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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
After Navy SEAL snipers killed three Somali pirates during the dramatic rescue of Capt. Richard Phillips off the Horn of Africa in 2009, the merchant mariner became an overnight star, lauded as a hero for sacrificing himself to save his cargo ship's crew. Now, officials with the Baltimore-based International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots — the union that represents licensed merchant mariners — hope Phillips' story, and the Oct. 11 release of a big-budget film based on his high-seas ordeal, will help them raise awareness about their work in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
After Navy SEAL snipers killed three Somali pirates during the dramatic rescue of Capt. Richard Phillips off the Horn of Africa in 2009, the merchant mariner became an overnight star, lauded as a hero for sacrificing himself to save his cargo ship's crew. Now, officials with the Baltimore-based International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots — the union that represents licensed merchant mariners — hope Phillips' story, and the Oct. 11 release of a big-budget film based on his high-seas ordeal, will help them raise awareness about their work in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1997
His daughter tearfully pleaded for mercy. So did his brother.Then, with his family members sobbing in the gallery of a federal courtroom in Baltimore yesterday, Harry Seidman took the stand to say he was innocent of embezzling more than $900,000 from an international maritime union in Maryland and didn't deserve a tough prison term."
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
Hold No. 3, deep within the dark steel hull of the British ship Global Mariner, once carried pallets of cargo around the world.Today, it's the "disaster room."The aft bulkhead is covered with a giant color photograph of men injured at sea -- a body crushed by a piston, a hand severed by a slammed hatch cover. To starboard is the scorched hull of the hijacked passenger ferry Achille Lauro. Toward the bow: the bulk carrier Flare, which broke in half off the coast of Newfoundland in January.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1996
At the maritime union's headquarters on the outskirts of Baltimore, not much was sacred.Prosecutors said in court yesterday that double-billing was rampant. So were kickbacks, gifts, trips, even visits to massage parlors. And when the union wanted to publish copies of its constitution for its 7,000 members, a kickback allegedly was part of the plan.The claims came during opening statements in the federal corruption trial of Harry Seidman, 64, former comptroller of the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, a union that represents ship captains and deck officers in seaports in the United States and abroad.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
The star witness in the maritime union corruption case against Harry Seidman is heading to federal prison -- despite helping prosecutors and investigators crack an elaborate kickback scheme that cost union members more than $800,000.Ronald Schoop, 60, was ordered to serve eight months behind bars yesterday for his role in the scheme, which siphoned the money from the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots in Linthicum Heights for nearly 15 years.Sending a signalU.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg said he wanted the sentence to send a signal that white-collar corruption is a serious crime, and Schoop and Seidman betrayed the trust of of the 7,000-member union that represents ship captains and deck officers around the world.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | January 26, 1992
Mattresses are propped along the walls of the union hall in Little Italy, the bedding piled on chairs, as anxious union members sit inside in a round-the-clock state of siege.Since the shipboard engineers broke away from their parent union Jan. 16 in a fight centered on control of the $1.2 billion pension fund, they have expected the national union squad to arrive and seize possession of the hall and pension office.The parent union has "taken over the halls in Norfolk and Portland," reports Gordon M. Ward, as he listens over the phone to the news of the occupation of division offices in the Virginia and Oregon ports.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | January 26, 1992
Mattresses are propped along the walls of the union hall in Little Italy, the bedding piled on chairs, as anxious union members sit inside in a round-the-clock state of siege.Since the shipboard engineers broke away from their parent union Jan. 16 in a fight centered on control of the $1.2 billion pension fund, they have expected the national union squad to arrive and seize possession of the hall and pension office."The scumbags have taken over the halls in Norfolk and Portland," reports Gordon M. Ward, as he listens to the news over the phone of the occupation of division offices in the Virginia and Oregon ports.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns Lyle Denniston of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | February 21, 1991
Challenger Timothy A. Brown captured the presidency of a Baltimore-based national maritime officers union yesterday, ousting a 12-year incumbent in a rerun election ordered by the federal courts because of election fraud and ballot forgery in 1988.Mr. Brown, 48, of Tampa, Fla., was elected president of the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots by a vote of 2,489 to 2,079 over Robert T. Lowen in balloting supervised by the U.S. Department of Labor.His running mate, James T. Hopkins Jr., defeated incumbent secretary-treasurer F. Elwood Kyser, 2,426 to 2,106.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1997
The International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots has obtained a $1.7 million insurance settlement connected to a multimillion-dollar embezzlement scheme by one of its officials.The settlement, made with National Union Fire Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh, means that the Linthicum Heights-based union has recovered $2.8 million of the $3.6 million it says was stolen over 15 years."This settlement brings closure to a sad and painful chapter in the otherwise proud history of the MM&P," said Timothy Brown, the union's president.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1997
The International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots has obtained a $1.7 million insurance settlement connected to a multimillion-dollar embezzlement scheme by one of its officials.The settlement, made with National Union Fire Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh, means that the Linthicum Heights-based union has recovered $2.8 million of the $3.6 million it says was stolen over 15 years."This settlement brings closure to a sad and painful chapter in the otherwise proud history of the MM&P," said Timothy Brown, the union's president.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | January 11, 1997
His daughter tearfully pleaded for mercy. So did his brother.Then, with his family members sobbing in the gallery of a federal courtroom in Baltimore yesterday, Harry Seidman took the stand to say he was innocent of embezzling more than $900,000 from an international maritime union in Maryland and didn't deserve a tough prison term."
