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Mark Bowden

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By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
For Mark Bowden, writing a book about the 1958 pro football championship game between the Baltimore Colts and New York Giants was a return to his roots. Bowden made his name writing prize-winning articles for The Philadelphia Inquirer and best-selling books such as Black Hawk Down, his reconstruction of a disastrous U.S. military raid in Somalia, and Killing Pablo, his chronicle of the manhunt for Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar. But before all that came Baltimore. Bowden was 13 when his family moved to town in the mid-1960s.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 21, 2008
For Mark Bowden, writing a book about the 1958 pro football championship game between the Baltimore Colts and New York Giants was a return to his roots. Bowden made his name writing prize-winning articles for The Philadelphia Inquirer and best-selling books such as Black Hawk Down, his reconstruction of a disastrous U.S. military raid in Somalia, and Killing Pablo, his chronicle of the manhunt for Colombian drug lord Pablo Escobar. But before all that came Baltimore. Bowden was 13 when his family moved to town in the mid-1960s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Daniel J. Kornstein and By Daniel J. Kornstein,Special to the Sun | October 13, 2002
Finders Keepers, by Mark Bowden. Atlantic Monthly Press. 208 pages. $23. What might have been a boring account of a botched crime becomes, in Mark Bowden's versatile hands, a taut, fast-paced tale with larger meaning. Finders Keepers is the true story of a pathetic loser who, more than 20 years ago, found $1.2 million that accidentally fell out of an armored car. Joey Coyle was a sad, mixed-up, self-destructive, paranoid high school dropout who at age 28 still lived in his mother's house in South Philadelphia.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America's War With Militant Islam Mark Bowden Atlantic Monthly Press / 704 pages / $26 If the global struggle between tradition and modernity, tribalism and globalism, religious radicals and the world's sole superpower might be traced to a particular moment, it would be a baleful Sunday 27 years ago. On Nov. 4, 1979, hundreds of Iranian students, followers of the Shiite cleric Ayatollah Khomeini, overran and...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2001
"Killing Pablo: The Hunt for the World's Greatest Outlaw," by Mark Bowden. Atlantic Monthly Press. 296 pages. $25. "Plata o plomo." Translated into English, the words mean "money or lead." But in Colombia, the words carried a pernicious message: Take a bribe or take a bullet. That was cocaine czar Pablo Escobar's strategy for running his billion-dollar-a-year trafficking empire for more than a decade. Under his "plata o plomo" doctrine, bribes abounded and bodies piled high. In the wake of movies such as the Oscar-winning "Traffic" that present troubling but fascinating vignettes about the war on drugs, comes Mark Bowden's new non-fiction narrative: "Killing Pablo: The Hunt for the World's Greatest Outlaw."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and By Jim Haner,Sun Staff | March 7, 1999
"Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War," by Mark Bowden. Atlantic Monthly Press. 386 pages. $24.The Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk is arguably the most advanced military attack helicopter ever built. Studded with rockets, cannons and a multiplicity of sighting devices, it can hover above a patch of ground and shred everything within a hundred yards of its shadow at the push of a button.The Clinton administration and congressional Republicans want to boost the Pentagon budget by more than $12 billion next year alone to buy swarms of them, and new jet fighters and submarines and other up-linked technological marvels to ensure Pax Americana into the 21st century.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | May 14, 2006
Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America's War With Militant Islam Mark Bowden Atlantic Monthly Press / 704 pages / $26 If the global struggle between tradition and modernity, tribalism and globalism, religious radicals and the world's sole superpower might be traced to a particular moment, it would be a baleful Sunday 27 years ago. On Nov. 4, 1979, hundreds of Iranian students, followers of the Shiite cleric Ayatollah Khomeini, overran and...
