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By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | November 11, 1998
We've had ethnic cookbooks, regional cookbooks, appetizer and dessert cookbooks, and books about a particular kind of food - soup, say, or salsa. But in the past few years, there has been a mini-trend developing for compendium cookbooks.These are the encyclopedias of cooking, the ones that tell you how to prepare everything from soup to nuts, from asparagus to zabaglione. The new ones are aimed at those baby boomers and others who eschewed cooking when they were growing up, and now are scrambling to learn.
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By Erin Mendell and Erin Mendell,Sun reporter | December 12, 2007
How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food By Mark Bittman Wiley / 2007 / $35 With How to Cook Everything Vegetarian, New York Times columnist Mark Bittman follows up on his book How to Cook Everything with another user-friendly and comprehensive cookbook, this time without meat. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian offers lessons and tips that both the kitchen novice and the experienced cook can learn from. Some of Bittman's recipes, especially a pasta dish prepared like risotto, already have become favorites of mine.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 31, 2000
WHEN I COOK, I often throw things together, literally. One night, for instance, while a homemade pizza was baking in the oven, I found some Italian parsley in the bottom of the fridge and hurriedly sprinkled it atop the bubbling pizza. The late addition added a pleasing note. Often, while cooking hamburgers, I flip an onion onto the barbecue grill, using a nice soft, underhand motion like a second baseman tossing a baseball to the shortstop. Sometimes, my throws are errant. Tossing dill on a pizza, for instance, turned out to be a flavor mistake, even though it looked picturesque.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
The Best Recipes in the World Mark Bittman Broadway Books / 2005 / $29.95 For a writer who calls his New York Times column "The Minimalist," Mark Bittman is fond of superlatives. His first major cookbook announced its ambitions with the title How to Cook Everything, and lived up to them by becoming a best-seller that spawned spinoff cookbooks and a TV show. So it's not surprising that when Bittman decided to take on cooking around the globe, he called his 757-page effort The Best Recipes in the World.
NEWS
By KATE SHATZKIN and KATE SHATZKIN,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
The Best Recipes in the World Mark Bittman Broadway Books / 2005 / $29.95 For a writer who calls his New York Times column "The Minimalist," Mark Bittman is fond of superlatives. His first major cookbook announced its ambitions with the title How to Cook Everything, and lived up to them by becoming a best-seller that spawned spinoff cookbooks and a TV show. So it's not surprising that when Bittman decided to take on cooking around the globe, he called his 757-page effort The Best Recipes in the World.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 18, 2005
THE TROUBLE WITH chefs, says veteran food writer Mark Bittman, is that they tend to make cooking too complicated. In a chef's view, any dish that does not require 40 ingredients and a day of preparation is not really worthy of undertaking, he says. Bittman knows that this sweeping characterization does not apply to all chefs, all the time. But he does believe that at the heart of the grand creations of most chefs lurks a simple recipe that home cooks can handle. For example, when noted Manhattan chef Daniel Boulud prepares lamb, he cooks it four ways, saucing a stuffed saddle of lamb with preserved lemon zest, roasting a leg of lamb with beans and mushrooms, grilling marinated brochettes of lamb chops and braising a lamb shoulder.
