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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
State and federal officials announced Thursday a $2.2 million research effort aimed at preventing harm to whales and other marine mammals from building massive industrial wind turbines off Ocean City . The two-year study, to be led by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, will include using underwater microphones to record sounds of whales and other marine mammals in the ocean where the federal government is soliciting bids...
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
The Obama administration took a step closer Friday to allowing oil and gas exploration off the Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic coasts, drawing praise from the energy industry and criticism from environmentalists. The Interior Department's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management approved a framework for doing seismic testing from the Delaware Bay to mid-Florida and up to 400 miles offshore. The decision sets the stage for federal officials to begin issuing permits for surveying an area roughly the size of California.
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By Liz Bowie | December 4, 1991
The Chesapeake Bay has striped bass, sea nettles and blue crabs. But dolphins and whales?Whale watching may never become a local tourist attraction, but marine mammals have suddenly begun appearing in the bay and along the Atlantic Coast in numbers that appear to be larger than expected.The reason for this increase could be as simple as a telephone number. Within the past year, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the National Aquarium in Baltimore and the Smithsonian Institution have formed a network to keep track of marine mammals in the bay and along the Atlantic Coast.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
State and federal officials announced Thursday a $2.2 million research effort aimed at preventing harm to whales and other marine mammals from building massive industrial wind turbines off Ocean City . The two-year study, to be led by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, will include using underwater microphones to record sounds of whales and other marine mammals in the ocean where the federal government is soliciting bids...
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | December 14, 1990
Baltimore's National Aquarium is preparing its cast of dolphins and beluga whales for the Dec. 26 opening of the Marine Mammal Pavilion with a series of "dress rehearsal" performances of their educational show.Audiences invited to special rehearsals have included legislators, donors and, for yesterday's performance, dozens of newspaper, radio and television journalists whose reports the aquarium marketing staff hopes will prime the curiosity of a wider audience.For a week beginning today, thousands of aquarium members -- all invited to attend previews -- will fill the pavilion's "stadium," giving the employees, five dolphins and three beluga whales an idea of what to expect from the crowds anticipated after the official opening.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2004
It remains one of the great mysteries of marine science: Why do whales and other marine mammals strand themselves, swimming into shallow waters and washing ashore to die? Decades of research show that many of the strandings are caused by age-old maritime hazards: collisions with ships, infections from parasites, starvation and old age. But scientists have a new suspect these days: Navy sonar. Whales, dolphins and other marine mammals use echolocation - a kind of natural sonar -to detect predators, hunt for food, find mates, keep track of offspring and orient themselves in a dark and murky world.
NEWS
By Jean-Michel Cousteau | May 11, 1993
IN THE early days of our Cousteau explorations, guided more by curiosity than insight, we captured dolphins in the Mediterranean Sea for display and study at the oceanographic museum in Monte Carlo. We were fascinated by these quick, intelligent creatures, frequent fellow travelers riding the bow-waves of our expeditions.I was in high school at the time, and I remember rushing home in the afternoons to jump into the tank with one particular dolphin that I had befriended. At one point several weeks after the dolphin's capture, I began to suspect that something was going wrong.
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Tim Wheeler | July 12, 2013
Dolphin sightings off Maryland's Atlantic beaches have rebounded after a dismal tally last summer. Volunteers and staff of the National Aquarium spotted 113 of the marine mammals during their annual count Friday, up from just 31 seen this time last year.  They tallied sightings for three hours at four spots along the coast - at Assateague State Park's day use area and in Ocean City at 40th, 81st and 130th streets. Annual counts like Ocean City's provide marine mammal experts with snapshots of dolphin populations, as well as indications of reproduction rates and food abundance.  Aquarium staff attributed last year's lower than average count to factors such as the weather, bigger swells and food availability.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
Dolphins have evolved over millions of years to roam the oceans. These intelligent animals should not be confined to a concrete tank for our entertainment ( "National Aquarium's dolphin question at center of animal welfare debate," May 18). Children as well as the rest of us can be inspired and gain respect for nature by what is around us, such as ants, butterflies and birds. Baltimore could be so proud if our National Aquarium were to be the first major institution to release these marine mammals to an ocean-side sanctuary.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
The National Aquarium in Baltimore is asking for feedback as it considers whether to keep the eight Atlantic bottlenose dolphins in its care or move them to an ocean-side sanctuary. The Inner Harbor anchor institution revealed plans this week to evaluate its future role as a conservation organization - including whether to keep the marine mammals - through a process it's calling BLUEprint. The aquarium launched the website aqua.org/future for the public to submit opinions.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 27, 2014