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
The star witness in the maritime union corruption case against Harry Seidman is heading to federal prison -- despite helping prosecutors and investigators crack an elaborate kickback scheme that cost union members more than $800,000.Ronald Schoop, 60, was ordered to serve eight months behind bars yesterday for his role in the scheme, which siphoned the money from the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots in Linthicum Heights for nearly 15 years.Sending a signalU.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg said he wanted the sentence to send a signal that white-collar corruption is a serious crime, and Schoop and Seidman betrayed the trust of of the 7,000-member union that represents ship captains and deck officers around the world.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | September 10, 1996
At the maritime union's headquarters on the outskirts of Baltimore, not much was sacred.Prosecutors said in court yesterday that double-billing was rampant. So were kickbacks, gifts, trips, even visits to massage parlors. And when the union wanted to publish copies of its constitution for its 7,000 members, a kickback allegedly was part of the plan.The claims came during opening statements in the federal corruption trial of Harry Seidman, 64, former comptroller of the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots, a union that represents ship captains and deck officers in seaports in the United States and abroad.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | January 26, 1992
Mattresses are propped along the walls of the union hall in Little Italy, the bedding piled on chairs, as anxious union members sit inside in a round-the-clock state of siege.Since the shipboard engineers broke away from their parent union Jan. 16 in a fight centered on control of the $1.2 billion pension fund, they have expected the national union squad to arrive and seize possession of the hall and pension office."The scumbags have taken over the halls in Norfolk and Portland," reports Gordon M. Ward, as he listens to the news over the phone of the occupation of division offices in the Virginia and Oregon ports.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns | January 26, 1992
Mattresses are propped along the walls of the union hall in Little Italy, the bedding piled on chairs, as anxious union members sit inside in a round-the-clock state of siege.Since the shipboard engineers broke away from their parent union Jan. 16 in a fight centered on control of the $1.2 billion pension fund, they have expected the national union squad to arrive and seize possession of the hall and pension office.The parent union has "taken over the halls in Norfolk and Portland," reports Gordon M. Ward, as he listens over the phone to the news of the occupation of division offices in the Virginia and Oregon ports.
NEWS
By Susan Hansen and Susan Hansen,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 25, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore-area union dissidents -- warning that a $1 billion pension fund may be in jeopardy -- are leading a rank-and file revolt against leaders of one of the nation's largest maritime unions.The dissidents charge that District One Marine Engineers BeneficialAssociation officials pilfered millions from union coffers after the union's 1988 merger with the National Maritime Union. And they allege that union officials in Washington are plotting a sellout of the Baltimore-based pension fund.
NEWS
By Susan Hansen and Susan Hansen,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Dissident members of a leading maritime industry union have scored a major electoral upset, seizing key leadership posts in a victory they said will help restore union democracy and protect a $1 billion Baltimore-based pension fund.Dissident candidates ousted more than a dozen top officials of the District 1 Marine Engineers Beneficial Association/National Maritime Union."People wanted a change," said Gordon Ward, a Timonium resident who will take over as chairman of the union's licensed division, which represents about 4,800 marine engineers and ships' officers nationwide.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | September 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The heads of three major maritime unions have called on all segments of the maritime industry to work collectively to create a national program to save U.S.-flag shipping.Industry observers hailed the unprecedented joint statement Monday by the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots, the Seafarers International Union and a division of the National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association, as a potentially important step toward demonstrating the industry unity needed to prod Congress to enact new programs to revitalize U.S.-flag shipping.
NEWS
By Michael K. Burns Lyle Denniston of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | February 21, 1991
Challenger Timothy A. Brown captured the presidency of a Baltimore-based national maritime officers union yesterday, ousting a 12-year incumbent in a rerun election ordered by the federal courts because of election fraud and ballot forgery in 1988.Mr. Brown, 48, of Tampa, Fla., was elected president of the International Organization of Masters, Mates and Pilots by a vote of 2,489 to 2,079 over Robert T. Lowen in balloting supervised by the U.S. Department of Labor.His running mate, James T. Hopkins Jr., defeated incumbent secretary-treasurer F. Elwood Kyser, 2,426 to 2,106.
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