Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMark Geier
IN THE NEWS

Mark Geier

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
The Maryland panel that oversees doctors in the state has charged a man with practicing medicine without a license just weeks after his father's license was suspended for putting autistic children at risk. The Maryland Board of Physicians says David Geier worked with his father, Dr. Mark Geier, at the Rockville and Owings Mills offices of Genetic Consultants of Maryland, where they used a drug therapy that autism experts say is based on junk science. The pair has built a national following among parents who believe autism is linked to the mercury in vaccines, a theory discredited by mainstream medicine.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Two years after a Maryland doctor lost his medical license for using a controversial treatment for autistic patients, the state Board of Physicians has suspended his business partner for allegedly writing the same dangerous prescription for several patients. The board suspended John L. Young's license to practice medicine in the state Feb. 13. On Feb. 21, Young resigned from his post on the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents, citing a desire to "devote more time to other activities.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley removed David A. Geier from Maryland's Commission on Autism on Friday, telling his one-time appointee in a letter that "you do not at the present time qualify to serve. " O'Malley told Geier, who has only a bachelor's degree, that he does not qualify under Maryland law to serve as a "diagnostician," the title he held on the advisory commission. The governor also cited charges brought against him this week by the Maryland Board of Physicians. "I regret that you were not willing to withdraw from the Commission and that this action is therefore necessary," the governor said.
NEWS
By Mark Geier | June 16, 2011
If there's a single statement that everyone who works in the field of autism can agree on, it's that there is so much that we still don't know. Medical professionals can't even definitively say why more children are being diagnosed as having autism or similar developmental delays, much less agree on the best courses of treatment and therapy. Yet all of us who work with families of children with autism can't help but be affected by the emotions of desperate parents. This month, I go before an administrative law judge to appeal a decision by the Maryland Board of Physicians to summarily suspend my medical license related to the treatment of children with autism.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2011
A day after Dr. Mark Geier's medical license was suspended in Maryland over allegations of putting children with autism at risk, state officials were seeking to remove his son from a state commission that advises the governor on the disorder. The officials were also struggling to explain why David Geier, who has an undergraduate degree in biology and does not have a medical license, was identified by the Commission on Autism as its "diagnostician. " The commission's website had listed him as a doctor until Wednesday, which officials said was a clerical error.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Since Sam Wessels was diagnosed with autism at age 2, doctors have offered his mother a litany of drugs for the boy from Prozac and Ritalin to Metadate CD and Strattera, commonly used to treat ADHD. Other "alternative" medicine pitches have included special diets and even nicotine. "This is the best you can do?" Sam's mother Lin Wessels wondered. Wessels, like many parents, has waded through a lot of legitimate — but much more illegitimate — research on therapies in the struggle with autism, which affects 1 in 110 children and has no cure.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
After her daughter Jodie was diagnosed with autism, Alison Singer went online, searching desperately for anything that looked like it might help her little girl. She tried gluten-free and casein-free diets and supplements. She sprinkled something called DMG on her daughter's French toast. She even heard from a doctor who suggested buying a giant electromagnet that could reorganize ions in the brain. "Parents are very vulnerable when their children are diagnosed. They want to do anything and everything to help their children, and they fall prey to these charlatans peddling the 'cure du jour,'" said Singer, who lives in Scarsdale, N.Y. Singer's experience illustrates the frustration that often drives parents of autistic children to alternative treatments — including a controversial regimen by a Maryland doctor whose license was suspended recently by the Maryland Board of Physicians.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
You have to believe in cosmic justice when you hear about the case of Mark Geier, the doctor whose license to practice was suspended recently after the Maryland Board of Physicians ruled that his bizarre treatment regimen "endangers autistic children and exploits their parents. " If, like me, you don't know much about autism, let me explain where the cosmic justice comes in: One form of the wide-ranging developmental disorder, on the high-functioning, high-verbal end of it, is Asperger's syndrome, which among other things is characterized by a tendency to obsess on a single subject.
HEALTH
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Two years after a Maryland doctor lost his medical license for using a controversial treatment for autistic patients, the state Board of Physicians has suspended his business partner for allegedly writing the same dangerous prescription for several patients. The board suspended John L. Young's license to practice medicine in the state Feb. 13. On Feb. 21, Young resigned from his post on the University System of Maryland's Board of Regents, citing a desire to "devote more time to other activities.
