Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMaritime Republic
IN THE NEWS

Maritime Republic

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
For 15 years, the Slaughter Across the Water cast shame on Annapolis. The city regularly lost the annual tug-of-war match over the harbor to its Eastport rivals. The Annapolis team has had to recruit last-minute tuggers from bar stools and bathrooms. Worse, apathy has forced the team to rely on volunteers from the opposing Maritime Republic of Eastport, the same rascals who have stolen the flag from City Hall and "kidnapped" its mayor. "From what I heard, they had to bribe people with beer to come to the Annapolis side last year," said Marie Dall'Acqua, an organizer with the city's Take-Back-The-Tug campaign.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
On the job a little more than a week, Alicia Estrada hasn't settled into her new digs at the Annapolis Maritime Museum. But she has begun evaluating its programs as she looks to the future of the former oyster plant. "I'm just trying to get my head around everything," said Estrada, the museum's new executive director. She'll get the official schoolchildren's tour of the waterfront museum in coming days, she said. The museum tells the story of the Chesapeake Bay through exhibits, lectures and entertainment — and, in the process, teaches about the maritime heritage of the Annapolis area.
Advertisement
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | October 26, 2005
The Minister of Propaganda has churned out six news releases ("Would you like me to send you all of them?" she asks). The Minister of War is rattling the saber ("Our troops go to the gym every other day!" he said.) The Premier is making wild threats ("We will annex parts of the city!" she said.) It is that time of year again, and the breakaway "Maritime Republic of Eastport" is preparing for war. The annual tug of war. Ever since the Spa Creek Bridge closed temporarily for repairs in 1998, effectively cutting off the Eastport community from the rest of Annapolis and prompting a mock secession, the two "sides" have had an annual battle for superiority, bragging rights, or charity, depending on who you talk to. This year's tug of war starts at 10:30 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2012
It came down to the final round of the world's longest tug-of-war over water, but the city of Annapolis delivered Saturday on its vow to save face against rival Eastport and win the annual match billed as the "Slaughter Across the Water. " As supporters screamed, "Tug! Tug! Tug!" 33 men and women strained to pull a thick rope and hold their ground as if their lives - not just bragging rights - depended on it. From the Annapolis side of Spa Creek, they faced off against the Eastport team, barely visible more than 1,600 feet away on the opposite shore.
NEWS
By Keisha Stewart and Keisha Stewart,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 1998
The Maritime Republic of Eastport "rejoined" Annapolis on Friday, ending its unofficial secession from the city with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on the bridge that links the communities.The revolt lasted the three weeks it took the State Highway Administration to repair the Spa Creek Bridge.Leon Wolfe, "prime minister" of the Maritime Republic of Eastport, marched up his side of the bridge at noon wearing a Napoleonesque admiral's jacket with medals.He was accompanied by a delegation of Eastport dignitaries.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2000
FOLKS IN the volunteer crowd know fresh blood when they see it. When Laura Townsend inquired several months ago about, you know, maybe helping out a little bit, the honchos of the Maritime Republic of Eastport wasted little time bringing her on board. In fact, they installed her as "deputy minister of propaganda" and declared her the chairwoman for MRE's "Independence Weekend," taking place Friday and Saturday. The Maritime Republic of Eastport was founded in 1997 as a means to boost commerce for Eastport businesses affected by an impending repair-work closure of the Spa Creek Bridge connecting the Eastport peninsula with downtown Annapolis.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 1999
WHEN ARTIST Cindy Fletcher-Holden goes to her regular job, she brings paint by the thimbleful. "I measure it in tablespoons," she explained.Working sometimes upside-down over a transom, she paints names on boats. Lots of boats, maybe 300 a season.She has switched gears, though, and just started her most prodigious job, not with tablespoons, but with 50 gallons of paint, creating a maritime mural on a blank, 17-by-90-foot wall.It's going up on the Hopkins Furniture warehouse at Fourth and Chesapeake, a site that's been called an eyesore for years.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,sun reporter | November 11, 2007
Joe Mack didn't train a lick and hadn't participated in a tug of war since eighth grade, so he and his teammates were elated to pull off a fleeting victory for Annapolis yesterday in its annual battle against the enclave dubbed the Maritime Republic of Eastport. But, as it does more often than not, Eastport outpulled its parent city overall - winning three of the five heats and bragging rights in a town where boastfulness is practically the municipal pastime. The city of legislators and lobbyists, where serious Middle East peace talks are planned, showed its lighter side during the 10th anniversary tug organized by the group from Eastport, a breakaway neighborhood that unofficially seceded from Annapolis on Super Bowl Sunday 1998 using a strategy mapped out on bar napkins.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2012
It came down to the final round of the world's longest tug-of-war over water, but the city of Annapolis delivered Saturday on its vow to save face against rival Eastport and win the annual match billed as the "Slaughter Across the Water. " As supporters screamed, "Tug! Tug! Tug!" 33 men and women strained to pull a thick rope and hold their ground as if their lives - not just bragging rights - depended on it. From the Annapolis side of Spa Creek, they faced off against the Eastport team, barely visible more than 1,600 feet away on the opposite shore.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
