Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMario Venzago
IN THE NEWS

Mario Venzago

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 1996
The program that guest conductor Mario Venzago performed with the Baltimore Symphony last night in Meyerhoff Hall was not the sort most listeners (or musicians) would choose in order to hear what a conductor was capable of.On this lightweight program -- which was not chosen by the Swiss conductor -- the deepest music was the Piano Concerto in F Minor by the teen-age Frederic Chopin. The rest consisted of operatic overtures by Donizetti and Rossini and selections from Bizet's "so-called" -- so-called because the composer had nothing to do with the arrangement -- "Carmen" Suites.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 29, 2002
There really was quite a twist to the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's second installment in its new "Symphony With a Twist" series. Where the first program back in the fall was basically a souped-up greatest-hits affair (the twist came in the limes served with cocktails in the lobby), this one offered a bracing jolt of 20th-century sounds and ideas, undiluted by any dumbing-down. Part of the sizzle on Saturday evening came just from the chance to hear the BSO dig into so much repertoire that, while technically far from contemporary, still sounds contemporary.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 15, 1999
Like former Baltimore Symphony music director David Zinman, conductor Mario Venzago is conversant with scholarship about performance practice in the classical era. And, like Zinman, the Swiss conductor has paid attention to the lessons taught by performances of the Haydn-Mozart-Beethoven repertory on period instruments.It's scarcely a surprise, therefore, that Venzago's performance of Beethoven's Fourth Symphony with the BSO Saturday evening in Meyerhoff Hall shared certain characteristics with those given by Zinman.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 9, 2001
The heartiest ovation at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Friday evening was reserved for Mario Venzago, the Swiss conductor who wrapped up his second season as artistic director of Summer MusicFest with another typically enthusiastic presentation of another typically imaginative program. His musical gifts and personal charm have understandably earned him a strong following. Venzago's approach to this annual festival by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra combines substantive repertoire and entertainment value in roughly equal proportions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 2, 2000
"It's wonderful here," Mario Venzago says with a wide smile, his eyes twinkling behind subtly black-and-white striped designer eyewear. As the conductor makes his way to a dressing room at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, he exudes enthusiasm, a trait also very much in evidence later as he bounds onstage to lead the opening concert of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's Summer MusicFest. In his soft Germanic accent, the Swiss-born Venzago gives the audience an animated description of the dramatic impulses behind music from Mozart's "Idomeneo."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 15, 1999
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will announce today that it has named Swiss conductor Mario Venzago as the new artistic director of Summer MusicFest.Venzago, who first conducted the orchestra in 1995 and who will lead all five programs of MusicFest in June and July, calls the appointment his "first little step into the United States."For the Baltimore Symphony, however, it is a major appointment. Venzago, who succeeds Pinchas Zukerman in the post, inherits a summer series that seems to have lost its sense of purpose several years ago and that has been playing each season to ever-smaller audiences.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 27, 1996
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra unveiled a new look yesterday when it announced its programs, soloists and guest conductors for the 1996-1997 season and for the Summer MusicFest Series this July and August.Pinchas Zukerman and Marvin Hamlisch, respectively the newly appointed music directors of the Summer MusicFest and the SuperPops series, will conduct their first concerts. Several relatively unfamiliar faces, particularly that of Swiss conductor Mario Venzago, and some brand new ones will be very familiar to BSO audiences by next season's end. Several internationally celebrated musicians, such as the pianists Andras Schiff, Horacio Gutierrez and Radu Lupu, will make long-awaited reappearances.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 1, 1996
The program of last night's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Summer MusicFest concert in Meyerhoff Hall was probably more difficult for Mario Venzago to prepare than it would have been for Pinchas Zukerman, who planned all the programs in this year's festival.For Zukerman, the new artistic director of Summer MusicFest, moving from Mozart backward to Vivaldi and then forward to Stravinsky would have required much less effort than for Venzago.Zukerman and Venzago are the same age, 48. But the former has been relatively untouched by the authenticity-in-music movement; he does not conceive of performing music from different eras in markedly different ways -- he just plays.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 4, 1996
The big surprise about last night's Baltimore Symphony concert in Meyerhoff Hall should have been the appearance of conductor Alan Gilbert as a near-to-last-minute replacement for Mario Venzago, who was injured last week in an automobile accident.While the debut of Gilbert, the young assistant conductor of the Cleveland Orchestra, was auspicious, what really astonished the ear was Horacio Gutierrez' utterly fresh and beguiling interpretation of Brahms' Second Piano Concerto in B-flat.The common wisdom about the difference between the B-flat concerto and its predecessor in D minor is that the earlier piece is passionate, tormented and dramatic and that the later one is Olympian and serene.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 18, 1996
Mario Venzago has just learned something conductors usually hate to hear.Venzago's piano soloist in his concerts with the Baltimore Symphony this week is reputed to take rhythmic liberties in performances of Romantic music -- such as the Chopin Concerto No. 2 on this week's program.Such a soloist can make life difficult for a conductor because flexible tempos are hard to follow. BSO music director David Zinman once described an encounter with such an errant pianist in the same Chopin concerto this way: "You watch your life pass in front of your eyes."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 2, 2000