FEATURES
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Special to The Sun | October 25, 1994
They've broken up the old gang in Philadelphia that made the Eagles such an entertaining team a few years ago.Owner Norman Braman has sold the team, coach Buddy Ryan is in the desert in Phoenix, Jerome Brown died in an auto crash, and most of the big-name players -- including Reggie White, Keith Jackson, Seth Joyner and Clyde Simmons -- have scattered to the four winds.When they were all together in Philadelphia in the late 1980s, there was no team that created such a storm off the field but was so disappointing on it.Even though they never managed to win a playoff game, they were always a high-profile team noted for making headlines, whether it was Mr. Ryan treating the owner with disdain before he got fired or the defensive players treating the offensive players as if they were second-class citizens.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | November 10, 2012
"All In" is the title of the David Petraeus biography, and no book is more aptly titled. His caree is now in a shambles because he made a big, disasterous bet -- having an affair with co-author Paula Broadwell -- and it led to his resignation as CIA director. The affair also sullies the book by Broadwell and Washington Post editor Vernon Loeb, which was highly praised. The prurient may read it, for clues to the Petraeus/Broadwell relationship. But how can anyone else now believe it is an objective account of his personality and leadership?
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
Daniel Mark Epstein, biographer of Nat King Cole, will be one of about 60 authors appearing Sunday at Book Bash '99, an annual fund-raiser for Baltimore County literacy programs.Book Bash '99 takes place from 6 p.m. to 9: 30 p.m. at the Bibelot bookstore in Festival at Woodholme, 1819 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville. Tickets cost $40 per person in advance, $50 at the door.Diane Rehm, public radio talk-show host and author of "Finding My Voice," is honorary author chairwoman of the event. She will appear at a $150-per-person reception from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Daniel J. Kornstein and By Daniel J. Kornstein,Special to the Sun | October 13, 2002
Finders Keepers, by Mark Bowden. Atlantic Monthly Press. 208 pages. $23. What might have been a boring account of a botched crime becomes, in Mark Bowden's versatile hands, a taut, fast-paced tale with larger meaning. Finders Keepers is the true story of a pathetic loser who, more than 20 years ago, found $1.2 million that accidentally fell out of an armored car. Joey Coyle was a sad, mixed-up, self-destructive, paranoid high school dropout who at age 28 still lived in his mother's house in South Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2001
"Killing Pablo: The Hunt for the World's Greatest Outlaw," by Mark Bowden. Atlantic Monthly Press. 296 pages. $25. "Plata o plomo." Translated into English, the words mean "money or lead." But in Colombia, the words carried a pernicious message: Take a bribe or take a bullet. That was cocaine czar Pablo Escobar's strategy for running his billion-dollar-a-year trafficking empire for more than a decade. Under his "plata o plomo" doctrine, bribes abounded and bodies piled high. In the wake of movies such as the Oscar-winning "Traffic" that present troubling but fascinating vignettes about the war on drugs, comes Mark Bowden's new non-fiction narrative: "Killing Pablo: The Hunt for the World's Greatest Outlaw."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jim Haner and By Jim Haner,Sun Staff | March 7, 1999
"Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War," by Mark Bowden. Atlantic Monthly Press. 386 pages. $24.The Sikorsky UH-60 Black Hawk is arguably the most advanced military attack helicopter ever built. Studded with rockets, cannons and a multiplicity of sighting devices, it can hover above a patch of ground and shred everything within a hundred yards of its shadow at the push of a button.The Clinton administration and congressional Republicans want to boost the Pentagon budget by more than $12 billion next year alone to buy swarms of them, and new jet fighters and submarines and other up-linked technological marvels to ensure Pax Americana into the 21st century.
NEWS
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,special to the sun | June 29, 2008
In his classic book, On Writing Well, William Zinsser claimed that people and places were the twin pillars on which all good nonfiction is built. These three books - all with a local connection - prove that point. Their subjects qualify them as textbooks. Yet they are written so engagingly that any one of them could be beach reading. The secret lies in the authors' attention to detail, story line, character and setting. The Universe in a Mirror By Robert Zimmerman Princeton University Press / 287 pages / $29.95 From bureaucratic bungling, technical delays and budget deficits to heated battles among scientists, the Hubble Space Telescope has had more than its share of misfortune.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2009
SATURDAY BARRY LEVINSON, DAVID SIMON AND JOHN WATERS: Baltimore's film and TV VIPs come together for the first time for an open conversation about the film industry and filming in Maryland at Maryland Institute College of Art, 1300 Mount Royal Ave. The event, a fundraiser for the Maryland Film Festival, is moderated by film critic Elvis Mitchell. The evening starts for all-access pass holders with a cocktail reception at 5:30 p.m. followed by dinner with the filmmakers at 6:30 p.m. Doors open at 7 p.m. for conversation and auction-only ticket holders.
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