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By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 21, 2009
Starring Mickey Rourke, Marisa Tomei. Directed by Darren Aronofsky. Released by Fox Searchlight; $29.95, Blu-ray, $39.95. **** (4 STARS) Getting a broken-down actor, savaged by time and broken almost beyond repair by his own miscalculations, to play a broken-down wrestler, savaged by time and broken almost beyond repair by his own miscalculations, was only part of the genius behind The Wrestler. The rest was not letting that be the only reason to recommend the movie. Make no mistake: Getting Mickey Rourke, his body and reputation ravaged by years of physical and emotional self-abuse, to play Randy "The Ram" Robinson, was an incredible gamble (financing was tough to come by, given Rourke's track record)
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NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | April 21, 2009
Starring Mickey Rourke, Marisa Tomei. Directed by Darren Aronofsky. Released by Fox Searchlight; $29.95, Blu-ray, $39.95. **** (4 STARS) Getting a broken-down actor, savaged by time and broken almost beyond repair by his own miscalculations, to play a broken-down wrestler, savaged by time and broken almost beyond repair by his own miscalculations, was only part of the genius behind The Wrestler. The rest was not letting that be the only reason to recommend the movie. Make no mistake: Getting Mickey Rourke, his body and reputation ravaged by years of physical and emotional self-abuse, to play Randy "The Ram" Robinson, was an incredible gamble (financing was tough to come by, given Rourke's track record)
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 30, 2001
"Someone Like You" is a relationship comedy in which the only real relationship is the film's desperate courtship of the female audience. Based on Laura Zigman's novel "Animal Husbandry," this chick flick never should have made it out of the incubator. Zigman's book was joke-laden fiction in the Carrie Fisher tradition and centered on the hyperbolic theory that men, like male cows, are drawn only to females who are new to them. This "New Cow" theory could have been the basis of a slick adult cartoon or a "Sex in the City" episode.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 28, 2001
In 1992, Marisa Tomei was the surprise winner of a best supporting actress Oscar for the comedy My Cousin Vinny, beating out respected British actresses Joan Plowright, Judy Davis, Vanessa Redgrave and Miranda Richardson. In some ways, she's been paying for that win ever since. Maybe her performance in In the Bedroom, as the woman whose love of a much younger man unwittingly leads to tragedy, will finally pay that debt in full. Almost from the day she won her Oscar, the Hollywood rumor mill couldn't simply acknowledge that Tomei had given an assured, terrifically funny performance as the gum-chewing, wisecracking girlfriend of neophyte lawyer Joe Pesci.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 19, 1993
MEDITERRANEO(Touchstone, rated R, 1991)Wisely, the producers put the dedication at the end of the film because viewers wouldn't understand the reference for the first 75 minutes of this 100-minute movie. Until then, this Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film doesn't seem to have much point.It's a simple story of a band of misfit Italian sailors who are assigned to invade a remote enemy Greek island during World War II. They quickly become stranded and break their radio to cut themselves off from their commanders and the rest of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
Meg Ryan seems to play the same role in almost all her movies, the girl-next-door who finds unexpected love, but her fans don't seem to mind if the chemistry works. And it works, really works, in the charming romantic comedy "French Kiss."Breezier than "When Harry Met Sally . . . " and a lot sassier than the saccharine "Sleepless in Seattle," prime examples of the Meg Ryan subgenre, "French Kiss" sustains a light touch and still manages to be touching.Aglow with energy, Ryan gives her character both innocence and brains.
