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By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 17, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Mick Blackistone, executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland, has been laid off as a full-time lobbyist in yet another sign of the boating industry's foundering economic fortunes.Under an agreement with the association's executive board, the 44-year-old Annapolis resident will continue on a part-time basis and will retain the title of executive director, however.John Burgreen, owner of Annapolis Yacht Sales and the board's chairman, said that the association was simply unable to pay Mr. Blackistone's salary because of the economic downturn.
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SPORTS
By GILBERT LEWTHWAITE | September 7, 2000
When the state introduced the Maryland Clean Marina program in January 1999, it rejected the notion of mandatory compliance and opted for a voluntary approach. The assumption was that marina owners have more interest than most Marylanders in running enviromentally responsible businesses. Indeed, the 450-member Marine Trades Association of Maryland is a full partner in, and enthusiastic booster of, the Clean Marina initiative. In a state that enjoys the Atlantic, the Chesapeake Bay, and Deep Creek Lake, the wide distribution of water for pleasure and sport has fostered the creation of no fewer than 599 marinas.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | August 28, 1992
The chief lobbyist for Maryland's boating industry has left his post after 14 years to work as the director of state government relations for Chicago-based National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA).Mick Blackistone, who served as executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland, is taking over a post in which he is to monitor proposed legislation, regulations and taxes that affect boat manufacturers in 15 key boating states in his new job."I have worked closely with the NMMA for over a decade," Mr. Blackistone said in an interview.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1999
The China Sea Marine Trading Co. -- that grand emporium of serendipitous seagoing stuff on the Ann Street wharf -- is shipping out. And another slice of the Fells Point mystique slips away into the gathering gloom.Steve Bunker and Sharon Bondroff have been denizens of Fells Point so long you could imagine they sold Capt. William Fell his first sextant. They're simultaneously early pioneers of the new Fells Point and preservers of the old.Bunker's a familiar Fells Point character, professionally nautical in his somewhat piratical Vandyke beard and mustachio, longish hair, one earring and with a parrot or two perched on his shoulders.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | July 26, 1991
Fourteen years ago, Mick Blackistone and other boating enthusiasts set out to stop an avalanche of new regulations and taxes they feared would bury marine businesses.Rounding up support from boat dealers, sailmakers and marina operators, they revived the dormant Marine Trades Association of Maryland. Since then, the Annapolis-based group has increased its budget from $2,000 to about $150,000, peaked at 500members in the mid-1980s, pushed through 13 new laws to protect the industry and worked to stop others deemed harmful to boating business.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | December 9, 1991
An Annapolis-based marine trades group is preparing to fend off whatthe group views as further blows to a depressed industry during a tough upcoming legislative session.The Marine Trades Association ofMaryland has spent the past few months reorganizing to shore up declining membership and to rehire its former executive director and chief lobbyist.The group has retained Mick Blackistone, an Annapolis boating advocate who helped revive the association 14 years ago and who then became a driving force behind the group's lobbying efforts.
NEWS
June 3, 1991
Boating enthusiasts who hope to repeal a federal luxury tax on new boats have formed a non-affiliated political action committee, the first for the struggling industry.Mick Blackistone, director of the Annapolis-based Marine Trades Association of Maryland, has enlisted 30 state marine trades associations and boat manufacturers and dealersto help overturn a 10 percent tax on new boats costing more than $100,000.The tax, part of a five-year federal deficit-reduction package, already has cost the state jobs, businesses and income generated by sales and income tax, said Blackistone, the Save Jobs in Boating PAC's volunteer chairman.
NEWS
May 11, 1992
Busch wins honorsDel. Michael Busch has been named Legislator of the Year for 1992 by the Marine Trades Association of Maryland and the Anne Arundel Marine Trades Association.Busch, a second-term delegate and a member of the House Economic Matters Committee, was the sponsor of HB 1436, which allows for yacht salespeople to be independent contractors, rather than employees. The legislation was strongly endorsed by the Marine Trades and Yacht Brokers associations.He also serves as chairman of the Anne Arundel County Delegation and worked closely with the business community on the tax issues and state packages during the 1992 session.
