Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMark Mcewen
IN THE NEWS

Mark Mcewen

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1995
Mark McEwen came home yesterday to Baltimore radio, where his broadcast career began.The weather forecaster and entertainment editor of television's "CBS This Morning" dropped by the studios of 98 Rock, WIYY-FM (97.9), to share a microphone for an hour with afternoon personality Kirk McEwen -- his younger brother."CBS This Morning" will broadcast live from Baltimore on Monday, beginning at 7 a.m., with anchors Paula Zahn and Harry Smith at the Maryland Science Center and Mr. McEwen reporting from his alma mater, Arundel High School.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kris Appel | October 28, 2010
Stroke is a devastating disease. It is sudden, unlike cancer and diabetes, and it can happen to anyone, anytime, at any age. And it is common, affecting 4 out of 5 American families, according to the American Stroke Association. Yet stroke remains mostly hidden, out of the mainstream, neglected by the major fundraising events and ignored by the media. Consider these statistics from the American Heart Association: Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability and the third-leading cause of death.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
One of Maryland's own celebrates a decade on CBS this year.Ten years of getting up in the wee hours has made Mark McEwen, co-host of the network's "This Morning" program, the dean of early-morning TV (that, and Joan Lunden's decision to retire earlier this year). And it's a distinction that leaves the 43-year-old McEwen, whose parents still live in Anne Arundel County, unsure how to react."Sometimes I chuckle at the longevity," McEwen says over the phone from his New York office. "It's something that you don't think about.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 29, 2009
Mark McEwen, the affable television weatherman who had 16 years with the CBS morning show and who once was listed among the 10 most trusted people in the industry by TV Guide, was twice a contestant on "Celebrity Jeopardy." He won it both times, too - an impressive accomplishment even if Cheech Marin and Rob Schneider were among Mr. McEwen's opponents. So, the other night, while we're talking on the phone about the stroke that ended Mr. McEwen's television career, he asks if I like trivia.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2003
Police academy graduations around here usually feature keynote speeches by law enforcement types, such as the police chief or the director of a police training program. So it was more than a little unusual to see a television celebrity imparting words of wisdom to the Anne Arundel County Police Department's 60th recruit class this week. Mark McEwen, who hosts A&E's Live by Request and was a regular on CBS morning shows for 16 years, befriended county police officers in October 2001, when he spotted four of their squad cars parked outside the CBS studios in New York City.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 19, 1992
If you went to Arundel High in the early 1970s, you might recognize that fellow who keeps popping up all over the place during CBS' morning Olympics shows. He's Mark McEwen, whose parents still live in Crownsville.Being on the road is nothing new for McEwen, weatherman for "CBS This Morning," whose past assignments have included swimming underwater in a shark tank and batting against Orel Hershiser. But the Olympics are special, he said."When you travel the road a lot, you are surprised by how much you can get surprised at one particular thing," McEwen said this week.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1997
Good intentions are displayed on ABC tonight. But does that make for good television?"This Morning" (7 a.m.-9 a.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Mark McEwen kicks off his five-part series on volunteerism in America by visiting 15-year-old Amber Coffman of Baltimore, who founded a charity to feed the homeless. CBS."Jeopardy!" (7 p.m.-7: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Anne Arundel County's own Mark McEwen (again) goes up against Rob Schneider and Robin Quivers in the celebrity version of the popular game show, with his winnings going to Maryland's Community Services for Autistic Adults and Children charity.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | August 4, 1996
CHANNEL 13's general manager Marcellus Alexander was the host of a party on the fourth floor patio of the Maryland Science Center. The occasion was to introduce Jane Robelot, Mark McEwen and Jose Diaz-Balart, CBS co-anchors of the new "This Morning" show, to local advertisers and WJZ's morning team, Marty Bass and Don Scott.The CBS celebs were on a tour of key cities to meet local sponsors and personalities. And indeed they did, while enjoying the crab on endive leaves, beef tenderloin strips and shrimp, prepared by Innovative Gourmet.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1995
They say you can't go home again, but that's just what CBS weather forecaster Mark McEwen did yesterday, and he got to take the country with him.He's bragged about his alma mater on the air for years, but the 1972 graduate got to show it off to viewers as he broadcast Monday's weather for "CBS This Morning" from inside his beloved Arundel High School.Anchors Harry Smith and Paula Zahn were at the Maryland Science Center.Mr. McEwen said they've been hearing him talk about the school, and his wrestling coach, for years.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1995
They say you can't go home again, but that's just what CBS weather forecaster Mark McEwen did yesterday, and he got to take the country with him.He's bragged about his alma mater on the air for years, but the 1972 graduate got to show it off to viewers as he broadcast Monday's weather for "CBS This Morning" from inside his beloved Arundel High School.Anchors Harry Smith and Paula Zahn were at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore.Mr. McEwen says they've been hearing him talk about the school, and his wrestling coach, for years.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 4, 2003
