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Mario Andretti

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By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
Some things never change. As you walk around the hospitality and pit areas at an IZOD IndyCar race you can still find Mario Andretti signing autographs more than five decades since he drove his first racecar in competitive open wheel racing. Andretti, the most versatile American racecar driver in history, is at age 71, theoretically, long retired. But that's hard to prove. Over four decades beginning in the 1960s he won four Indy Car championships and became the only driver in motorsports history to win the Indianapolis 500 (1969)
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By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
The skeptics have followed Marco Andretti ever since he was old enough to drive a go-kart. Just as the offspring and siblings of stars in other sports often struggle to live up to the family name, Andretti's accomplishments in his eight-year IndyCar Series career have paled in comparison to his father, Michael, whose own career fell in the shadow of legendary family patriarch Mario Andretti. Initially, Marco quieted the whispers when he finished a close second in his Indianapolis 500 debut in 2006 and three months later won his first IndyCar race as a 19-year-old rookie.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
Mario Andretti has always been willing to spread his wings. If he saw a race car that interested him, he'd drive it. It didn't matter if it was his favorite open-wheel Indy car, a Formula One car, a sprint car, a stock car, a sports car or a hybrid. "All my life, I've tried to win outside my box, if you will," Andretti says. At 60, he has been at it again. Recently he drove in the 24 Hours of LeMans in an attempt to win the only big race that has eluded him. It was an effort that fascinated many because of his age, because of his desire and because he is one of a declining breed.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
She shares his surname, athleticism and demeanor, those who know her say. But Jillian Unitas, 22, is determined to blaze her own trail in the sports world, apart from that set by her late grandfather. Unitas, media manager for this weekend's Grand Prix of Baltimore, is kin to Johnny Unitas, former Baltimore Colts quarterback and Pro Football Hall of Famer. It's a badge she wears proudly - but with care. "I've never wanted to disappoint my last name, so I put a lot of pressure on myself," said Unitas, of Baldwin, who graduated from Flagler College (Fla.)
SPORTS
August 2, 1992
BROOKLYN, Mich. -- An all-out, hold-the-pedal-to-the-floor speed show is the forecast for today's IndyCar race on Michigan International Speedway's two-mile, high-banked oval."
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2013
The skeptics have followed Marco Andretti ever since he was old enough to drive a go-kart. Just as the offspring and siblings of stars in other sports often struggle to live up to the family name, Andretti's accomplishments in his eight-year IndyCar Series career have paled in comparison to his father, Michael, whose own career fell in the shadow of legendary family patriarch Mario Andretti. Initially, Marco quieted the whispers when he finished a close second in his Indianapolis 500 debut in 2006 and three months later won his first IndyCar race as a 19-year-old rookie.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 22, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- The final day of practice for Sunday's Indianapolis 500 came and went without mishap yesterday.Mario Andretti, driving his Lola/Ford Cosworth XB, was fastest on the track, hitting 226.409 mph.Andretti's front-row mates in Sunday's 76th annual Indianapolis 500 also were among the top five fastest. Eddie Cheever clocked 224.921, and pole-sitter Roberto Guerrero notched 224.899 mph.Arie Lyuendyk (225.423) and Michael Andretti (225.220) showed they were up to speed with the second and third fastest laps of the day.*Driver relief: Drivers were feeling somewhat better about the new caution rules after a drivers meeting yesterday, where the U.S. Automobile Club announced it will continue the 100-mph speed limit on pit road.
SPORTS
August 26, 1991
DENVER -- Al Unser Jr. blew away from the rest of the 24-car field yesterday to win his second straight Texaco-Havoline Grand Prix and move solidly into the race for the Indy-car championship.Unser never was headed, holding off a mild challenge from Emerson Fittipaldi at the end to win his second race of the season and the 17th of his career.Michael Andretti finished third, cutting Bobby Rahal's CART PPG Cup points lead to 141-132. Rahal's engine blew on lap 28. Unser moved to third with 129 points after 12 of 17 races.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | October 3, 1992
NAZARETH, Pa. -- Mario Andretti looked at the starting lineup for today's All-Star Marlboro Challenge and winced. Fate had done him wrong."The year I had the most points by winning the most poles, they put all the names in the hat and made us draw for starting positions, and I drew last," Andretti recalled. "Now, I have the fewest poles, and they decide the starting lineup will be based on points from winning poles and races. And I'm almost last again."Is this any way to treat a motor sports icon?
