Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMark Fuhrman
IN THE NEWS

Mark Fuhrman

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 15, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- F. Lee Bailey, the legal legend reborn in the O. J. Simpson case, again hammered away yesterday at Mark Fuhrman, the police detective the defense deems the Achilles' heel of the prosecution. But despite suggestions that he was a bigot and a liar, Detective Fuhrman again held his own, returning Mr. Bailey's slams with gentle, soft-spoken lobs.Once more, Mr. Bailey steered clear of stating explicitly that Detective Fuhrman planted the glove that he has said he found behind Mr. Simpson's house.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kim Murphy and Kim Murphy,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2001
SPOKANE, Wash. - Look out, cops. Somebody gave Mark Fuhrman a microphone and 5,000 watts of broadcasting power. Twice a week, the Los Angeles Police Department's most famous former detective goes on KXLY-AM with his two-hour news radio call-in program, All About Crime, and if criminals think they're in for it, wait till you hear what he has to say about the police. This week: the Chandra Levy case and Rep. Gary A. Condit. "Washington, D.C. - it's not the place you want to be investigated if you're dead," Fuhrman declared.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | September 1, 1995
Rogue cop Mark Fuhrman may have ruined the prosecutors' case in the O. J. trial, but he sure saved the show.He's the best TV villain since J. R.'s days on "Dallas," if slightly less believable.Let's face it, the O. J. trial was dragging. It was all DNA this and PCR that. One side's experts debunking the other side's experts. I longed for the early, halcyon days of the trial, when we had real characters. There was the feisty, Latina housekeeper and the dim-witted, blond houseboy. Even a wailing dog beats scientists.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | November 19, 1995
Marc Steiner has his game face on.It is 30 seconds to air time, and the WJHU talk-show host, usually lively and animated, is so still he appears to be meditating. He may not get as nervous as he did when he started the show 2 1/2 years ago, but today's is a tough one, a telephone discussion with Dinesh D'Souza. Mr. D'Souza's latest book, "The End of Racism," which argues that white racism is not the real problem facing black Americans, is perfect for a call-in radio show, controversial and current.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 22, 1995
As a former Marine and a former Baltimore City police detective, Jim Dunphy, 65, is extremely well-qualified for what he does every day:He watches the O. J. Simpson trial.And his assessment thus far?"I wouldn't let F. Lee Bailey represent me on a traffic ticket," Dunphy said.But as the entire free world knows, Bailey, too, was a Marine. So what about loyalty to a fellow Leatherneck and Semper Fi and all that?"I wouldn't let Bailey represent me on a parking ticket," Dunphy said.Dunphy bases this pungent (and I would say correct)
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 8, 1995
Both sides in the O. J. Simpson case have made plenty of mistakes.But whether she wins or loses (and who's kidding whom about whether Simpson is going to walk), Prosecutor Marcia Clark is not going to look back with much pride on how she handled Mark Fuhrman's invocation of this Fifth Amendment rights on Wednesday.There is, before we begin, one thing we should keep in mindabout the Fifth Amendment: It is a constitutional right. It is your right, my right, Mark Fuhrman's right and O. J. Simpson's right.
NEWS
By Roger Simon and Roger Simon,Sun Columnist | March 10, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- O. J. Simpson's eyes never left Mark Fuhrman. Not when Fuhrman refused to meet his glare, not even when Fuhrman turned away.Simpson continued to stare, his eyes burning into Fuhrman's broad back as Fuhrman walked across the front of the courtroom to the witness chair.Simpson grasped the arms of his own chair at the defense table as if he were going to rise, stride across the courtroom and confront Fuhrman physically.He did not do so. And even if he had lost control, the sheriff's deputies who always hover near Simpson would not have let him get very far.But if looks could kill . . .No. Scratch that.
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
Aftershocks from the O. J. Simpson trial are being felt for thousands of miles, damaging the credibility of police across the nation, top police officials from the Baltimore area said yesterday."
NEWS
By ELLEN GAMERMAN and ELLEN GAMERMAN,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- O. J. Simpson never surfaced at the Million Man March, but the same cannot be said of feelings generated by his double-murder trial.The racial tensions exposed by the Simpson case were apparent at the demonstration here yesterday. Vendors were selling out of O. J. Simpson-related merchandise, such as shirts that read "O. J.'s Free."More than 100 men from St. Louis marched in black baseball caps with the words "Not Guilty" stiched in red.And in speeches meant to unify black men, both Jesse L. Jackson and Louis Farrakhan drew on the nation's racially split reactions to the Simpson verdict.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 1, 1995
So now, in the dying hours of the O.J. Simpson murder case, when you think you've learned everything there is to be learned about this man, we have one last bit of evidence thrown at us in the cause of his defense:O.J. Simpson is accused of being a halfback.At such a declaration, the earnestness spills from attorney Johnnie L. Cochran's pores. Halfbacks aren't aggressors, Cochran reminds us. Their job is to avoid contact. Who ever heard of a halfback being a hacker of innocent people? Everybody knows halfbacks don't do such things.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | October 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- At times, it felt like some village filling agreat African plain with the ritual sounds of ancient celebration. The drums talking in deep, resonant tones, a flute floating high above like a great bird, men chanting in time to the pulse beat of the drum.At times, it felt like a revival meeting under a tent on a street corner in a bad neighborhood. Voices rising like tides, cadences flowing like rivers, the preachers calling and the people responding, shouting themselves hoarse, shouting salvation, their fists punching into a hard autumn sky.At times, it felt like a shaky bipartisan deal, a political truce as fragile as a Bosnian cease-fire.
