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By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Columnist | February 6, 2007
The 14th season of Survivor kicks off Thursday - the folks are in Fiji. The twist this time around is that one tribe will live in the lap of luxury, while the other will be on its own in the wild. This would all seem so much more interesting if it weren't the exact same twist as on The Apprentice, whose most recent season started last month. Both shows are produced by Mark Burnett, so there's really no excuse for the overlap, either.
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By From Sun news services | October 11, 2008
Slash leaps at chance to honor Les Paul - no strings attached Not wanting to miss a chance to pay tribute to Les Paul, his guitar hero, former Guns N' Roses guitarist Slash signed up to play at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's tribute concert Nov. 15 without even hearing who he'd be playing with on stage. "I'm just coming with my guitar," Slash said. The lineup for the concert at Cleveland's State Theater includes Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top and Richie Sambora of Bon Jovi. Slash, a member of Velvet Revolver, said he'd do anything for the 93-year-old Paul, known as the "Father of the Electric Guitar."
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By Sarah Kickler Kelber | August 26, 2007
Hoopers Island resident Louie Frase was "cut adrift" on Tuesday's episode of Pirate Master. But you might not have noticed, because CBS removed the show from the air on July 24, thanks to flagging ratings. With no fanfare, the show was moved to CBS.com, where it is now described cheerily as an "online exclusive." "I was probably more hurt about having them take it off the air than I was about getting cut adrift last week," he said. Frase's time on the show ended after his partner in Tuesday's challenge, Ben, purposefully slowed them down, throwing the competition so that the other pair, with whom he was allied, would win. But Frase, who says he took home about $28,000 in "treasure," has no regrets.
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By Sarah Kickler Kelber | August 26, 2007
Hoopers Island resident Louie Frase was "cut adrift" on Tuesday's episode of Pirate Master. But you might not have noticed, because CBS removed the show from the air on July 24, thanks to flagging ratings. With no fanfare, the show was moved to CBS.com, where it is now described cheerily as an "online exclusive." "I was probably more hurt about having them take it off the air than I was about getting cut adrift last week," he said. Frase's time on the show ended after his partner in Tuesday's challenge, Ben, purposefully slowed them down, throwing the competition so that the other pair, with whom he was allied, would win. But Frase, who says he took home about $28,000 in "treasure," has no regrets.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | October 11, 2008
Slash leaps at chance to honor Les Paul - no strings attached Not wanting to miss a chance to pay tribute to Les Paul, his guitar hero, former Guns N' Roses guitarist Slash signed up to play at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's tribute concert Nov. 15 without even hearing who he'd be playing with on stage. "I'm just coming with my guitar," Slash said. The lineup for the concert at Cleveland's State Theater includes Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top and Richie Sambora of Bon Jovi. Slash, a member of Velvet Revolver, said he'd do anything for the 93-year-old Paul, known as the "Father of the Electric Guitar."
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By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2005
Ever wonder how Mark Burnett - the man behind such hit reality shows as Survivor and The Apprentice - rose from working-class origins in London to live the American dream (that is, to make loads of money in television and party with celebrities)? He thought so. Lucky for you, Burnett chronicles his story in his new book, Jump In! Even If You Don't Know How to Swim, released last week. Part autobiography, part motivational guide, the book purports to offer lessons from a life as improbable as, say, ending up on a tropical island with 15 other "castaways" and a host named Jeff Probst.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 19, 2003
The Restaurant, a six-part reality series premiering tomorrow night on NBC, is being promoted by the network as a "behind-the-scenes look" at a celebrity chef's efforts to open a new Manhattan eatery. It is all of that, but so much more. Just as American Idol is as much about democracy and the American Dream as it is singing, The Restaurant is as much about 9/11, the vitality of New York City and the entrepreneurial spirit of America as it is the perfect pasta. This is a series that at its high end speaks to some of the sweetest spots in the American psyche.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 10, 2001
LOS ANGELES - If anyone still is wondering whether reality television is here to stay, here's the answer - CBS will air "Survivor 3" and "Survivor 4" in 2001 and 2002. As for "Survivor: The Australian Outback," which debuts Jan. 28 following the Super Bowl, football fans be warned: CBS says it's not going to be shy about using the contest as a promotional launching pad for what is expected to be the largest post-game audience in television history. (One-hundred thirty million viewers are expected to tune in the game, the greatest number ever for a single program.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 8, 2004
His bizarre, boxy hairdo is mocked on late-night talk shows. College students parody the overkill of his god-like weekly ritual of pointing his finger at a young person and thundering, "You're fired." Cultural critics says he's become a symbol of the "dorky uber-boss," while taking up residency in a realm of dubious-celebrity that includes Gary Coleman, Richard Hatch and Corey Feldman. And, yet, Donald Trump says his starring role in reality TV's latest phenomenon, NBC's The Apprentice, has been nothing short of great for his image.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 27, 2004
