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NEWS
August 29, 1993
A decade-long decline of the U.S. maritime industry may have been accelerated this summer by the decision of the Clinton administration to renege on a promised reform package and instead drop all subsidies to U.S. ships in 1997. That places this country's small ocean-going fleet and its 27,000 jobs in jeopardy.Compounding the danger is an administration study that would go even further by totally deregulating the maritime industry. That could sound the death knell for Bethlehem Steel's struggling Sparrows Point shipyard and for any semblance of a home-based maritime industry.
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NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | March 20, 2014
I just wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed your column about the local history of the Joppa Town area last week. I especially hadn't known the part about the once flourishing port that had to be abandoned along with others along the northern bay and Bush River. Having grown up in Catonsville myself, I was also familiar with your comparing the modern version (1960s onward) with Columbia in Howard County, which was planned and built at about the same time. One more interesting personal thing was that I began my professional teaching career at Havre de Grace High School in 1973.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | August 11, 1993
The nation's maritime industry faces no less a crisis than its airlines, say five Democratic senators who want a new business and government panel to investigate reviving the industry.The senators said yesterday that they had introduced legislation to create the panel, which would be appointed by President Clinton. That move was prompted by recent applications of the two largest U.S. shippers' to reflag much of their fleet in foreign countries. Sea-Land Service Inc. and American President Companies hope to avoid tough U.S. regulations, taxes and high labor costs.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
The company that runs the annual boat shows in Annapolis was officially sold Monday afternoon, as has been planned for months. Longtime owner Ed Hartman, who clashed with former Mayor Josh Cohen, sold the business to a group of investors that includes show manager Paul Jacobs and others in the local maritime industry. The show management team will carry over to the new ownershop of the company, United States Yacht Shows Inc. The company will sponsor four shows in 2014: the Bay Bridge Boat Show in Stevensville in April, the Annapolis Spring Sailboat Show in April, and the United States Sailboat Show and United States Powerboat Show in Annapolis in Octover.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
Amid the sailors decked out in foul-weather gear, the hundreds of gleaming sloops and catamarans and row after row of maritime accessories at this weekend's U.S. Sailboat Show, Bob Maersch is peddling a simple service. For $100, he can take a faded, scraped-up winch and turn it into a gleaming piece of nautical hardware. He'll do the same for your turnbuckles, your chocks, your cleats and any other sailboat equipment or metallic keepsake. A former electrical engineer, Maersch and his wife, Rita, both 61, bought Annapolis Plating and Polishing on Hudson Street in Annapolis four years ago, becoming part of the diverse and thriving maritime industry in the state capital.
NEWS
July 7, 1996
TAY YOSHITANI has big plans for the Port of Baltimore. That's good news for the local maritime industry that has been in the dumps in recent decades. The director of the Maryland Port Administration uses two apparently contradictory terms to describe his vision: diversification and focus. Baltimore has to diversify its cargo mix, he says, by focusing firmly on niches where this port has distinct advantages. He has come up with a strategic five-year plan -- a first for the port -- with specific targeted growth areas.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1996
Maersk Inc., one of the largest steamship carriers at the Port of Baltimore, is suspending its weekly South American service here, underscoring long-held fears that the Danish giant intends soon to scrap the remainder of its service in Maryland as well.The company said yesterday that the decision to shift its South American service to Norfolk, Va., is part of its continuing assessment about how to deploy the 175-ship fleet resulting from Maersk's recent alliance with Sea-Land Service Inc."
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1998
In a move designed to boost the state's maritime industry, the Maryland House of Delegates voted yesterday to give boat buyers a tax break when they trade in old boats for more expensive models.Supporters said the measure would make Maryland more competitive with other states in the region and would help the industry recover from a sales slump."It's the best news we've had in at least 20 years," said Beth Kahr, executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland. "We've finally got a chance to gain parity with our competitors in other states.
NEWS
By Sharahn D. Boykin and Sharahn D. Boykin,Sun reporter | August 8, 2007
Marina owners, charter boat captains and others in Anne Arundel County's thriving maritime industry will soon have a unified voice to represent their interests on local policies. The County Council unanimously approved Monday night the creation of a 16-member Martime Industry Advisory Board that will guide county officials on such matters as ethanol fuel, maritime zoning and utilities at marinas. "I think it creates a unique and beneficial opportunity for the maritime industry," said Bob Burdon, president and chief executive officer of the Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
August 3, 2003
Crime statistics in story refuted In the interview with Anne Arundel County Police Chief P. Thomas Shanahan on public safety in the county, there are two serious misstatements of fact ("Police, fire chiefs say public is safe despite staff cuts," July 24). The statement that violent crime "has been steadily declining" since 2000 is wrong. According to the county police annual reports, as well as data submitted by the police to the FBI under the Uniform Crime Reporting System, violent crime in Anne Arundel County went up more than 15 percent in 2001, and experienced only a marginal (1.2 percent)
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2013
Former Maryland Rep. Helen Delich Bentley has been through many receiving lines in her decades as a journalist, legislator and consultant. There have been campaigns for office and campaigns for causes. But this round of handshaking, hugging and thanks was for the sheer joy of it. Bentley turns 90 years old on Nov. 28, and 500 people went to the Museum of Industry Sunday to toast her and roast her, if they dared. "This is a room full of people who both love her and fear her, and not in that order," said former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. before telling stories of her effect on his public career and private life.