NEWS
By ELLEN GAMERMAN and ELLEN GAMERMAN,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- O. J. Simpson never surfaced at the Million Man March, but the same cannot be said of feelings generated by his double-murder trial.The racial tensions exposed by the Simpson case were apparent at the demonstration here yesterday. Vendors were selling out of O. J. Simpson-related merchandise, such as shirts that read "O. J.'s Free."More than 100 men from St. Louis marched in black baseball caps with the words "Not Guilty" stiched in red.And in speeches meant to unify black men, both Jesse L. Jackson and Louis Farrakhan drew on the nation's racially split reactions to the Simpson verdict.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON and CARL M. CANNON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 1995
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, used the occasion of yesterday's Million Man March to call on whites -- and blacks -- to "clean our house of racism."He did so, however, far from the huge Washington rally.Before a friendly audience at the University of Texas at Austin, Mr. Clinton praised the message of the march -- and the marchers -- while criticizing its keynote speaker, Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan.Mr. Clinton also offered some stark observations about racial perceptions in the United States.
NEWS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
Aftershocks from the O. J. Simpson trial are being felt for thousands of miles, damaging the credibility of police across the nation, top police officials from the Baltimore area said yesterday."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 5, 1995
BOSTON -- For weeks, I have been struck by two African-American men who dominated the news. One was O.J. Simpson. The other was, of course, Colin Powell. One was a former football hero and the other a retired general. One was on trial for murder, the other on a trial run for the White House.Colin Powell called his autobiography about his rise from humble Harlem, public school, ROTC, origins, ''My American Journey.'' O.J. Simpson's story is also an American journey, about the rise and fall -- and now rescue -- of a ''hero.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 4, 1995
They clustered around an Emerson television set so old it barely picked up a local station and the color picture had turned to an insipid black and white. There were six of them -- all black, in their 20s and barbers at the AfriCentrics Braiders and Barber Salon on Howard Street.They hovered in suspense just before the court clerk in the O.J. Simpson case read the verdict that brought an end to the Trial From Hell. With the words "Not guilty," the place erupted. One leaped into the air. Some exchanged high fives while others dashed through the door onto Howard Street to share their vicarious victory with the world.
NEWS
By Roger Simon and Roger Simon,Sun Columnist | March 15, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- The defense may never rest, but it can run around in circles.And that is how defense attorney F. Lee Bailey spent a second day of cross-examination with Los Angeles police Detective Mark Fuhrman.Bailey had bragged to reporters that his cross-examination of Fuhrman was going to be a "character assassination." But it is an open question as to whose reputation is suffering more.Bailey has not tried a really high-profile case since defending Patty Hearst in 1976 on bank robbery charges.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 5, 1995
BOSTON -- For weeks, I have been struck by two African-American men who dominated the news. One was O.J. Simpson. The other was, of course, Colin Powell. One was a former football hero and the other a retired general. One was on trial for murder, the other on a trial run for the White House.Colin Powell called his autobiography about his rise from humble Harlem, public school, ROTC, origins, ''My American Journey.'' O.J. Simpson's story is also an American journey, about the rise and fall -- and now rescue -- of a ''hero.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 1, 1995
So now, in the dying hours of the O.J. Simpson murder case, when you think you've learned everything there is to be learned about this man, we have one last bit of evidence thrown at us in the cause of his defense:O.J. Simpson is accused of being a halfback.At such a declaration, the earnestness spills from attorney Johnnie L. Cochran's pores. Halfbacks aren't aggressors, Cochran reminds us. Their job is to avoid contact. Who ever heard of a halfback being a hacker of innocent people? Everybody knows halfbacks don't do such things.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | September 13, 1995
Is it possible that someone could have a kind word for Mark Fuhrman, the liar and bigot of N-word fame? The braggart ex-cop whose big mouth is O.J. Simpson's best hope to beat the rap?Sure. This is a big country with all sorts of opinions. And far worse villains than Fuhrman had admirers. As I recall, even John Wayne Gacy received love letters.So I wasn't surprised to receive a spirited defense of Fuhrman. And since he's been so battered in the media, it seems only fair to pass along a pro-Fuhrman viewpoint.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.