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Mario Lanza

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By Roberta Sandler and Roberta Sandler,Special to the Sun | March 14, 2004
One afternoon in 1959, I came home from high school to find my mother in tears. "I have bad news," she said. "Mario Lanza died today." I, too, burst into tears, mourning the end of the golden voice that had made Mario Lanza's movies so popular and that had crowned him as the Enrico Caruso of the 1950s. When he died in Rome, he was 38 years old. Flash forward to several months ago. I made my first visit to Philadelphia. There, I discovered not only the Mario Lanza Museum, but also the Mario Lanza Institute, Mario Lanza Park, Mario Lanza mural and Mario Lanza's birthplace.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | January 19, 2010
A half-century after his untimely death at the age of 38, celebrated tenor and movie star Mario Lanza is receiving fresh medical attention from a Baltimore doctor who takes a dim view of one of the singer's weight-loss treatments - injections of the urine of pregnant women, a controversial therapy with new followers today. Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, vice chairman of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Medical Care Clinical Center at the Veterans Administration Hospital downtown, teamed up with Armando Cesari, Lanza's Australia-based biographer, for an article about the singer's health issues just out in The Pharos, the journal of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha.
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FEATURES
By Rip Rense and Rip Rense,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 1998
Michael Bolton contorts his way through a new album ofoperatic arias. Aretha Franklin struggles through Puccini's "Nessun Dorma" at the Grammy Awards. The Three Tenors are && almost as popular as Elvis.Opera is no longer longhair (or blue hair) music. At sellout performances across the country, Verdi and Leoncavallo are often the hottest dates in town. And the matinee idol/tenor who first made operatic singing a hot date with mass audiences 48 years ago -- Mario Lanza -- seems to be making a comeback.
TRAVEL
By Roberta Sandler and Roberta Sandler,Special to the Sun | March 14, 2004
One afternoon in 1959, I came home from high school to find my mother in tears. "I have bad news," she said. "Mario Lanza died today." I, too, burst into tears, mourning the end of the golden voice that had made Mario Lanza's movies so popular and that had crowned him as the Enrico Caruso of the 1950s. When he died in Rome, he was 38 years old. Flash forward to several months ago. I made my first visit to Philadelphia. There, I discovered not only the Mario Lanza Museum, but also the Mario Lanza Institute, Mario Lanza Park, Mario Lanza mural and Mario Lanza's birthplace.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
A half-century after his untimely death at the age of 38, celebrated tenor and movie star Mario Lanza is receiving fresh medical attention from a Baltimore doctor who takes a dim view of one of the singer's weight-loss treatments - injections of the urine of pregnant women, a controversial therapy with new followers today. Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, vice chairman of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Medical Care Clinical Center at the Veterans Administration Hospital downtown, teamed up with Armando Cesari, Lanza's Australia-based biographer, for an article about the singer's health issues just out in The Pharos, the journal of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1997
As Joan Crawford in the movie "Mommie Dearest," Faye Dunaway raised a coat hanger in order to get her way. As Maria Callas in Terrence McNally's Tony Award-winning play "Master Class," Dunaway only has to raise her voice to an apprentice singer, and the nervous young vocalist is reduced to tears. Call her Diva Dearest.A star vehicle that suits the ultra-thin and still-beautiful Dunaway as well as the elegant black pantsuit she wears with such flair, "Master Class" also suits the Lyric Opera House.
FEATURES
August 28, 1993
Maryland Public Television's August pledge drive exceeded its goals of $400,000 and 6,000 new members.The final tally for the 10-day pledge drive was $411,665 collected from 5,626 on-air pledges and 1,688 challenge-grant pledges.The programs that pulled the most dollars included "The Peter, Paul and Mary Marathon," "The Judds -- Their Final Concert," "The Jacques Pepin Live National Pledge Marathon," "The Moody Blues in Concert at Red Rocks," "So Far: The Grateful Dead," "Carreras, Domingo and Pavarotti in Concert" and "Mario Lanza: The American Caruso."
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 26, 2006
Mario Lanza didn't enjoy a long or critically beatified career, but the movie star tenor sure left a legacy of inspiration. He has been mentioned as a prime influence on the early development of many singers, from pop crooner Al Martino to all of the famed Three Tenors. Baltimore Opera Company presents La Boheme at 8:15 p.m. Saturday, 7:30 p.m. May 3, 8:15 p.m. May 5 and 6, 3 p.m. May 7 at Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Tickets $50 to $137. Call 410-727-6000 or visit baltimoreopera.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | September 8, 1996
Her name wasn't Posie, but I called her that in the newspaper to protect her identity and whatever shreds were left of her modesty. That's the first thing you need to know. The second thing is this: She used to stand on the parking lot in front of the 7-Eleven on Patapsco Avenue, in Brooklyn, where she made a living at $20 a half-hour as a prostitute.I made Posie's acquaintance (and nothing more) when she telephoned the newspaper where I used to work, called the News American, for reasons that have since fled.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | February 20, 2010
KATHRYN GRAYSON , 88 Actress, singer who starred in MGM films Kathryn Grayson, an MGM singing star in the 1940s and early 1950s in musicals such as "Anchors Aweigh," "Show Boat" and "Kiss Me Kate," died Wednesday of natural causes at her home in Los Angeles, said publicist Dale Olson. A dark-haired beauty with a heart-shaped face and a brilliant coloratura voice, Ms. Grayson signed with MGM as a teenager and made her screen debut in "Andy Hardy's Private Secretary," starring Mickey Rooney, in 1941.
FEATURES
By Rip Rense and Rip Rense,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 30, 1998
Michael Bolton contorts his way through a new album ofoperatic arias. Aretha Franklin struggles through Puccini's "Nessun Dorma" at the Grammy Awards. The Three Tenors are && almost as popular as Elvis.Opera is no longer longhair (or blue hair) music. At sellout performances across the country, Verdi and Leoncavallo are often the hottest dates in town. And the matinee idol/tenor who first made operatic singing a hot date with mass audiences 48 years ago -- Mario Lanza -- seems to be making a comeback.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 24, 1997
As Joan Crawford in the movie "Mommie Dearest," Faye Dunaway raised a coat hanger in order to get her way. As Maria Callas in Terrence McNally's Tony Award-winning play "Master Class," Dunaway only has to raise her voice to an apprentice singer, and the nervous young vocalist is reduced to tears. Call her Diva Dearest.A star vehicle that suits the ultra-thin and still-beautiful Dunaway as well as the elegant black pantsuit she wears with such flair, "Master Class" also suits the Lyric Opera House.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2005
There may never be another three operatic tenors packing the combined vocal and star power of Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras, but there are at least three highly marketable singers who have demonstrated an exceptional ability to stir the public. Call them the poperatic tenors. Heading the list of these mass-appeal vocalists, who cross back and forth between classical and pop idioms easily and who generate unusually effusive fans, is Andrea Bocelli. The blind Italian singer soared to fame and fortune in the 1990s, given an extra boost by heavy exposure on American public television.
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