NEWS
By Erin Mendell and Erin Mendell,Sun reporter | December 12, 2007
How to Cook Everything Vegetarian: Simple Meatless Recipes for Great Food By Mark Bittman Wiley / 2007 / $35 With How to Cook Everything Vegetarian, New York Times columnist Mark Bittman follows up on his book How to Cook Everything with another user-friendly and comprehensive cookbook, this time without meat. How to Cook Everything Vegetarian offers lessons and tips that both the kitchen novice and the experienced cook can learn from. Some of Bittman's recipes, especially a pasta dish prepared like risotto, already have become favorites of mine.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
If there's a cook on your Christmas list, take heart. The perfect gift is waiting at your nearest bookstore, thanks to a simple truth: People who cook never have enough cookbooks.But there is a trick to buying a cookbook. 1ow to choose? With new cookbooks appearing at the rate of several a day, picking just one, or one or two, can be daunting.So, to get a little guidance through the literary cornucopia, we asked more than a dozen local food enthusiasts, both in the food profession and out of it, to recommend their favorite cookbooks -- new ones, most loved ones, ones they'd give as gifts.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun reporter | August 30, 2006
As summer wanes, Asian noodles make a fine foundation for crossover meals. Served cold, they give substance to salads and agreeably partner with peanut sauce. As the weather cools, noodles heat up in stir-fries and soups. They are literally and figuratively flexible. In that spirit, don't be limited by where the noodles come from. Fresh Chinese egg noodles are a core ingredient in Malaysian and Singaporean cooking, writes James Oseland in the new cookbook Cradle of Flavor. In The Spicy Food Lover's Bible, authors Dave DeWitt and Nancy Gerlach pair Japanese udon or soba noodles with mustard greens.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 17, 2006
It may be the ugliest fish in the ocean, but, man, is it tasty. I am talking about monkfish, Lophius americanus, the bottom dweller that has an enormous head, serious teeth and a face only a mother monk- fish could love. Sitting on the bottom of the ocean, the monkfish dangles its modified spine, or "esca" in front of its mouth to attract prey. When a passing fish takes this "bait," the monkfish, also known as the anglerfish, swallows the fish. Monkfish have been reported to eat prey half their size, according to a fact sheet produced by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, and also have been known to venture up to the surface and chow down on water birds.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 18, 2005
THE TROUBLE WITH chefs, says veteran food writer Mark Bittman, is that they tend to make cooking too complicated. In a chef's view, any dish that does not require 40 ingredients and a day of preparation is not really worthy of undertaking, he says. Bittman knows that this sweeping characterization does not apply to all chefs, all the time. But he does believe that at the heart of the grand creations of most chefs lurks a simple recipe that home cooks can handle. For example, when noted Manhattan chef Daniel Boulud prepares lamb, he cooks it four ways, saucing a stuffed saddle of lamb with preserved lemon zest, roasting a leg of lamb with beans and mushrooms, grilling marinated brochettes of lamb chops and braising a lamb shoulder.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 31, 2000
WHEN I COOK, I often throw things together, literally. One night, for instance, while a homemade pizza was baking in the oven, I found some Italian parsley in the bottom of the fridge and hurriedly sprinkled it atop the bubbling pizza. The late addition added a pleasing note. Often, while cooking hamburgers, I flip an onion onto the barbecue grill, using a nice soft, underhand motion like a second baseman tossing a baseball to the shortstop. Sometimes, my throws are errant. Tossing dill on a pizza, for instance, turned out to be a flavor mistake, even though it looked picturesque.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | November 11, 1998
We've had ethnic cookbooks, regional cookbooks, appetizer and dessert cookbooks, and books about a particular kind of food - soup, say, or salsa. But in the past few years, there has been a mini-trend developing for compendium cookbooks.These are the encyclopedias of cooking, the ones that tell you how to prepare everything from soup to nuts, from asparagus to zabaglione. The new ones are aimed at those baby boomers and others who eschewed cooking when they were growing up, and now are scrambling to learn.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
If there's a cook on your Christmas list, take heart. The perfect gift is waiting at your nearest bookstore, thanks to a simple truth: People who cook never have enough cookbooks.But there is a trick to buying a cookbook. 1ow to choose? With new cookbooks appearing at the rate of several a day, picking just one, or one or two, can be daunting.So, to get a little guidance through the literary cornucopia, we asked more than a dozen local food enthusiasts, both in the food profession and out of it, to recommend their favorite cookbooks -- new ones, most loved ones, ones they'd give as gifts.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 17, 2002
AS HAPPENS when you have a lot of spare time on your hands, I performed an aberrant act last weekend. I boiled some spare ribs. There were not very many ribs - just three pairs cut in 3--inch lengths. And there was not much water involved - about half a cup. Nonetheless, the very act of putting pork ribs in water seemed like anathema to me. It has been an article of faith that pork ribs should be cooked on the barbecue grill, or in a smoker, over a low, slow fire. The other day as I stood at the stove and watched the water bubble around the meat, I could hear the admonitions ringing in my ears from Rick Catalano, proprietor of Cafe Tattoo on Belair Road in Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 25, 2006
Stick with the old reliable, or try something new. That is a choice we face on a lot of fronts, including which soup to fix for supper. Recently when I was supposed to decide between the old or new, I ended up going for both. I made two potato soups, a vintage version laced with sour cream and a newcomer laden with caraway seeds and cabbage. On winter weeknights, my energy level seems to mimic a backyard thermometer - dropping lower by the minute. By sunset, my brain is as dim as the winter sky. I crave something simple, comforting, warm and substantial.
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