On the job a little more than a week, Alicia Estrada hasn't settled into her new digs at the Annapolis Maritime Museum. But she has begun evaluating its programs as she looks to the future of the former oyster plant. "I'm just trying to get my head around everything," said Estrada, the museum's new executive director. She'll get the official schoolchildren's tour of the waterfront museum in coming days, she said. The museum tells the story of the Chesapeake Bay through exhibits, lectures and entertainment — and, in the process, teaches about the maritime heritage of the Annapolis area.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
For 15 years, the Slaughter Across the Water cast shame on Annapolis. The city regularly lost the annual tug-of-war match over the harbor to its Eastport rivals. The Annapolis team has had to recruit last-minute tuggers from bar stools and bathrooms. Worse, apathy has forced the team to rely on volunteers from the opposing Maritime Republic of Eastport, the same rascals who have stolen the flag from City Hall and "kidnapped" its mayor. "From what I heard, they had to bribe people with beer to come to the Annapolis side last year," said Marie Dall'Acqua, an organizer with the city's Take-Back-The-Tug campaign.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,sun reporter | November 11, 2007
Joe Mack didn't train a lick and hadn't participated in a tug of war since eighth grade, so he and his teammates were elated to pull off a fleeting victory for Annapolis yesterday in its annual battle against the enclave dubbed the Maritime Republic of Eastport. But, as it does more often than not, Eastport outpulled its parent city overall - winning three of the five heats and bragging rights in a town where boastfulness is practically the municipal pastime. The city of legislators and lobbyists, where serious Middle East peace talks are planned, showed its lighter side during the 10th anniversary tug organized by the group from Eastport, a breakaway neighborhood that unofficially seceded from Annapolis on Super Bowl Sunday 1998 using a strategy mapped out on bar napkins.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY | October 26, 2005
The Minister of Propaganda has churned out six news releases ("Would you like me to send you all of them?" she asks). The Minister of War is rattling the saber ("Our troops go to the gym every other day!" he said.) The Premier is making wild threats ("We will annex parts of the city!" she said.) It is that time of year again, and the breakaway "Maritime Republic of Eastport" is preparing for war. The annual tug of war. Ever since the Spa Creek Bridge closed temporarily for repairs in 1998, effectively cutting off the Eastport community from the rest of Annapolis and prompting a mock secession, the two "sides" have had an annual battle for superiority, bragging rights, or charity, depending on who you talk to. This year's tug of war starts at 10:30 a.m. Saturday.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 2000
FOLKS IN the volunteer crowd know fresh blood when they see it. When Laura Townsend inquired several months ago about, you know, maybe helping out a little bit, the honchos of the Maritime Republic of Eastport wasted little time bringing her on board. In fact, they installed her as "deputy minister of propaganda" and declared her the chairwoman for MRE's "Independence Weekend," taking place Friday and Saturday. The Maritime Republic of Eastport was founded in 1997 as a means to boost commerce for Eastport businesses affected by an impending repair-work closure of the Spa Creek Bridge connecting the Eastport peninsula with downtown Annapolis.
NEWS
By Douglas Lamborne and Douglas Lamborne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 1999
WHEN ARTIST Cindy Fletcher-Holden goes to her regular job, she brings paint by the thimbleful. "I measure it in tablespoons," she explained.Working sometimes upside-down over a transom, she paints names on boats. Lots of boats, maybe 300 a season.She has switched gears, though, and just started her most prodigious job, not with tablespoons, but with 50 gallons of paint, creating a maritime mural on a blank, 17-by-90-foot wall.It's going up on the Hopkins Furniture warehouse at Fourth and Chesapeake, a site that's been called an eyesore for years.
NEWS
By Keisha Stewart and Keisha Stewart,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 1998
The Maritime Republic of Eastport "rejoined" Annapolis on Friday, ending its unofficial secession from the city with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on the bridge that links the communities.The revolt lasted the three weeks it took the State Highway Administration to repair the Spa Creek Bridge.Leon Wolfe, "prime minister" of the Maritime Republic of Eastport, marched up his side of the bridge at noon wearing a Napoleonesque admiral's jacket with medals.He was accompanied by a delegation of Eastport dignitaries.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
On the edge of the city dock in downtown Annapolis yesterday, while pausing momentarily from a walk near the water, Annapolis resident Eilis Cancel shaded her eyes to read the banner of a plane flying overhead."
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY NANINE HARTZENBUSCH and PHOTOS BY NANINE HARTZENBUSCH,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | November 2, 2005
The Maritime Republic of Eastport took on its oppressor, Annapolis, during the eighth annual "Slaughter Across the Water" tug of war Saturday, using a 1,824-foot rope over Spa Creek. The members of the would-be nation (residents of Annapolis' Eastport area) were no match for the other residents of the capital, losing 0-5.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1998
On the edge of the city dock in downtown Annapolis yesterday, while pausing momentarily from a walk near the water, Annapolis resident Eilis Cancel shaded her eyes to read the banner of a plane flying overhead."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.