The fall television season doesn't start until Monday, but one of the most talked about new series of the year could find itself canceled today without ever making it on air. And the person pulling the plug would not be a network programmer, but a California judge. In Los Angeles Superior Court today, the summer's nastiest network fight, over a pair of similar reality boxing shows, may come to a conclusion. The months-long bout has involved NBC, Fox and several big-name Hollywood producers battling over The Next Great Champ, set to premiere Sept.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Columnist | February 6, 2007
The 14th season of Survivor kicks off Thursday - the folks are in Fiji. The twist this time around is that one tribe will live in the lap of luxury, while the other will be on its own in the wild. This would all seem so much more interesting if it weren't the exact same twist as on The Apprentice, whose most recent season started last month. Both shows are produced by Mark Burnett, so there's really no excuse for the overlap, either.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2005
Ever wonder how Mark Burnett - the man behind such hit reality shows as Survivor and The Apprentice - rose from working-class origins in London to live the American dream (that is, to make loads of money in television and party with celebrities)? He thought so. Lucky for you, Burnett chronicles his story in his new book, Jump In! Even If You Don't Know How to Swim, released last week. Part autobiography, part motivational guide, the book purports to offer lessons from a life as improbable as, say, ending up on a tropical island with 15 other "castaways" and a host named Jeff Probst.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 27, 2004
The fall television season doesn't start until Monday, but one of the most talked about new series of the year could find itself canceled today without ever making it on air. And the person pulling the plug would not be a network programmer, but a California judge. In Los Angeles Superior Court today, the summer's nastiest network fight, over a pair of similar reality boxing shows, may come to a conclusion. The months-long bout has involved NBC, Fox and several big-name Hollywood producers battling over The Next Great Champ, set to premiere Sept.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 8, 2004
His bizarre, boxy hairdo is mocked on late-night talk shows. College students parody the overkill of his god-like weekly ritual of pointing his finger at a young person and thundering, "You're fired." Cultural critics says he's become a symbol of the "dorky uber-boss," while taking up residency in a realm of dubious-celebrity that includes Gary Coleman, Richard Hatch and Corey Feldman. And, yet, Donald Trump says his starring role in reality TV's latest phenomenon, NBC's The Apprentice, has been nothing short of great for his image.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 19, 2003
The Restaurant, a six-part reality series premiering tomorrow night on NBC, is being promoted by the network as a "behind-the-scenes look" at a celebrity chef's efforts to open a new Manhattan eatery. It is all of that, but so much more. Just as American Idol is as much about democracy and the American Dream as it is singing, The Restaurant is as much about 9/11, the vitality of New York City and the entrepreneurial spirit of America as it is the perfect pasta. This is a series that at its high end speaks to some of the sweetest spots in the American psyche.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 16, 2003
New York -- Early This Summer, a New Restaurant Opened in New York. the Cuisine Was Italian and the Stars of the Menu Included Homespun Favorites Such as Spaghetti and Meatballs and Chicken Parmigiana. Apart from the fact that its chef / owner was Food Network heartthrob Rocco DiSpirito, Rocco's seemed, at first glance, to have little that was exceptional about it. Well, except for the camera crews. And the preternaturally attractive wait staff. And intriguing scenes such as the one last month that went something like this: A bartender opens a fridge and picks up a bottle from a row of carefully arranged Coors Lights.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 16, 2003
New York -- Early This Summer, a New Restaurant Opened in New York. the Cuisine Was Italian and the Stars of the Menu Included Homespun Favorites Such as Spaghetti and Meatballs and Chicken Parmigiana. Apart from the fact that its chef / owner was Food Network heartthrob Rocco DiSpirito, Rocco's seemed, at first glance, to have little that was exceptional about it. Well, except for the camera crews. And the preternaturally attractive wait staff. And intriguing scenes such as the one last month that went something like this: A bartender opens a fridge and picks up a bottle from a row of carefully arranged Coors Lights.
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By David Zurawik | August 30, 2004
Score one for The Next Great Champ. A Los Angeles judge cleared the way for Fox TV's new boxing reality series to debut Sept. 7, refusing to grant a preliminary injunction sought by Mark Burnett and Jeffrey Katzenberg, producers of a rival NBC series, The Contender. Burnett and Katzenberg, whose series is scheduled to premiere in November, sought the injunction on the grounds that Fox had violated California boxing regulations in its rush to get Champ on-air before their show. While that was the core of their court case, the real fight was over the claim by producers and NBC that Fox stole the idea for its boxing series from them.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | January 10, 2001
LOS ANGELES - If anyone still is wondering whether reality television is here to stay, here's the answer - CBS will air "Survivor 3" and "Survivor 4" in 2001 and 2002. As for "Survivor: The Australian Outback," which debuts Jan. 28 following the Super Bowl, football fans be warned: CBS says it's not going to be shy about using the contest as a promotional launching pad for what is expected to be the largest post-game audience in television history. (One-hundred thirty million viewers are expected to tune in the game, the greatest number ever for a single program.
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