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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2004
Some poets are so finely attuned to their surroundings that their writing can border on prophecy. A striking example of this occurred in 1857, when Walt Whitman, pondering the future of the nation he loved, conjured the image of the "Redeemer President of These States." In a political tract called The Eighteenth Presidency!, Whitman yearned for a new kind of leader. He'd be pleased, he wrote, to see "some heroic, shrewd, fully-informed, healthy-bodied, middle-aged, beard-faced American blacksmith or boatman come down from the West ... and walk into the Presidency, dressed in a clean suit of working attire, and with the tan all over his face, breast and arms."
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Dolores Jane "Dollie" Epstein, a former office worker and master seamstress, died Monday of multiple organ failure at her Lutherville home. She was 79. The daughter of an accountant and a homemaker, the former Dolores Jane "Dollie" Moeller was born in Baltimore and raised on Gibbons Avenue in Hamilton. She was a graduate of Clara Barton Vocational High School, where she studied to become a master seamstress. After her marriage to Robert I. Epstein, a mechanical engineer, in 1959, the coupled settled on Tunbridge Road in Homeland, where they raised their seven children.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
The girl-poet from Camden, Maine, scattered words behind her like bits of bread. Perhaps they were meant to mark her trail so she could find her way back home. Or, perhaps she intended all along to create a feast for the birds. Two biographers, Daniel Mark Epstein and Nancy Milford, have picked up each crumb that Edna St. Vincent Millay dropped on her path. Besides the late poet and her younger sister, Norma, they are the only two people ever to have read Millay's private diaries and voluminous correspondence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2009
Kitchens, Smokehouses, and Privies By Michael Olmert Cornell University Press / 277 pages / $27.95 Contrary to popular usage, outhouses are not synonymous with privies. As Michael Olmert explains it in this lighthearted architectural history, outhouses or outbuildings include kitchens, smokehouses, dairies, and privies. A professor of English at the University of Maryland and an Emmy-Award-winning writer, Olmert enhances this account with gems of information from art, architecture and literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2009
Kitchens, Smokehouses, and Privies By Michael Olmert Cornell University Press / 277 pages / $27.95 Contrary to popular usage, outhouses are not synonymous with privies. As Michael Olmert explains it in this lighthearted architectural history, outhouses or outbuildings include kitchens, smokehouses, dairies, and privies. A professor of English at the University of Maryland and an Emmy-Award-winning writer, Olmert enhances this account with gems of information from art, architecture and literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and By Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
What Lips My Lips Have Kissed: the Loves and Love Poems of Edna St. Vincent Millay, by Daniel Mark Epstein. Henry Holt & Company. 300 pages. $26. Both Edna St. Vincent Millay and biographer Daniel Mark Epstein deserve my apology. In a recent Sun review of a Millay biography, I credited Nancy Milford, the author of that bio, with having read "all" of Millay's incredibly voluminous correspondence. No way. Epstein's What Lips My Lips Have Kissed is rooted in a prodigious cache of letters stored in the Library of Congress.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Dolores Jane "Dollie" Epstein, a former office worker and master seamstress, died Monday of multiple organ failure at her Lutherville home. She was 79. The daughter of an accountant and a homemaker, the former Dolores Jane "Dollie" Moeller was born in Baltimore and raised on Gibbons Avenue in Hamilton. She was a graduate of Clara Barton Vocational High School, where she studied to become a master seamstress. After her marriage to Robert I. Epstein, a mechanical engineer, in 1959, the coupled settled on Tunbridge Road in Homeland, where they raised their seven children.
NEWS
By Diane Winston | March 14, 1993
SISTER AIMEE: THE LIFE OFAIMEE SEMPLE MCPHERSON.Daniel Mark Epstein.Harcourt Brace & Co.` 475 pages. $27.95.The life of Aimee Semple McPherson defies logical explanation, which is why it is easy to dismiss. To many minds, McPherson, founder of the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel and evangelist extraordinaire of the early decades of the 20th century, is a minor footnote under the broad heading of religion, sex and scandal.Daniel Mark Epstein, a Baltimore writer and poet, saves Sister Aimee (1890-1944)
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | May 18, 2008
The Lincolns Portrait of a Marriage By Daniel Mark Epstein Ballantine Books / 544 pages / $28 Leo Tolstoy was wrong. Happy families are not all alike - nor is every unhappy family unhappy in its own way. Enduring marriages, in fact, are - serially and simultaneously - happy and unhappy. As Daniel Mark Epstein reminds us, they rarely follow "a simple trajectory," proceeding instead "in a jagged arc, as husband and wife agree, disagree, compromise, and experience estrangement and reconciliation in the adventure of their life together."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Pride and Mike Pride,Special to the Sun | January 25, 2004
Lincoln and Whitman: Parallel Lives in Civil War Washington, by Daniel Mark Epstein. Ballantine Books. 400 pages. $24.95. The premise of Daniel Mark Epstein's new book is that the two great voices of mid-19th-century America sang in harmony and that the harmony was no accident. Leaves of Grass, Whitman's major poetic work, unlocked the poetic power of Abraham Lincoln, Epstein argues, and a love of Lincoln provided Whitman with a second act after his masterpiece. That Whitman adored Lincoln -- "I love the president personally," he wrote in his diary in 1863 -- and wrote movingly about him is well-established.