Police academy graduations around here usually feature keynote speeches by law enforcement types, such as the police chief or the director of a police training program. So it was more than a little unusual to see a television celebrity imparting words of wisdom to the Anne Arundel County Police Department's 60th recruit class this week. Mark McEwen, who hosts A&E's Live by Request and was a regular on CBS morning shows for 16 years, befriended county police officers in October 2001, when he spotted four of their squad cars parked outside the CBS studios in New York City.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1997
One of Maryland's own celebrates a decade on CBS this year.Ten years of getting up in the wee hours has made Mark McEwen, co-host of the network's "This Morning" program, the dean of early-morning TV (that, and Joan Lunden's decision to retire earlier this year). And it's a distinction that leaves the 43-year-old McEwen, whose parents still live in Anne Arundel County, unsure how to react."Sometimes I chuckle at the longevity," McEwen says over the phone from his New York office. "It's something that you don't think about.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1997
Good intentions are displayed on ABC tonight. But does that make for good television?"This Morning" (7 a.m.-9 a.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Mark McEwen kicks off his five-part series on volunteerism in America by visiting 15-year-old Amber Coffman of Baltimore, who founded a charity to feed the homeless. CBS."Jeopardy!" (7 p.m.-7: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Anne Arundel County's own Mark McEwen (again) goes up against Rob Schneider and Robin Quivers in the celebrity version of the popular game show, with his winnings going to Maryland's Community Services for Autistic Adults and Children charity.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | August 4, 1996
CHANNEL 13's general manager Marcellus Alexander was the host of a party on the fourth floor patio of the Maryland Science Center. The occasion was to introduce Jane Robelot, Mark McEwen and Jose Diaz-Balart, CBS co-anchors of the new "This Morning" show, to local advertisers and WJZ's morning team, Marty Bass and Don Scott.The CBS celebs were on a tour of key cities to meet local sponsors and personalities. And indeed they did, while enjoying the crab on endive leaves, beef tenderloin strips and shrimp, prepared by Innovative Gourmet.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1995
They say you can't go home again, but that's just what CBS weather forecaster Mark McEwen did yesterday, and he got to take the country with him.He's bragged about his alma mater on the air for years, but the 1972 graduate got to show it off to viewers as he broadcast Monday's weather for "CBS This Morning" from inside his beloved Arundel High School.Anchors Harry Smith and Paula Zahn were at the Maryland Science Center.Mr. McEwen said they've been hearing him talk about the school, and his wrestling coach, for years.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1995
They say you can't go home again, but that's just what CBS weather forecaster Mark McEwen did yesterday, and he got to take the country with him.He's bragged about his alma mater on the air for years, but the 1972 graduate got to show it off to viewers as he broadcast Monday's weather for "CBS This Morning" from inside his beloved Arundel High School.Anchors Harry Smith and Paula Zahn were at the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore.Mr. McEwen says they've been hearing him talk about the school, and his wrestling coach, for years.
NEWS
By Kris Appel | October 28, 2010
Stroke is a devastating disease. It is sudden, unlike cancer and diabetes, and it can happen to anyone, anytime, at any age. And it is common, affecting 4 out of 5 American families, according to the American Stroke Association. Yet stroke remains mostly hidden, out of the mainstream, neglected by the major fundraising events and ignored by the media. Consider these statistics from the American Heart Association: Stroke is the leading cause of adult disability and the third-leading cause of death.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 29, 2009
Mark McEwen, the affable television weatherman who had 16 years with the CBS morning show and who once was listed among the 10 most trusted people in the industry by TV Guide, was twice a contestant on "Celebrity Jeopardy." He won it both times, too - an impressive accomplishment even if Cheech Marin and Rob Schneider were among Mr. McEwen's opponents. So, the other night, while we're talking on the phone about the stroke that ended Mr. McEwen's television career, he asks if I like trivia.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1995
Mark McEwen came home yesterday to Baltimore radio, where his broadcast career began.The weather forecaster and entertainment editor of television's "CBS This Morning" dropped by the studios of 98 Rock, WIYY-FM (97.9), to share a microphone for an hour with afternoon personality Kirk McEwen -- his younger brother."CBS This Morning" will broadcast live from Baltimore on Monday, beginning at 7 a.m., with anchors Paula Zahn and Harry Smith at the Maryland Science Center and Mr. McEwen reporting from his alma mater, Arundel High School.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 19, 1992
If you went to Arundel High in the early 1970s, you might recognize that fellow who keeps popping up all over the place during CBS' morning Olympics shows. He's Mark McEwen, whose parents still live in Crownsville.Being on the road is nothing new for McEwen, weatherman for "CBS This Morning," whose past assignments have included swimming underwater in a shark tank and batting against Orel Hershiser. But the Olympics are special, he said."When you travel the road a lot, you are surprised by how much you can get surprised at one particular thing," McEwen said this week.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.