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By STEVE MCKERROW | January 19, 1991
It's certainly not "The Maltese Falcon" nor "Chinatown," and it's a somewhat thin echo of "The Thin Man" series. But a new Showtime movie premiering this weekend on the pay-cable network still manages to engagingly straddle the noir and caper genres of those respective detective films.What's more (for those who care about such things), the hunky buns factor is pretty high in "Fourth Story" (at 9 tonight with repeats through the month). Star Mark Harmon -- he was once People magazine's sexiest man -- parades around in the buff for a good five minutes midway through the film.
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By Los Angeles Times | March 28, 2009
Series Law & Order: : Criminal Intent: : The apparent suicide of a student at an elite private school proves to be a homicide. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) NCIS:: A high-ranking senator wants Gibbs (Mark Harmon) to investigate the mysterious death of a young female naval officer. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Movies Ben-Hur:: Eleven Oscars went to this 1959 epic about childhood friends, a Jew (Charlton Heston) and a Roman (Stephen Boyd), who become enemies during the time of Christ. (8 p.m., TCM)
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April 8, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Gibbs (Mark Harmon) and the team stake out a warehouse to catch a suspected thief on NCIS (8 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13).
FEATURES
May 20, 2008
Critic's Pick -- Gibbs (Mark Harmon) and his team risk their lives to catch a killer in the two-hour season finale of NCIS (8 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13).
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 28, 2009
Series Law & Order: : Criminal Intent: : The apparent suicide of a student at an elite private school proves to be a homicide. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) NCIS:: A high-ranking senator wants Gibbs (Mark Harmon) to investigate the mysterious death of a young female naval officer. (9 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Movies Ben-Hur:: Eleven Oscars went to this 1959 epic about childhood friends, a Jew (Charlton Heston) and a Roman (Stephen Boyd), who become enemies during the time of Christ. (8 p.m., TCM)
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | August 30, 1995
"Magic in the Water" is an optimistic title.The discouraging truth is that those who profess a thirst for family movies should visit "Babe" or, if they can find it, "A Little Princess." Those who insist on discovering "Magic in the Water" for themselves will learn some hard lessons:* Some actors are better-suited to the small screen.* Some creatures are better left to the imagination.* Some movies about children who believe in seaside magic are as haunting as "The Secret of Roan Inish" -- others just put you to sleep.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1995
Only one series premieres tonight, as ABC's "Charlie Grace" brings back one of television's "hunks," Mark Harmon. The Maryland Public Television series "MotorWeek" also reaches a significant milestone.* "Seinfeld" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- What's up with this? Did you notice the suc cessful sitcom still airing in first-run on NBC is now in daily rerun syndication?* "Charlie Grace" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Mark Harmon ("Reasonable Doubts," "St. Elsewhere") returns to series TV as a Los Angeles private investigator, a former cop. His character has tough cases to solve and a 12-year-old daughter to raise.
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By Fort Worth Star-Telegram | January 4, 1991
If it wasn't for made-for-television movies, we might all have a very distorted recollection of our own history.For example: You probably thought the 1930s gangster John Dillinger was a bad guy. You might even believe that he was an ordinary man who simply went bad. It might have crossed your mind that he wasn't all that sexy either.Wrong.Sunday night, ABC sets the record straight with "Dillinger," a two-hour movie (9 p.m., Channel 13) starring that brooding, menacing, wrong-side-of-the-tracks actor, Mark Harmon.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 9, 2004
Expand Roman Holiday to include all of Europe and you have Chasing Liberty, starring Mandy Moore as a first daughter who yearns for the freedom her parents' status won't allow. The formula is ancient - a member of the ruling nobility wants to live as the common folk do - and it's been a winner for everyone from Mark Twain to Audrey Hepburn. Not surprisingly, it works here, too, at least most of the time. The movie's biggest failing may be its effort to make the heroine everything to everybody; she comes across as both perfect and fallible, a combination that, beyond being logically impossible, puts unfair demands on the actor.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 9, 2004
Expand Roman Holiday to include all of Europe and you have Chasing Liberty, starring Mandy Moore as a first daughter who yearns for the freedom her parents' status won't allow. The formula is ancient - a member of the ruling nobility wants to live as the common folk do - and it's been a winner for everyone from Mark Twain to Audrey Hepburn. Not surprisingly, it works here, too, at least most of the time. The movie's biggest failing may be its effort to make the heroine everything to everybody; she comes across as both perfect and fallible, a combination that, beyond being logically impossible, puts unfair demands on the actor.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1998
HBO wants everyone to know that going to the moon made for one heck of an adventure.So the cable network handed Tom Hanks about $60 million and an executive producer title, and asked him to tell the story of America's frenzied moon-dash, otherwise known as the Apollo space program. The result is a 12-part miniseries debuting tomorrow night (and continuing Sundays through May 10, with two one-hour-long parts each night) that gets the adventure right, but -- judging by the four episodes made available to critics -- glosses over the details that made Apollo so much more.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | September 14, 1995
Only one series premieres tonight, as ABC's "Charlie Grace" brings back one of television's "hunks," Mark Harmon. The Maryland Public Television series "MotorWeek" also reaches a significant milestone.* "Seinfeld" (7:30 p.m.-8 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- What's up with this? Did you notice the suc cessful sitcom still airing in first-run on NBC is now in daily rerun syndication?* "Charlie Grace" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Mark Harmon ("Reasonable Doubts," "St. Elsewhere") returns to series TV as a Los Angeles private investigator, a former cop. His character has tough cases to solve and a 12-year-old daughter to raise.
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | August 30, 1995
"Magic in the Water" is an optimistic title.The discouraging truth is that those who profess a thirst for family movies should visit "Babe" or, if they can find it, "A Little Princess." Those who insist on discovering "Magic in the Water" for themselves will learn some hard lessons:* Some actors are better-suited to the small screen.* Some creatures are better left to the imagination.* Some movies about children who believe in seaside magic are as haunting as "The Secret of Roan Inish" -- others just put you to sleep.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | September 26, 1991
Mark Harmon can act.Go ahead, laugh. I don't expect you to take my word for anything that sounds so preposterous, especially given the consistently wretched work he's done in made-for-TV movies the past couple of years.But just for the heck of it, take a look at "Reasonable Doubts," the new NBC drama starring Harmon and Marlee Matlin, which premieres at 10 tonight on WMAR-TV (Channel 2). It's one of the most pleasant surprises of the new season. And Harmon's work as Richard (Dicky) Cobb, a hard-nosed, law-and-order Chicago police detective, is in large part responsible.
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