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,[Special to The Sun] | May 18, 2008
The Lincolns Portrait of a Marriage By Daniel Mark Epstein Ballantine Books / 544 pages / $28 Leo Tolstoy was wrong. Happy families are not all alike - nor is every unhappy family unhappy in its own way. Enduring marriages, in fact, are - serially and simultaneously - happy and unhappy. As Daniel Mark Epstein reminds us, they rarely follow "a simple trajectory," proceeding instead "in a jagged arc, as husband and wife agree, disagree, compromise, and experience estrangement and reconciliation in the adventure of their life together."
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | April 13, 2008
For 17 of the 22 years they spent together, Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln cheated the laws of gravity. Their marriage was forged from the heavy materials dug from the earth, yet it was engineered with such precision it could ride on a puff of air. It was only after Lincoln went to the White House, according to Baltimore author Daniel Mark Epstein, that the couple's delicate balance began to lose its equilibrium. Epstein, 59, has chronicled the pair's loving, turbulent relationship in The Lincolns: Portrait of a Marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Pride and Mike Pride,Special to the Sun | January 25, 2004
Lincoln and Whitman: Parallel Lives in Civil War Washington, by Daniel Mark Epstein. Ballantine Books. 400 pages. $24.95. The premise of Daniel Mark Epstein's new book is that the two great voices of mid-19th-century America sang in harmony and that the harmony was no accident. Leaves of Grass, Whitman's major poetic work, unlocked the poetic power of Abraham Lincoln, Epstein argues, and a love of Lincoln provided Whitman with a second act after his masterpiece. That Whitman adored Lincoln -- "I love the president personally," he wrote in his diary in 1863 -- and wrote movingly about him is well-established.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2004
Some poets are so finely attuned to their surroundings that their writing can border on prophecy. A striking example of this occurred in 1857, when Walt Whitman, pondering the future of the nation he loved, conjured the image of the "Redeemer President of These States." In a political tract called The Eighteenth Presidency!, Whitman yearned for a new kind of leader. He'd be pleased, he wrote, to see "some heroic, shrewd, fully-informed, healthy-bodied, middle-aged, beard-faced American blacksmith or boatman come down from the West ... and walk into the Presidency, dressed in a clean suit of working attire, and with the tan all over his face, breast and arms."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and By Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2002
Murdering English-language poets has gone out of style since the days of Christopher Marlowe (in barroom brawl) and Fulke Greville (by enraged employee). Good thing. Poetry is divided into ferociously hostile enemy camps. American poetry wars circa 2002 resemble actual combat in several important ways: * It's hard for noncombatants to understand the battle lines. * Most of the warring camps' passionately held premises are false. * People get hurt. Particularly visible among the poetry-war camps: "Performed poetry" vs. "read poetry"; "formal" vs. free-form poetry; African-American / urban poetry vs. European-American / suburban poetry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | November 25, 2001
Amid the tumults of 2001, this region's authors and publishers have stayed by their keyboards and their cash-flow charts, producing new books for the general reader. Here, accordingly, is the annual try at a census of such works, by Marylanders or about Maryland. (S) means softbound; (O), oversize. Arts The Other Side of Color: African American Art in the Collection of Camille O. and William H. Cosby Jr., by David C. Driskell (Pomegranate, 213 pages, $65). Of the 47 artists represented, the first is Joshua Johnston.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and By Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | May 19, 2002
Murdering English-language poets has gone out of style since the days of Christopher Marlowe (in barroom brawl) and Fulke Greville (by enraged employee). Good thing. Poetry is divided into ferociously hostile enemy camps. American poetry wars circa 2002 resemble actual combat in several important ways: * It's hard for noncombatants to understand the battle lines. * Most of the warring camps' passionately held premises are false. * People get hurt. Particularly visible among the poetry-war camps: "Performed poetry" vs. "read poetry"; "formal" vs. free-form poetry; African-American / urban poetry vs. European-American / suburban poetry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | November 25, 2001
Amid the tumults of 2001, this region's authors and publishers have stayed by their keyboards and their cash-flow charts, producing new books for the general reader. Here, accordingly, is the annual try at a census of such works, by Marylanders or about Maryland. (S) means softbound; (O), oversize. Arts The Other Side of Color: African American Art in the Collection of Camille O. and William H. Cosby Jr., by David C. Driskell (Pomegranate, 213 pages, $65). Of the 47 artists represented, the first is Joshua Johnston.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2001
The girl-poet from Camden, Maine, scattered words behind her like bits of bread. Perhaps they were meant to mark her trail so she could find her way back home. Or, perhaps she intended all along to create a feast for the birds. Two biographers, Daniel Mark Epstein and Nancy Milford, have picked up each crumb that Edna St. Vincent Millay dropped on her path. Besides the late poet and her younger sister, Norma, they are the only two people ever to have read Millay's private diaries and voluminous correspondence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Clarinda Harriss and By Clarinda Harriss,Special to the Sun | September 16, 2001
What Lips My Lips Have Kissed: the Loves and Love Poems of Edna St. Vincent Millay, by Daniel Mark Epstein. Henry Holt & Company. 300 pages. $26. Both Edna St. Vincent Millay and biographer Daniel Mark Epstein deserve my apology. In a recent Sun review of a Millay biography, I credited Nancy Milford, the author of that bio, with having read "all" of Millay's incredibly voluminous correspondence. No way. Epstein's What Lips My Lips Have Kissed is rooted in a prodigious cache of letters stored in the Library of Congress.
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