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Mark Hyman

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NEWS
August 22, 2013
Regarding Mark Hyman's recent commentary on relay-running on the West Coast, readers of The Sun might be interested to know that there is a similar relay race held right in our own backyard ( "'An adrenaline junkie's dream,'" Aug. 18). The Ragnar Relay, having the same format as Hood to Coast, is run in numerous locations, including the District of Columbia edition, which starts in Cumberland, Md., and ends at National Harbor. I ran this last year with a team sponsored by my employer, Edaptive Systems LLC, and it was a blast.
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NEWS
August 22, 2013
Regarding Mark Hyman's recent commentary on relay-running on the West Coast, readers of The Sun might be interested to know that there is a similar relay race held right in our own backyard ( "'An adrenaline junkie's dream,'" Aug. 18). The Ragnar Relay, having the same format as Hood to Coast, is run in numerous locations, including the District of Columbia edition, which starts in Cumberland, Md., and ends at National Harbor. I ran this last year with a team sponsored by my employer, Edaptive Systems LLC, and it was a blast.
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NEWS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
"Confessions of a Baseball Purist," by Jon Miller, with Mark Hyman. Simon & Schuster. 269 pages. $24.Move to Baltimore, and two things will happen. Strangers will call you "hon" for no apparent reason. And baseball fans will shake their heads mournfully and say, "You should have heard Jon Miller."If you can imagine Cal Ripken calling in sick, then you can imagine the surprising jolt this city's sports fans felt two years ago when Miller was not offered a new contract and eventually accepted the announcing job for the San Francisco Giants.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Adam Riess, the Nobel Prize-winning astronomy professor at Johns Hopkins University, will discuss the expansion of the universe and its mysteries in an event at Bolton Street Synagogue on Sunday. Riess will present and lead a discussion titled "Exploding Stars, an Expanding Universe and Mysterious Dark Energy" at the Roland Park house of worship. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences recognized him for his work in that area in 2011. He shared the $1.49 million prize with fellow American Saul Perlmutter and U.S.-Australian citizen Brian Schmidt "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae," according to the announcement.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Adam Riess, the Nobel Prize-winning astronomy professor at Johns Hopkins University, will discuss the expansion of the universe and its mysteries in an event at Bolton Street Synagogue on Sunday. Riess will present and lead a discussion titled "Exploding Stars, an Expanding Universe and Mysterious Dark Energy" at the Roland Park house of worship. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences recognized him for his work in that area in 2011. He shared the $1.49 million prize with fellow American Saul Perlmutter and U.S.-Australian citizen Brian Schmidt "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae," according to the announcement.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman All-Star sites and Mark Hyman All-Star sites,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
On deck, Camden Yards.The All-Star Game, baseball's annual showcase of 20-game winners and .300 hitters, is inching its way to Baltimore.Tuesday, the National and American League stars meet in San Diego, where they'll play before a sellout crowd of Bermuda shorts and Day-Glo hats at Jack Murphy Stadium.That will clear the way for the game Orioles fans have been waiting for since the city last played host to the star-filled game in 1958, or two years before the birth of Cal Ripken.Baltimore's All-Star Game will be played July 13, 1993, which would seem to give local organizers enough time to hang bunting, rent banquet rooms and arrange for the seemingly endless series of special events that precede the main event.
BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
Although not as well known as Bill O'Reilly or Sean Hannity, Mark Hyman has made a name for himself with his fiery conservative commentaries on dozens of television stations owned by Hunt Valley's Sinclair Broadcast Group. Yesterday, Hyman, 48, announced that he plans to drop his daily commentary, known as "The Point," at the end of the month to spend more time with his four children. "I want to focus more on family activities and recharge my batteries," Hyman said in a telephone interview.
SPORTS
October 7, 1991
Baseball commissioner Fay Vincent was among the VIPs who attended the final game. He sat in a field box beside the Orioles dugout, and he spoke affectionately of the ballpark he visited often during the 1970s, when he worked in Washington."
