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By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | July 16, 2000
If you've ever compared the taste of good homemade jam with its commercial counterpart, you can appreciate how much select ingredients and small-batch cooking contribute to the quality of the finished product. Some of the best fruits for homemade jam are tart apples, tart blackberries, cranberries, plums and red currants, which are high in pectin and acid. (Low-pectin fruits, such as strawberries, cherries, peaches and raspberries, require commercial pectins to give them enough body.) Strictly defined, jam is the result of cooking fruits with sugar to preserve them until the mixture thickens to a spreadable consistency.
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NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | July 16, 2000
If you've ever compared the taste of good homemade jam with its commercial counterpart, you can appreciate how much select ingredients and small-batch cooking contribute to the quality of the finished product. Some of the best fruits for homemade jam are tart apples, tart blackberries, cranberries, plums and red currants, which are high in pectin and acid. (Low-pectin fruits, such as strawberries, cherries, peaches and raspberries, require commercial pectins to give them enough body.) Strictly defined, jam is the result of cooking fruits with sugar to preserve them until the mixture thickens to a spreadable consistency.
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By Marian Burros and Marian Burros,New York Times News Service | September 15, 1991
Walnut Creek, Calif -- Marion Cunningham, whose lively revision of the prim and outmoded "Fannie Farmer Cookbook" has made it once again a kitchen standard, is talking on her kitchen phone."
FEATURES
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff | February 17, 1999
Now that many of your New Year's resolutions have vanished into the oblivion of good intentions, it's time to tackle the one that really matters -- the 1999 Declaration of the Stomach.You know, a pledge to return to real food for dinner in a move toward culinary independence. The vow that lets you jettison the grocer's gooey rotisserie bird and skip those frozen microwave feasts.With this promise, you are determined to return to the kitchen, a place where turning out easy, healthy dishes -- even in the midst of the daily rush -- becomes fun again.
FEATURES
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff | February 17, 1999
Now that many of your New Year's resolutions have vanished into the oblivion of good intentions, it's time to tackle the one that really matters -- the 1999 Declaration of the Stomach.You know, a pledge to return to real food for dinner in a move toward culinary independence. The vow that lets you jettison the grocer's gooey rotisserie bird and skip those frozen microwave feasts.With this promise, you are determined to return to the kitchen, a place where turning out easy, healthy dishes -- even in the midst of the daily rush -- becomes fun again.
FEATURES
September 11, 1991
If it weren't for a Vassar College student who botched a recipe for making caramels or toffee, we may never have come to know the joys of fudge.Karen Milbourn, spokeswoman for Fanny Farmer Candy Shops, reports that even though the details are sketchy, the enterprising student was undaunted when she "fudged" the recipe and eventually wound up selling the confection in a local grocery store for 40 cents a pound. That was in 1886.Apparently word about the "failure" spread -- at least among the Seven Sisters colleges -- because 12 years later a Wellesley College student wrote about fudge-making in her yearbook.
NEWS
By Charlotte Balcomb Lane and Charlotte Balcomb Lane,Orlando Sentinel | January 30, 1994
Title: "James Beard: A Biography"Author: Robert ClarkPublisher: HarperCollinsLength, price: 357 pages, $27.50 The adage that the more things change, the more they stay the same is apparent in America's attitudes toward food -- at least according to Robert Clark in his biography of the late cookbook author, writer and schmoozemeister James Beard.In making his assessment of American food mores, Mr. Clark takes the long view, covering not just the 46 years of Beard's career, but more than 120 years of societal and dietary changes.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 20, 1991
The following are three versions of Caesar salad from three great chefs, Julia Child, Bradley Ogden and Marion Cunningham. Ms. Cunningham's recipe was adapted from an article written for the Los Angeles Times.Julia's CaesarServes four to six.From "From Julia Child's Kitchen" (Alfred A. Knopf).2 large, crisp heads romaine lettuce2 large cloves garlicsaltolive oil2 cups unseasoned, homemade croutons (see below)2 eggsfreshly ground black pepperjuice of 1 lemonWorcestershire sauce1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, freshly gratedFor each person, select 6 to 8 whole, unblemished leaves of romaine, each 3 to 7 inches long.
FEATURES
By Seattle Times | December 18, 1991
stress syndrome strikes, you need some handy antidotes. So here's a potpourri of advice and tips designed to be of comfort. We offer this wit and wisdom gleaned from various cookbooks:* Before washing any pot, skillet or casserole, wipe it out first with paper towels or used paper dinner napkins to remove as much fat and bits of food as possible. This makes after-dinner pot scrubbing less burdensome and helps prevent the clogging of your sink's pipes. -- "Monday to Friday Cookbook" by Michele Urvater.
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By Pat Dailey and Pat Dailey,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 19, 1996
Tastes change and so do recipes, in style and substance. The proof, in this case, can be found in corn bread. A look at three versions of this American classic shows evolutions in technique, taste and recipe form."
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By Marian Burros and Marian Burros,New York Times News Service | September 15, 1991
Walnut Creek, Calif -- Marion Cunningham, whose lively revision of the prim and outmoded "Fannie Farmer Cookbook" has made it once again a kitchen standard, is talking on her kitchen phone."
FEATURES
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,Knight Ridder/Tribune Sun academic intern Emily Schuster contributed to this article | April 22, 1998
Of all the things you might expect to take on social or historical significance, deviled eggs are probably pretty low on the list. You just boil some eggs, mash the yolks with mayonnaise and mustard, maybe a little pickle relish. Spoon the mixture back into those convenient holes in the egg whites, then sprinkle the whole mess with paprika. What could possibly be meaningful about that?OK, here's one thing: deviled egg as social code. In "The $H Southern Belle Primer" (Doubleday, 1991), author Marilyn Schwartz defined a whole class of women by whether they made their deviled eggs with mayonnaise and served them on their own plate.
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By Florence Fabricant and Florence Fabricant,New York Times News Service | May 10, 1995
The late James Beard is most often remembered as an advocate of American cookery, and the awards given in his name on Monday night were described by Donna Hanover Giuliani, who was the host of the event with Robin Leach, as "a testimony to American cuisine."But at the reception at the Marriott Marquis in Manhattan, the food was strictly Mediterranean."Every other year we have an American theme, but this was an off-year," said Peter Kump, the president of the James Beard Foundation, which runs the awards.
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