NEWS
By Mark Geier | June 16, 2011
If there's a single statement that everyone who works in the field of autism can agree on, it's that there is so much that we still don't know. Medical professionals can't even definitively say why more children are being diagnosed as having autism or similar developmental delays, much less agree on the best courses of treatment and therapy. Yet all of us who work with families of children with autism can't help but be affected by the emotions of desperate parents. This month, I go before an administrative law judge to appeal a decision by the Maryland Board of Physicians to summarily suspend my medical license related to the treatment of children with autism.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
Since Sam Wessels was diagnosed with autism at age 2, doctors have offered his mother a litany of drugs for the boy from Prozac and Ritalin to Metadate CD and Strattera, commonly used to treat ADHD. Other "alternative" medicine pitches have included special diets and even nicotine. "This is the best you can do?" Sam's mother Lin Wessels wondered. Wessels, like many parents, has waded through a lot of legitimate — but much more illegitimate — research on therapies in the struggle with autism, which affects 1 in 110 children and has no cure.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Gov. Martin O'Malley removed David A. Geier from Maryland's Commission on Autism on Friday, telling his one-time appointee in a letter that "you do not at the present time qualify to serve. " O'Malley told Geier, who has only a bachelor's degree, that he does not qualify under Maryland law to serve as a "diagnostician," the title he held on the advisory commission. The governor also cited charges brought against him this week by the Maryland Board of Physicians. "I regret that you were not willing to withdraw from the Commission and that this action is therefore necessary," the governor said.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
The Maryland panel that oversees doctors in the state has charged a man with practicing medicine without a license just weeks after his father's license was suspended for putting autistic children at risk. The Maryland Board of Physicians says David Geier worked with his father, Dr. Mark Geier, at the Rockville and Owings Mills offices of Genetic Consultants of Maryland, where they used a drug therapy that autism experts say is based on junk science. The pair has built a national following among parents who believe autism is linked to the mercury in vaccines, a theory discredited by mainstream medicine.
HEALTH
By Frank D. Roylance and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2011
After her daughter Jodie was diagnosed with autism, Alison Singer went online, searching desperately for anything that looked like it might help her little girl. She tried gluten-free and casein-free diets and supplements. She sprinkled something called DMG on her daughter's French toast. She even heard from a doctor who suggested buying a giant electromagnet that could reorganize ions in the brain. "Parents are very vulnerable when their children are diagnosed. They want to do anything and everything to help their children, and they fall prey to these charlatans peddling the 'cure du jour,'" said Singer, who lives in Scarsdale, N.Y. Singer's experience illustrates the frustration that often drives parents of autistic children to alternative treatments — including a controversial regimen by a Maryland doctor whose license was suspended recently by the Maryland Board of Physicians.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
You have to believe in cosmic justice when you hear about the case of Mark Geier, the doctor whose license to practice was suspended recently after the Maryland Board of Physicians ruled that his bizarre treatment regimen "endangers autistic children and exploits their parents. " If, like me, you don't know much about autism, let me explain where the cosmic justice comes in: One form of the wide-ranging developmental disorder, on the high-functioning, high-verbal end of it, is Asperger's syndrome, which among other things is characterized by a tendency to obsess on a single subject.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2011
A day after Dr. Mark Geier's medical license was suspended in Maryland over allegations of putting children with autism at risk, state officials were seeking to remove his son from a state commission that advises the governor on the disorder. The officials were also struggling to explain why David Geier, who has an undergraduate degree in biology and does not have a medical license, was identified by the Commission on Autism as its "diagnostician. " The commission's website had listed him as a doctor until Wednesday, which officials said was a clerical error.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2012
Dr. Mark R. Geier, a Rockville doctor accused of improperly treating children with autism, has been ordered by the state Board of Physicians to stop practicing medicine while his license is suspended. The doctor's license was suspended in April after the board concluded his hormone and chelation therapy endangered the children in his care. But the board in a new "cease and desist" order this week accused the doctor of refilling prescriptions for at least three patients in violation of the suspension.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.