Here are some words that appeared in this column in November 1990: "The National Aquarium and its promoters are out to lunch. They don't have a clue. Their facility is better called the National Anachronism. The new Marine Mammal Pavilion, featuring captured dolphins in a huge tank of water, does not belong to the times in which we are living. It belongs to the times from which we just emerged. It belongs to the age of P.T. Barnum. " That was my protest of the National Aquarium's $35 million investment in a big dolphin tank with an amphitheater so dolphins with cute names could perform up to six daily shows.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
Dolphins have evolved over millions of years to roam the oceans. These intelligent animals should not be confined to a concrete tank for our entertainment ( "National Aquarium's dolphin question at center of animal welfare debate," May 18). Children as well as the rest of us can be inspired and gain respect for nature by what is around us, such as ants, butterflies and birds. Baltimore could be so proud if our National Aquarium were to be the first major institution to release these marine mammals to an ocean-side sanctuary.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
If dolphins depart the National Aquarium, officials are contemplating what to do with the 1.2 million-gallon pool where the marine mammals have been on display for more than two decades. Among the possibilities: creating an underwater forest with swaying kelp seaweed stalks, leopard sharks and wolf eels, or a habitat that emulates the southern Pacific Ocean, where groupers and other marine life inhabit rusting fighter airplanes and other war wreckage. The fate of the $35 million Marine Mammal Pavilion, which opened in 1990 and takes up one-third of the aquarium's footprint, is one of many deliberations the National Aquarium has undertaken.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
The National Aquarium in Baltimore is asking for feedback as it considers whether to keep the eight Atlantic bottlenose dolphins in its care or move them to an ocean-side sanctuary. The Inner Harbor anchor institution revealed plans this week to evaluate its future role as a conservation organization - including whether to keep the marine mammals - through a process it's calling BLUEprint. The aquarium launched the website aqua.org/future for the public to submit opinions.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
The National Aquarium announced Wednesday that it is considering no longer having dolphins on exhibit, putting the popular Inner Harbor attraction at the forefront of a debate over whether keeping the animals in captivity is cruel. The aquarium is considering moving the eight mammals from the Dolphin Discovery amphitheater to an ocean-side sanctuary at an undetermined location. It has hired a team of consultants to examine the issue as part of a broader strategic assessment to ensure a "healthy future for the nonprofit institution and its animals.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 12, 2013
Dolphin sightings off Maryland's Atlantic beaches have rebounded after a dismal tally last summer. Volunteers and staff of the National Aquarium spotted 113 of the marine mammals during their annual count Friday, up from just 31 seen this time last year.  They tallied sightings for three hours at four spots along the coast - at Assateague State Park's day use area and in Ocean City at 40th, 81st and 130th streets. Annual counts like Ocean City's provide marine mammal experts with snapshots of dolphin populations, as well as indications of reproduction rates and food abundance.  Aquarium staff attributed last year's lower than average count to factors such as the weather, bigger swells and food availability.
NEWS
By Marilee Keefe | June 25, 1993
JEAN-MICHEL Cousteau ("Save the dolphin: Let it go free!", Other Voices, May 11) begins eloquently by pointing out that "contact with marine mammals is educational" and "observation helps us to understand and respect the animals, and engenders the will to protect them in the wild."These are the premises on which the zoos, oceanariums, aquariums and marine life parks are founded.A recent Roper poll shows that the American public is in near-unanimous agreement (92 percent) in its understanding that these facilities play an essential role in educating the public about marine mammals and the need for their conservation.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
If dolphins depart the National Aquarium, officials are contemplating what to do with the 1.2 million-gallon pool where the marine mammals have been on display for more than two decades. Among the possibilities: creating an underwater forest with swaying kelp seaweed stalks, leopard sharks and wolf eels, or a habitat that emulates the southern Pacific Ocean, where groupers and other marine life inhabit rusting fighter airplanes and other war wreckage. The fate of the $35 million Marine Mammal Pavilion, which opened in 1990 and takes up one-third of the aquarium's footprint, is one of many deliberations the National Aquarium has undertaken.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2012
The Obama administration's latest move to permit testing for oil and gas off Maryland and other Atlantic coast states is drawing flak from both environmentalists and the oil industry. Speaking at a lightly attended public hearing Wednesday afternoon in Annapolis, some residents said they feared the testing might hurt whales and dolphins, disrupt fishing and damage tourism. They also warned that the risks of a spill were too great to warrant even looking for oil. "Avoiding activities that will harm or kill any more marine mammals is significantly more important to me than succumbing to today's frenzied pressures to reduce gasoline prices by a mere 3 cents [er gallon]
EXPLORE
February 16, 2012
Regarding the recent Etc. column on birds: Editor: A bit more research into the topic of birds and brains would have made you appear a bit less of a bird brain yourself. The term bird brain perpetuates out of ignorance. If you look into the study of animal intellect, you will find that crows hold something in common with only three other species on this planet: multiple step problem solving using self made specialty tools. The only other species capable of this, that we know to date, are elephants, apes and humans.
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