Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMario Puzo
IN THE NEWS

Mario Puzo

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Fred Bruning and Fred Bruning,NEWSDAY | July 31, 1996
BAY SHORE, N.Y. -- Even without guarantee of immunity, Mario Puzo admits he's a con man. What he knows about the Mafia comes from books. What he knows about the dagger, the pistol, the garrote is mostly that they can kill you. What he knows about criminal conspiracies is limited to the time he kited checks against his credit cards, which turned out OK because he got rich before the banks started prosecuting."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 2, 2000
The year was 1967: "In the stone-filled village of Castellammare del Golfo facing the dark Sicilian Mediterranean, a great Mafia Don lay dying. Vincenzo Zeno was a man of honor, who all his life had been loved for his fair and impartial judgment, his help to those in need, and his implacable punishment of those who dared to oppose his will." So begins the prologue of "Omerta" by Mario Puzo (Random House, 316 pages, $25.95). Puzo died last July at 78, after a tough battle with heart disease and diabetes.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOK EDITOR | July 3, 1999
Mario Puzo, godfather of the Godfathers, died yesterday at home in Bay Shore, Long Island. His 78-year-old heart failed, those close to him said.You might say it was business: He had suffered a near-fatal heart attack in 1991 in Las Vegas, a city he loved for its gaming and its richer associated cultures. Quadruple-bypass surgery then sent him back to the keyboard. He soon began work on "The Last Don" (1996) his eighth novel. Shortly before he died, his agent and editors said, he completed a ninth, "Omerta," scheduled for publication in July 2000.
FEATURES
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOK EDITOR | July 3, 1999
Mario Puzo, godfather of the Godfathers, died yesterday at home in Bay Shore, Long Island. His 78-year-old heart failed, those close to him said.You might say it was business: He had suffered a near-fatal heart attack in 1991 in Las Vegas, a city he loved for its gaming and its richer associated cultures. Quadruple-bypass surgery then sent him back to the keyboard. He soon began work on "The Last Don" (1996) his eighth novel. Shortly before he died, his agent and editors said, he completed a ninth, "Omerta," scheduled for publication in July 2000.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder RrB | May 22, 1991
You can rest easy. The producers of that much-delayed "Christopher Columbus" opus, scripted by Mario Puzo, have finally announced their director.They plan to set sail with George P. Cosmatos at the helm. He's the man behind such sensitive historical re-enactments as "Rambo: First Blood Part II" and "Cobra."
FEATURES
By Susan King and LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- In the 1972 film "Play It Again, Sam," Woody Allen's nebbish hero was so obsessed with Humphrey Bogart in "Casablanca" that he enlisted the ghost of the legendary '40s tough guy to coach him on how to impress girls."
NEWS
By JIM HANER and JIM HANER,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1996
"The Last Don," by Mario Puzo. Random House, 482 pages, $25.95.A graying Sicilian patriarch stands on the balcony of his Long Island estate, surveying the festivities on the lawn below. His guests, the usual Mafia kingpins and trusted lieutenants, sip wine and eat rare cheeses. Children cavort nearby. An orchestra plays.It's a christening for the newest members of the Don's family, his nephew and his grandson. Their names are, get this, Crossifixio and Dante. You just know there's going to be hell to pay when these little guys grow up.So begins the latest of Mario Puzo's trademark Mafia sagas, it is a propulsive tale of power, greed, deceit and, oh yes, murder.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- In the 1972 film ``Play It Again, Sam,'' Woody Allen's nebbish hero was so obsessed with Humphrey Bogart in ``Casablanca'' that he enlisted the ghost of the legendary '40s tough guy to coach him on how to impress girls.``Casablanca'' and Bogey may have been the role models for Allen's generation, but as director Nora Ephron cleverly illustrates in her latest film, ``You've Got Mail,'' which stars Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, it's Francis Ford Coppola's Oscar-winning 1972 classic ``The Godfather'' that's become the ultimate guy's movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 2, 2000
The year was 1967: "In the stone-filled village of Castellammare del Golfo facing the dark Sicilian Mediterranean, a great Mafia Don lay dying. Vincenzo Zeno was a man of honor, who all his life had been loved for his fair and impartial judgment, his help to those in need, and his implacable punishment of those who dared to oppose his will." So begins the prologue of "Omerta" by Mario Puzo (Random House, 316 pages, $25.95). Puzo died last July at 78, after a tough battle with heart disease and diabetes.