NEWS
By Lou Cedrone | March 29, 1993
THE nominations for this year's Academy Awards prove once again that the 4,000 or so members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have a rather low appreciation for the home-grown product, the big-budget, Hollywood-produced film. And once more, they seem to favor non-American actors and directors.Two of the films nominated for best movie of the year were inexpensive features made in England, and one of the men nominated for best director is Irish. One of the women nominated for best actress is English; another is French.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 28, 2001
In 1992, Marisa Tomei was the surprise winner of a best supporting actress Oscar for the comedy My Cousin Vinny, beating out respected British actresses Joan Plowright, Judy Davis, Vanessa Redgrave and Miranda Richardson. In some ways, she's been paying for that win ever since. Maybe her performance in In the Bedroom, as the woman whose love of a much younger man unwittingly leads to tragedy, will finally pay that debt in full. Almost from the day she won her Oscar, the Hollywood rumor mill couldn't simply acknowledge that Tomei had given an assured, terrifically funny performance as the gum-chewing, wisecracking girlfriend of neophyte lawyer Joe Pesci.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 27, 1994
I am not sure why I came out of "The Paper" feeling so depressed.Maybe because I thought it would be about newspapers and it's not.Or maybe because I compare all such movies with "Deadline U.S.A.," a moving and exciting picture made in 1951 that really is about newspapers and the role journalism can play in society."The Paper" is not about journalism or society. It is not about any concept. It is about personalities:It is about the madcap-with-a-heart-of-gold metro editor of a New York tabloid played by Michael Keaton and his gruff-with-heart-of-gold editor, Robert Duvall, and his bitchy-with-a-heart-of-gold managing editor, Glenn Close.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 2, 2007
What's heartening about movies like Stephen Frears' The Queen and Martin Scorsese's The Departed is their bench strength. Helen Mirren and Michael Sheen were wonderful in The Queen, but so were their court and cabinet. An array of crack character actors supports the top names in The Departed. So it's infuriating to see directors Joel Schumacher of The Number 23 and Walt Becker of Wild Hogs trash their casts. In The Number 23, Mark Pellegrino (of Capote) and Ed Lauter (who's been doing super work since The Last American Hero in 1973)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 30, 2001
"Someone Like You" is a relationship comedy in which the only real relationship is the film's desperate courtship of the female audience. Based on Laura Zigman's novel "Animal Husbandry," this chick flick never should have made it out of the incubator. Zigman's book was joke-laden fiction in the Carrie Fisher tradition and centered on the hyperbolic theory that men, like male cows, are drawn only to females who are new to them. This "New Cow" theory could have been the basis of a slick adult cartoon or a "Sex in the City" episode.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
Meg Ryan seems to play the same role in almost all her movies, the girl-next-door who finds unexpected love, but her fans don't seem to mind if the chemistry works. And it works, really works, in the charming romantic comedy "French Kiss."Breezier than "When Harry Met Sally . . . " and a lot sassier than the saccharine "Sleepless in Seattle," prime examples of the Meg Ryan subgenre, "French Kiss" sustains a light touch and still manages to be touching.Aglow with energy, Ryan gives her character both innocence and brains.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | March 27, 1994
I am not sure why I came out of "The Paper" feeling so depressed.Maybe because I thought it would be about newspapers and it's not.Or maybe because I compare all such movies with "Deadline U.S.A.," a moving and exciting picture made in 1951 that really is about newspapers and the role journalism can play in society."The Paper" is not about journalism or society. It is not about any concept. It is about personalities:It is about the madcap-with-a-heart-of-gold metro editor of a New York tabloid played by Michael Keaton and his gruff-with-heart-of-gold editor, Robert Duvall, and his bitchy-with-a-heart-of-gold managing editor, Glenn Close.
NEWS
By Lou Cedrone | March 29, 1993
THE nominations for this year's Academy Awards prove once again that the 4,000 or so members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have a rather low appreciation for the home-grown product, the big-budget, Hollywood-produced film. And once more, they seem to favor non-American actors and directors.Two of the films nominated for best movie of the year were inexpensive features made in England, and one of the men nominated for best director is Irish. One of the women nominated for best actress is English; another is French.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 19, 1993
MEDITERRANEO(Touchstone, rated R, 1991)Wisely, the producers put the dedication at the end of the film because viewers wouldn't understand the reference for the first 75 minutes of this 100-minute movie. Until then, this Academy Award winner for Best Foreign Language Film doesn't seem to have much point.It's a simple story of a band of misfit Italian sailors who are assigned to invade a remote enemy Greek island during World War II. They quickly become stranded and break their radio to cut themselves off from their commanders and the rest of the world.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 9, 2007
Sibling rivalry replaces the romantic triangle as the pop-culture mainstay in the week's most-hyped openings - a botched Yuletide comedy and a deliberately excruciating thriller. In each, a roly-poly brother who appears to have his life and career under control ropes his scrawnier, seedier sibling into an insane enterprise that threatens to go kaput long before the final curtain. Before The Devil Knows You're Dead (THINKfilm) Starring Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ethan Hawke, Marisa Tomei, Albert Finney.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter | March 12, 1992
"Article 99" is a comedy-drama that explores the madness ongoing in an understaffed, underbudgeted, overcrowded VA hospital. Kiefer Sutherland and Ray Liotta are among the doctors struggling with the system. Rated R."American Me" follows as a charismatic and gifted Hispanic-American rises in the world. Unfortunately, the profession he has chosen is crime, and he manages to run the Los Angeles chapter of the Mexican mafia from Folsome prison. Edward James Olmos stars and directed. Rated R."
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