NEWS
June 3, 1991
The Marine Trades Association of Maryland and the Anne Arundel Marine Trades Association are sponsoring a MTAM Golf Tournament beginning 10 a.m. June 3 at the Eisenhower Golf Course, Crownsville.A variety of prizes will be offered during the tournament, including a new powerboat for a hole-in-one and two round trip airline tickets to anywhere in the continental U.S. After a 10 a.m. registration, the golfing will begin at 11 a.m.Registration is $90 per golfer, $500 for corporate sponsorship, $200 for hole sponsorship, and tee or green sponsorship $125.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | January 28, 1993
Jack Neil has been paid to lobby on behalf of health and environmental interests, capital financing, state finance procurement and trade.Now, the Arnold resident has come to Annapolis to fight for something close to his own heart -- boating.It's no coincidence that the new lobbyist for Annapolis-based Marine Trades Association of Maryland is also an avid boater who owns a 22-foot catamaran and has crewed on trans-Atlantic voyages."I have a strong appreciation for the Chesapeake Bay and for the importance of boating," said Mr. Neil, who has run Jack Neil & Associates, a political and legislative consulting firm, since 1984.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1995
So much for the stereotype of the martini-sipping, sun-soaking, nap-seeking pleasure boaters.They are much more indulgent than that -- spending $1.01 billion annually, according to a University of Maryland study released today on the state recreational boating industry."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | April 6, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Former Marine Sgt. Clayton J. Lonetree, convicted six years ago in a famous sex-for-secrets spying case, may get his 25-year sentence reduced, but his guilty verdict will stand under an order by the Supreme Court yesterday.Without comment, the court refused to hear the ex-Marine's complaint that two U.S. intelligence agents duped him into confessing to espionage and his separate claim that he had a right to know the real identity of another agent who testified against him.Lonetree was 25 years old when a military jury found him guilty of several charges of spying and illegal disclosure of secrets to the Soviet KGB -- charges growing out of his activities while a guard at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow and later at the embassy in Vienna, Austria.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | January 28, 1993
Jack Neil has been paid to lobby on behalf of health and environmental interests, capital financing, state finance procurement and trade.Now, the Arnold resident has come to Annapolis to fight for something close to his own heart -- boating.It's no coincidence that the new lobbyist for Annapolis-based Marine Trades Association of Maryland is also an avid boater who owns a 22-foot catamaran and has crewed on trans-Atlantic voyages."I have a strong appreciation for the Chesapeake Bay and for the importance of boating," said Mr. Neil, who has run Jack Neil & Associates, a political and legislative consulting firm, since 1984.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | August 28, 1992
The chief lobbyist for Maryland's boating industry has left his post after 14 years to work as the director of state government relations for Chicago-based National Marine Manufacturers Association (NMMA).Mick Blackistone, who served as executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland, is taking over a post in which he is to monitor proposed legislation, regulations and taxes that affect boat manufacturers in 15 key boating states in his new job."I have worked closely with the NMMA for over a decade," Mr. Blackistone said in an interview.
NEWS
May 11, 1992
Busch wins honorsDel. Michael Busch has been named Legislator of the Year for 1992 by the Marine Trades Association of Maryland and the Anne Arundel Marine Trades Association.Busch, a second-term delegate and a member of the House Economic Matters Committee, was the sponsor of HB 1436, which allows for yacht salespeople to be independent contractors, rather than employees. The legislation was strongly endorsed by the Marine Trades and Yacht Brokers associations.He also serves as chairman of the Anne Arundel County Delegation and worked closely with the business community on the tax issues and state packages during the 1992 session.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | December 9, 1991
An Annapolis-based marine trades group is preparing to fend off whatthe group views as further blows to a depressed industry during a tough upcoming legislative session.The Marine Trades Association ofMaryland has spent the past few months reorganizing to shore up declining membership and to rehire its former executive director and chief lobbyist.The group has retained Mick Blackistone, an Annapolis boating advocate who helped revive the association 14 years ago and who then became a driving force behind the group's lobbying efforts.
NEWS
By Nancy Noyes | December 5, 1990
Many of us don't think too often about the health and well-being of the national and local marine industry that makes it possible for us to enjoy our time in boats.Over the past few weeks, however, it has become very clear that not only the marine industry but also boating consumers -- boat owners, especially -- are being singled out systematically to bear an increasing burden.By now, the new federal excise tax of 10 percent of the amount over $100,000 for boat purchases, and the graduated annual Coast Guard user fee ranging from $25 to $100 based on boat size are old news to most of us.Now, however, the state of Maryland is proposing to hit us again, both directly and indirectly.
BUSINESS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1995
So much for the stereotype of the martini-sipping, sun-soaking, nap-seeking pleasure boaters.They are much more indulgent than that -- spending $1.01 billion annually, according to a University of Maryland study released today on the state recreational boating industry."
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff writer | July 26, 1991
Fourteen years ago, Mick Blackistone and other boating enthusiasts set out to stop an avalanche of new regulations and taxes they feared would bury marine businesses.Rounding up support from boat dealers, sailmakers and marina operators, they revived the dormant Marine Trades Association of Maryland. Since then, the Annapolis-based group has increased its budget from $2,000 to about $150,000, peaked at 500members in the mid-1980s, pushed through 13 new laws to protect the industry and worked to stop others deemed harmful to boating business.
BUSINESS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 17, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Mick Blackistone, executive director of the Marine Trades Association of Maryland, has been laid off as a full-time lobbyist in yet another sign of the boating industry's foundering economic fortunes.Under an agreement with the association's executive board, the 44-year-old Annapolis resident will continue on a part-time basis and will retain the title of executive director, however.John Burgreen, owner of Annapolis Yacht Sales and the board's chairman, said that the association was simply unable to pay Mr. Blackistone's salary because of the economic downturn.
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