"It's wonderful here," Mario Venzago says with a wide smile, his eyes twinkling behind subtly black-and-white striped designer eyewear. As the conductor makes his way to a dressing room at Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, he exudes enthusiasm, a trait also very much in evidence later as he bounds onstage to lead the opening concert of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's Summer MusicFest. In his soft Germanic accent, the Swiss-born Venzago gives the audience an animated description of the dramatic impulses behind music from Mozart's "Idomeneo."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 15, 1999
The Baltimore Symphony Orchestra will announce today that it has named Swiss conductor Mario Venzago as the new artistic director of Summer MusicFest.Venzago, who first conducted the orchestra in 1995 and who will lead all five programs of MusicFest in June and July, calls the appointment his "first little step into the United States."For the Baltimore Symphony, however, it is a major appointment. Venzago, who succeeds Pinchas Zukerman in the post, inherits a summer series that seems to have lost its sense of purpose several years ago and that has been playing each season to ever-smaller audiences.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 15, 1999
Like former Baltimore Symphony music director David Zinman, conductor Mario Venzago is conversant with scholarship about performance practice in the classical era. And, like Zinman, the Swiss conductor has paid attention to the lessons taught by performances of the Haydn-Mozart-Beethoven repertory on period instruments.It's scarcely a surprise, therefore, that Venzago's performance of Beethoven's Fourth Symphony with the BSO Saturday evening in Meyerhoff Hall shared certain characteristics with those given by Zinman.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 1, 1998
An orchestra that must spend a season without a music director -- as the Baltimore Symphony will do in next season's interregnum between David Zinman and Yuri Temirkanov -- has to solve two problems.It has to keep the level of its ensemble playing high -- something that will prove difficult enough when an orchestra has been accustomed to Zinman's superb ear for balances and his almost microscopically accurate beat.And it must sustain the interest of audiences in the absence of the continuity usually provided by a music director.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 19, 1996
The program that guest conductor Mario Venzago performed with the Baltimore Symphony last night in Meyerhoff Hall was not the sort most listeners (or musicians) would choose in order to hear what a conductor was capable of.On this lightweight program -- which was not chosen by the Swiss conductor -- the deepest music was the Piano Concerto in F Minor by the teen-age Frederic Chopin. The rest consisted of operatic overtures by Donizetti and Rossini and selections from Bizet's "so-called" -- so-called because the composer had nothing to do with the arrangement -- "Carmen" Suites.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 18, 1996
Mario Venzago has just learned something conductors usually hate to hear.Venzago's piano soloist in his concerts with the Baltimore Symphony this week is reputed to take rhythmic liberties in performances of Romantic music -- such as the Chopin Concerto No. 2 on this week's program.Such a soloist can make life difficult for a conductor because flexible tempos are hard to follow. BSO music director David Zinman once described an encounter with such an errant pianist in the same Chopin concerto this way: "You watch your life pass in front of your eyes."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 1, 1998
An orchestra that must spend a season without a music director -- as the Baltimore Symphony will do in next season's interregnum between David Zinman and Yuri Temirkanov -- has to solve two problems.It has to keep the level of its ensemble playing high -- something that will prove difficult enough when an orchestra has been accustomed to Zinman's superb ear for balances and his almost microscopically accurate beat.And it must sustain the interest of audiences in the absence of the continuity usually provided by a music director.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 9, 2001
The heartiest ovation at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall Friday evening was reserved for Mario Venzago, the Swiss conductor who wrapped up his second season as artistic director of Summer MusicFest with another typically enthusiastic presentation of another typically imaginative program. His musical gifts and personal charm have understandably earned him a strong following. Venzago's approach to this annual festival by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra combines substantive repertoire and entertainment value in roughly equal proportions.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 4, 1996
The big surprise about last night's Baltimore Symphony concert in Meyerhoff Hall should have been the appearance of conductor Alan Gilbert as a near-to-last-minute replacement for Mario Venzago, who was injured last week in an automobile accident.While the debut of Gilbert, the young assistant conductor of the Cleveland Orchestra, was auspicious, what really astonished the ear was Horacio Gutierrez' utterly fresh and beguiling interpretation of Brahms' Second Piano Concerto in B-flat.The common wisdom about the difference between the B-flat concerto and its predecessor in D minor is that the earlier piece is passionate, tormented and dramatic and that the later one is Olympian and serene.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 1, 1996
The program of last night's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Summer MusicFest concert in Meyerhoff Hall was probably more difficult for Mario Venzago to prepare than it would have been for Pinchas Zukerman, who planned all the programs in this year's festival.For Zukerman, the new artistic director of Summer MusicFest, moving from Mozart backward to Vivaldi and then forward to Stravinsky would have required much less effort than for Venzago.Zukerman and Venzago are the same age, 48. But the former has been relatively untouched by the authenticity-in-music movement; he does not conceive of performing music from different eras in markedly different ways -- he just plays.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.