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
NEW YORK - For the briefest of moments yesterday, Mark Hyman looked forlorn as he futilely made calls on a cell phone in a vacant hotel banquet room. The conservative television editorialist for Sinclair Broadcast Group had just wrapped up a sit-down interview with Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. But he hasn't been able to secure time with Sen. Olympia Snowe of Maine. And, during a weekend of major protests against this week's Republican National Convention, Hyman hadn't received even a single response to his telephone calls to the chief anti-war coalition.
NEWS
By Mark Hyman | October 29, 2004
YES, MY NAME is Mark Hyman. I was afraid you'd have that reaction. Until recently, I was quite satisfied with my name, which appeared on numerous news and sports articles during my 10 years as a reporter for The Sun, as well as on personal checks, pizza delivery orders and my subscription to Junior Baseball magazine. I would go so far as to say that life was good as Mark Hyman. The walls haven't exactly come crashing down, but these are trying times for someone named Mark Hyman. And for that I have no choice but to point an accusing finger at none other than Mark Hyman.
BUSINESS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | November 3, 2006
Although not as well known as Bill O'Reilly or Sean Hannity, Mark Hyman has made a name for himself with his fiery conservative commentaries on dozens of television stations owned by Hunt Valley's Sinclair Broadcast Group. Yesterday, Hyman, 48, announced that he plans to drop his daily commentary, known as "The Point," at the end of the month to spend more time with his four children. "I want to focus more on family activities and recharge my batteries," Hyman said in a telephone interview.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2004
NEW YORK - For the briefest of moments yesterday, Mark Hyman looked forlorn as he futilely made calls on a cell phone in a vacant hotel banquet room. The conservative television editorialist for Sinclair Broadcast Group had just wrapped up a sit-down interview with Maryland Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. But he hasn't been able to secure time with Sen. Olympia Snowe of Maine. And, during a weekend of major protests against this week's Republican National Convention, Hyman hadn't received even a single response to his telephone calls to the chief anti-war coalition.
NEWS
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1998
"Confessions of a Baseball Purist," by Jon Miller, with Mark Hyman. Simon & Schuster. 269 pages. $24.Move to Baltimore, and two things will happen. Strangers will call you "hon" for no apparent reason. And baseball fans will shake their heads mournfully and say, "You should have heard Jon Miller."If you can imagine Cal Ripken calling in sick, then you can imagine the surprising jolt this city's sports fans felt two years ago when Miller was not offered a new contract and eventually accepted the announcing job for the San Francisco Giants.
SPORTS
By Mark Hyman All-Star sites and Mark Hyman All-Star sites,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
On deck, Camden Yards.The All-Star Game, baseball's annual showcase of 20-game winners and .300 hitters, is inching its way to Baltimore.Tuesday, the National and American League stars meet in San Diego, where they'll play before a sellout crowd of Bermuda shorts and Day-Glo hats at Jack Murphy Stadium.That will clear the way for the game Orioles fans have been waiting for since the city last played host to the star-filled game in 1958, or two years before the birth of Cal Ripken.Baltimore's All-Star Game will be played July 13, 1993, which would seem to give local organizers enough time to hang bunting, rent banquet rooms and arrange for the seemingly endless series of special events that precede the main event.
SPORTS
October 7, 1991
Baseball commissioner Fay Vincent was among the VIPs who attended the final game. He sat in a field box beside the Orioles dugout, and he spoke affectionately of the ballpark he visited often during the 1970s, when he worked in Washington."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2009
Becoming Billie Holiday Poems by Carol Boston Weatherford, art by Floyd Cooper Wordsong / 117 pages / $19.95 These brief, first-person poems tell the story of Eleanora Fagan, who grew up impoverished on Durham Street in a rough East Baltimore neighborhood, yet became a world-renowned jazz singer. With little education and no vocal training, Billie Holiday (she changed her name when she began singing) had an obsessive love for jazz, an excellent ear for rhythm and a voice that was almost able to float.
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