NEWS
July 21, 2013
I am disappointed that Mayor Josh Cohen has chosen the ploy of character assassination to obscure his own obtuse actions in promoting a zoning change to curry favor with a developer ("City Dock plans restore the luster of Annapolis' crown jewel," July 19). In 1969 the citizens of this city voted by a margin of 2-1 to support the "no" club. The same groups as are now involved in the fight against this zoning change - Historic Annapolis, maritime and business interests - proposed historic preservation and a strengthened maritime presence rather than the high rises ringing the waterfront supported by commercial interests.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
A dispute over zoning at the Annapolis City Dock may lead to unintended consequences detrimental to the long-term vitality of our community. In her column on July 12 ("Annapolis whiffs on City Dock again"), Susan Reimer called the Save Annapolis Coalition members some "fusty historic types," and although we are determined to maintain the architectural character and charm of our 300-year - old working maritime port, it's the future that we are focused on. The height and bulk of buildings in downtown Annapolis have been limited since 1967 to preserve an 18th century architectural scale, which is sometimes called a "human scale" and is what makes the city special; Annapolis is considered beautiful by its visitors and twice has been named one of America's most beautiful small towns by Forbes Magazine.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Although it leads the East Coast in several categories of shipping activity, the port of Baltimore often seems to be hiding in plain sight. So officials used the Saturday observance of National Maritime Day to throw open a pier at the Canton Marine Terminal and invite 28 businesses and agencies that call the port home to hold a career day. "It's the first time we've done this," said former Rep. Helen Delich Bentley, for whom the port is named....
NEWS
June 19, 2012
For the first time in a very long time, it felt good to come downtown to work and see Baltimore alive again. With Sailabration going on, it brought back fond memories of how great Baltimore was at one time, but as I leave and go home and make my way down Monroe Street, the scenery is a stark reminder that Baltimore is still on life support. But for now I rather enjoyed seeing ships moored at the docks even though they are not off-loading commerce. It still is a great feeling. Growing up in Baltimore and working here pretty much my whole adult life, it brought back a time when the bows of ships would overhang Key Highway and where the Sparrows Point shipyard built around the clock and Baltimore was a 24-hour city.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2012
On a warm, sunny afternoon at the Maritime Industries Academy baseball field, posters honoring members of the Negro leagues hung on the outfield fence and dust swirled under the banner honoring Jackie Robinson at home plate. Members of the Maritime and Southside Academies wore gray and blue pin-striped replica uniform shirts of two teams that played in the NL — the Baltimore Black Sox (Maritime) and the Baltimore Elite Giants (Southside). And they played with wooden bats. In this, the 1st Annual Negro League Appreciation Game, the Maritime Black Sox won, 11-1, in five innings, with pitcher Devont'e Lewis striking out 14 and allowing just one hit while going the distance.
NEWS
March 19, 2001
USi volunteers donate 1,830 books to elementary schools Volunteers from USiConnects, an employee charity of Annapolis-based USinternetworking, donated 1,830 books to seven Annapolis elementary schools as part of their participation in the recent Read Across America Day national literacy campaign. More than 30 volunteers from the group took part in the March 2 Read Across America event, which involved reading aloud to children in schools. Officials from USinternetworking expect that volunteers will log more than 500 hours reading in area elementary schools through the end of this school year.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
For the second consecutive fall, Anne Arundel Community College is offering a course that gives students at two neighboring high schools a behind-the-scenes look at the transportation industry, possibly preparing them for a future at the port of Baltimore or BWI Thurgood Marshall Airport. "Introduction to Transportation and Logistics" (BPA 235), one of six courses in the school's credit certificate program, is being offered to students at Meade High School in Fort Meade and North County High School in Glen Burnie.
NEWS
June 2, 2010
I write to convey Ports America Chesapeake's steadfast objection to the Baltimore City Council's request to increase the fees charged for oversize and overweight trucks associated with freight travel to and from the Port of Baltimore. Ports America and its predecessor companies have operated in Baltimore for 89 years. We are committed to making investments that will strengthen the Port of Baltimore for the future. Ports America objects to the proposed fee increase because it puts the Port of Baltimore at a competitive disadvantage, and it will negatively impact the master lease and concession agreement between Ports America and the Maryland Port Administration.
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