SPORTS
July 8, 1991
CLEVELAND -- The pass was less daring but just as effective yesterday, as Michael Andretti got past Emerson Fittipaldi and went on to a victory in the Cleveland Grand Prix.Andretti, who picked up his second win in a row and third of the season, made a heart-thumping move between Fittipaldi and Rick Mears two weeks ago at Portland, Ore. He got away with it and won the race.This time, it took the second-generation Indy-car star until the 53rd of 85 laps on the 2.37-mile, 10-turn temporary road circuit to get to the front for good.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
Ten months ago, IZOD IndyCar Series owner and promoter Michael Andretti and his chief marketing officer John Lopes stood beside the then-Baltimore Grand Prix course and marveled at the crowd and the energy filling the space around them. "This would be a great event to be part of one day," Andretti said to Lopes. Now, Andretti and his sports management company, Andretti Sports Marketing, are less than eight weeks from opening the gates on the new Grand Prix of Baltimore with Race On LLC, headed by partners J.P. Grant and Greg O'Neill.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Before glossy race cars careen around downtown streets over Labor Day weekend, another high-speed race must be run. The team promoting Baltimore's Grand Prix - a group announced by city officials this week after the collapse of two other race organizers - has less than four months to hawk sponsorships, market the event, sell tickets and set up the racecourse and grandstands. Sports marketing experts say Race On, the new organizers that include racing champion Michael Andretti, must make those tasks their top priorities and also reassure racing fans that the event is on despite months of setbacks.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
When he was growing up in Towson, JF Thormann could not, in his wildest fantasies, have imagined a day when downtown Baltimore would be turned into a IndyCar racetrack. He did, however, frequently spend his afternoons and evenings pretending there was a Grand Prix racetrack in the parking lot of Goucher College, where his father was a professor. "I'm not sure my father knows that," Thormann said with a sheepish chuckle. "But I used to practice there a lot. I also burned up a lot of road around the Loch Raven Reservoir.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
You have to give Marco Andretti credit. He's an Indy Car driver, which would be something for any 24-year-old to be proud of. But for Andretti, having the guts to choose that profession is something many twenty-somethings wouldn't want to take on. His father is Michael Andretti, the third-winningest driver in Indy Car history. His grandfather is Mario Andretti, the most versatile American driver in motorsports history. Marco said he might be feeling that pressure — if he had ever known anything else.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
Some things never change. As you walk around the hospitality and pit areas at an IZOD IndyCar race you can still find Mario Andretti signing autographs more than five decades since he drove his first racecar in competitive open wheel racing. Andretti, the most versatile American racecar driver in history, is at age 71, theoretically, long retired. But that's hard to prove. Over four decades beginning in the 1960s he won four Indy Car championships and became the only driver in motorsports history to win the Indianapolis 500 (1969)
FEATURES
By Rick Chillot and Rick Chillot,MORNING CALL | December 30, 2006
Once, a man's home was his castle. These days, he's lucky if he gets a corner of the garage to call his own. "Women typically have control of the house," says Sam Martin, author of the new book Manspace: A Primal Guide to Marking Your Territory (Taunton Press, $24.95). "And the guy's stuff gets pushed into some closet or relegated to a bedside table." But as Martin's book documents, some men push back. Flip through the chapters and you'll find an amateur astronomer's private observatory, a Japan buff's rustic teahouse, a hunter's collection of more than 300 taxidermy specimens.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | May 24, 1991
INDIANAPOLIS -- The front row for the Indianapolis 500 is a dream team.Rick Mears, three 500 victories, six Indy pole position starts . . . A.J. Foyt, four 500 victories, four poles . . . Mario Andretti, one 500 victory, three poles.When Mears was asked yesterday after the final shakedown of his car if he is planning to move over and allow Foyt to lead the first lap, he quipped: "If I move over, it'll be to block." Then he added, "But starting next to A.J. in his last race is very special."
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | May 23, 1992
INDIANAPOLIS -- It is going to be the garage sale of all garage sales.A.J. Foyt announced yesterday that the general public will be allowed to get its hands on 35 years of his racing history, valued at an estimated $5 million.Included in the lot is Foyt's 1977 Coyote Indy-winning car, complete with Foyt Engine, in running condition."All this stuff is in the horse barns down in Houston," Foyt said. "There's so much of it, I just can't keep it all up. It's just going to waste sitting there, and I hate to see that, so I might as well share it with some people who are going to appreciate it."
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By SANDRA McKEE | April 27, 2003
Mario Andretti has been at this place before. It's the place where most people look at the world-renowned driver and ask the question: "Is he crazy or just foolish?" He was interrogated for months about his decision in 2000 to race at the 24-Hours of LeMans. He was only 60 years old then. Now, he is 63. Last week, at Indianapolis Motor Speedway, he tested one of the Indy Racing League cars owned by his son, Michael, who is planning to race his last Indianapolis 500 this May at age 40. Mario, who "retired" from Indy Car racing nine years ago, hit a piece of debris and took one of the most incredible rides of his career.
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By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2002
INDIANAPOLIS -- As the 86th Indianapolis 500 ended yesterday, two men crossed the finish line screaming. Paul Tracy, who at 33 has never won this race, could be heard on his team's radio yelling at the top of his lungs, "Yeeaahhhh, ba-by! Yeeeeeaaahhh!" Yards behind him, Helio Castroneves, 27, was also screeching at his crew, "He passed me under yellow! He passed me under yellow!" When Castroneves looked up, he saw the yellow and checkered flags waving over his head and began to cry in jubilation, little realizing that result was about to set off the biggest controversy over a race finish at the storied Indianapolis Motor Speedway since 1981.
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