothko, is on view at Gomez Gallery through July 25.Gomez is also showing 12 color images by French photographer Bernard Faucon.Gomez Gallery is at 3600 Clipper Mill Road. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. For information, call 410-662-9510.
NEWS
January 2, 1998
Dominique de Menil, 89, a connoisseur, art collector and creator with her husband, Jean, of the Menil Foundation in Houston, died Wednesday at her home in Houston.Mrs. de Menil and her husband, whose fortune came from oil-well technology, became widely known for having commissioned for Houston the nearby nondenominational Rothko Chapel, designed by Philip Johnson and dedicated in 1971.With its somber, meditational paintings by Mark Rothko and its adjacent sculpture, "Broken Obelisk" by Barnett Newman, it soon became a place of ecumenical pilgrimage.
NEWS
September 8, 2002
M. Ross Bigelow, 77, a retired California Superior Court judge who presided over the 1974 trial of two Symbionese Liberation Army members, died Tuesday in Los Angeles of congestive heart failure. Appointed to municipal court in 1969 by then-Gov. Ronald Reagan, Mr. Bigelow began his 15-year career as a Superior Court judge in 1973. His most highly publicized case was the trial of SLA members Russell Little and Joseph Remiro on charges of the attempted murder of a policeman, assault and possession of explosives after a 1974 shootout.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2013
It might be hard to duplicate the anticipation and publicity that greeted the inaugural season in Everyman Theatre 's inviting new home on West Fayette Street, but that hasn't stopped the company from trying. "I want next season to be even more exciting than the first one," said Vincent Lancisi, Everyman's founding artistic director. "We've got three modern classics and three newer plays. Three of the works are by women. And three are Baltimore premieres. " The 2013-2014 lineup is the first full season in the new venue, which opened in January with an acclaimed staging of Tracy Letts' "August: Osage County.
FEATURES
By JOHN DORSERY and JOHN DORSERY,SUN ART CRITIC | May 26, 1998
Mark Rothko, who suffered from depression and eventually killed himself, thought that art should be tragic. So it may seem strange to call him an artist of beauty and joy.But in the Rothko retrospective now at Washington's National Gallery, one can revel in his luscious colors, bask in the warmth of his seductive reds and yellows, enjoy the breeze that seems to waft from his cool blues and greens, be dazzled by his brilliant whites and melt into his welcoming...
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | January 17, 1993
Jane K. Bledsoe, curator of the Elaine de Kooning retrospective that opens at the Maryland Institute College of Art this week, says that when the artist taught at the University of Georgia in the 1970s, "there was this one particular book on art and culture, and this was the shining light and path to everything. She carried it around with her and insisted that everyone read that book."She would do that with people. Whoever she took under her wing she became absolutely intensely involved in helping them, nurturing them, making them be artists, do whatever it was that they wanted to do."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2003
The paintings of Milton Avery are a must-see for anyone who figures that America's full-fledged entry into art's modern age came via the abstract expressionists of the 1940s and 1950s. The process actually began a generation or so earlier with Avery's works. "His paintings were psychologically riveting in the way they left realism behind," explains Hydee Schaller, director of the Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis, where 28 of the artist's portraits, landscapes and still lifes are on display through Feb. 22. "He was a precursor to abstract expressionism, and a very important influence on 20th- century American art."
NEWS
March 18, 1999
Maud Cabot Morgan, 96, an artist who exhibited with Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko and Barnett Newman and was a mentor to Frank Stella and Carl Andre, died Sunday in Cambridge, Mass. Ms. Morgan worked in abstract and representational styles. She drew and painted in watercolors, oils, and gouache, created collages, made prints and worked with handmade paper. In New York, her work was bought by the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Whitney Museum.Stefan Schnabel, 87, an actor known for his portrayal of Middle European characters onstage, in films and on television, died March 11 in Rogaro, Italy.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.