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1996
Is reading dead? Of course not. More books are being bought - and, presumably, read - than ever before. Drop by Bibelot or Borders and you'll see that the book business is booming. But before you breathe that proverbial sigh of relief, take a closer look at what the customers around you are buying. The experience may make you think twice about the future of reading.I offer in evidence the best-seller list published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New York Times Book Review, which contained not one current novel that was "serious" in any recognizable sense of the word.
FEATURES
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- In the 1972 film ``Play It Again, Sam,'' Woody Allen's nebbish hero was so obsessed with Humphrey Bogart in ``Casablanca'' that he enlisted the ghost of the legendary '40s tough guy to coach him on how to impress girls.``Casablanca'' and Bogey may have been the role models for Allen's generation, but as director Nora Ephron cleverly illustrates in her latest film, ``You've Got Mail,'' which stars Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan, it's Francis Ford Coppola's Oscar-winning 1972 classic ``The Godfather'' that's become the ultimate guy's movie.
FEATURES
By Susan King and LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 1999
HOLLYWOOD -- In the 1972 film "Play It Again, Sam," Woody Allen's nebbish hero was so obsessed with Humphrey Bogart in "Casablanca" that he enlisted the ghost of the legendary '40s tough guy to coach him on how to impress girls."
NEWS
By Terry Teachout and Terry Teachout,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1996
Is reading dead? Of course not. More books are being bought - and, presumably, read - than ever before. Drop by Bibelot or Borders and you'll see that the book business is booming. But before you breathe that proverbial sigh of relief, take a closer look at what the customers around you are buying. The experience may make you think twice about the future of reading.I offer in evidence the best-seller list published in the Oct. 6 issue of the New York Times Book Review, which contained not one current novel that was "serious" in any recognizable sense of the word.
NEWS
By JIM HANER and JIM HANER,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1996
"The Last Don," by Mario Puzo. Random House, 482 pages, $25.95.A graying Sicilian patriarch stands on the balcony of his Long Island estate, surveying the festivities on the lawn below. His guests, the usual Mafia kingpins and trusted lieutenants, sip wine and eat rare cheeses. Children cavort nearby. An orchestra plays.It's a christening for the newest members of the Don's family, his nephew and his grandson. Their names are, get this, Crossifixio and Dante. You just know there's going to be hell to pay when these little guys grow up.So begins the latest of Mario Puzo's trademark Mafia sagas, it is a propulsive tale of power, greed, deceit and, oh yes, murder.
FEATURES
By Fred Bruning and Fred Bruning,NEWSDAY | July 31, 1996
BAY SHORE, N.Y. -- Even without guarantee of immunity, Mario Puzo admits he's a con man. What he knows about the Mafia comes from books. What he knows about the dagger, the pistol, the garrote is mostly that they can kill you. What he knows about criminal conspiracies is limited to the time he kited checks against his credit cards, which turned out OK because he got rich before the banks started prosecuting."
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder RrB | May 22, 1991
You can rest easy. The producers of that much-delayed "Christopher Columbus" opus, scripted by Mario Puzo, have finally announced their director.They plan to set sail with George P. Cosmatos at the helm. He's the man behind such sensitive historical re-enactments as "Rambo: First Blood Part II" and "Cobra."
NEWS
July 25, 1999
Henry Walter Brosin, a former president of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, the American Psychiatric Association and the American College of Psychiatrists, died July 3 in Tucson, Ariz.He was 94.Barbara Raskin, author of feminist novels about women in middle age, most notably "Hot Flashes," died Friday of complications after surgery for vascular disease. She was 63 and lived in Washington.Published in 1987, two decades after the women's movement kicked into gear, "Hot Flashes" was considered an important work for its celebration of female friendship.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Is there room on the Atlantic Ocean -- and on the big screen -- for two Christopher Columbuses?There was room last week in the trade papers for splashy multi-page ads touting two such projects, both to be released in 1992 to capitalize on the 500th anniversary of the Italian explorer's voyage to North America in the service of Spain.Producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind are working with a script by Mario Puzo, "Christopher Columbus: The Movie," with plans to begin shooting in April.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.