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By Susan Hansen and Susan Hansen,Washington Bureau of The Sun | January 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Dissident members of a leading maritime industry union have scored a major electoral upset, seizing key leadership posts in a victory they said will help restore union democracy and protect a $1 billion Baltimore-based pension fund.Dissident candidates ousted more than a dozen top officials of the District 1 Marine Engineers Beneficial Association/National Maritime Union."People wanted a change," said Gordon Ward, a Timonium resident who will take over as chairman of the union's licensed division, which represents about 4,800 marine engineers and ships' officers nationwide.
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NEWS
By Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Aaron C. Dutton, who walked away from a scholarship at Morehouse University to join the United States Marine Corps at the age of 17, died from stroke complications on Aug. 25. The 40-year Baltimore resident was 74. Born Aaron Coleman Dutton in September 1939 and raised in New Orleans, he was the oldest of four children to Aaron Dutton, a teacher at Dillard University, and Annabelle, a principal at Gilbert Academy. In 1954 at the age of 15, Dutton won a statewide physics contest and then received a Ford Foundation Scholarship to Morehouse College.
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BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | September 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The heads of three major maritime unions have called on all segments of the maritime industry to work collectively to create a national program to save U.S.-flag shipping.Industry observers hailed the unprecedented joint statement Monday by the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots, the Seafarers International Union and a division of the National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association, as a potentially important step toward demonstrating the industry unity needed to prod Congress to enact new programs to revitalize U.S.-flag shipping.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 25, 2009
Michael Linkowich Sr., a retired ship's engineer who survived a German torpedo attack in the North Atlantic during World War II, died of lung disease Wednesday at Calvert Memorial Hospital in Prince Frederick. The Essex resident was 95. Born in Turners Station, he attended Baltimore County public schools and the old St. Mary's Industrial School until the eighth grade. As a young man, he worked for the old Essex Real Estate Co. and the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. He joined the merchant marine during World War II as an assistant engineer.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
Peter J. Ladzinski Sr., a retired maritime lawyer and former ship's engineer who was active in the affairs of the Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association, died of cancer Sunday at Fort Howard Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He was 80. A resident of Graceland Park for more than 50 years, Mr. Ladzinski led a varied life on both land and sea. Born on Lancaster Street and raised in Canton, he was a graduate of Holy Rosary School and later earned a GED certificate. After completing an internship at Spedden's Shipyard in Canton, he enrolled in the Merchant Marine Academy at King's Point, N.Y., and graduated in 1944.
NEWS
By Susan Hansen and Susan Hansen,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 25, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Baltimore-area union dissidents -- warning that a $1 billion pension fund may be in jeopardy -- are leading a rank-and file revolt against leaders of one of the nation's largest maritime unions.The dissidents charge that District One Marine Engineers BeneficialAssociation officials pilfered millions from union coffers after the union's 1988 merger with the National Maritime Union. And they allege that union officials in Washington are plotting a sellout of the Baltimore-based pension fund.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
The place where Ross Wilkinson works is always changing. The name differs from year to year, his colleagues vary from month to month, the location shifts constantly all over the globe. Wilkinson is a marine engineer, his office the greasy insides of a ship at sea."Things get stale if they don't change," said Wilkinson, a 43-year-old Seattle native who first went to sea when he was 20. "I like it this way."But change also is threatening to put Wilkinson out of a job. American shipboard labor is the most expensive in the world, and steamship lines continue to remove their vessels from the American fleet to hire foreign crews.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1999
CARDEROCK -- When an airliner crashes, investigators scour the wreckage for that scorched wire or mangled engine fragment that can explain what went wrong.Accidents at sea are different.Fifteen-hundred people have been lost since the 1970s on ships that have vanished at sea without a trace. "Why are ships sinking like this?" asked Philip A. Dent, a naval architect at the British Embassy.Dent is honorary chairman of a panel assembled by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME)
NEWS
By Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
Aaron C. Dutton, who walked away from a scholarship at Morehouse University to join the United States Marine Corps at the age of 17, died from stroke complications on Aug. 25. The 40-year Baltimore resident was 74. Born Aaron Coleman Dutton in September 1939 and raised in New Orleans, he was the oldest of four children to Aaron Dutton, a teacher at Dillard University, and Annabelle, a principal at Gilbert Academy. In 1954 at the age of 15, Dutton won a statewide physics contest and then received a Ford Foundation Scholarship to Morehouse College.
NEWS
January 3, 2004
George Zidik, a retired marine engineer and fan of Maryland thoroughbred racing, died Dec. 27 of cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Cockeysville resident was 74. Born in Lakewood, Ohio, he was a Lakewood High School graduate and was captain of the school's basketball team. He also ran track. Family members said he spoke six foreign languages: Polish, Russian, Italian, Hungarian, Spanish and French. He went to sea at age 15. He moved to Baltimore's Northwood neighborhood in 1952.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | September 20, 2007
Thomas Osman Jr., an American merchant marine engineer whose career on the high seas spanned more 30 years and three wars, died Sept. 13 of lung cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. The Baldwin resident was 84. Mr. Osman was born and raised in Quakertown, Pa., and after graduating from high school in 1940, went to work for Bethlehem Steel Corp. in Bethlehem, Pa. In 1942, Mr. Osman enrolled at the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, N.Y., and the next year he was a cadet aboard the Liberty ship Ward Hunt.
NEWS
August 9, 2004
Lance Cpl. Christopher E. Custer, a Marine combat engineer on leave from duty in Iraq, died after a car crash Aug. 1 near Williamsport, Pa. The former Bel Air resident was 21. A statement released by the Marine Corps said that Corporal Custer was due to serve out his enlistment in November. He was on three weeks' leave after having served with the 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion in Iraq. A military spokesman said Corporal Custer received about six ribbons and awards since he joined the Marines in 2000.
NEWS
January 3, 2004
George Zidik, a retired marine engineer and fan of Maryland thoroughbred racing, died Dec. 27 of cancer at the Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Cockeysville resident was 74. Born in Lakewood, Ohio, he was a Lakewood High School graduate and was captain of the school's basketball team. He also ran track. Family members said he spoke six foreign languages: Polish, Russian, Italian, Hungarian, Spanish and French. He went to sea at age 15. He moved to Baltimore's Northwood neighborhood in 1952.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
Peter J. Ladzinski Sr., a retired maritime lawyer and former ship's engineer who was active in the affairs of the Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association, died of cancer Sunday at Fort Howard Veterans Affairs Medical Center. He was 80. A resident of Graceland Park for more than 50 years, Mr. Ladzinski led a varied life on both land and sea. Born on Lancaster Street and raised in Canton, he was a graduate of Holy Rosary School and later earned a GED certificate. After completing an internship at Spedden's Shipyard in Canton, he enrolled in the Merchant Marine Academy at King's Point, N.Y., and graduated in 1944.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1999
CARDEROCK -- When an airliner crashes, investigators scour the wreckage for that scorched wire or mangled engine fragment that can explain what went wrong.Accidents at sea are different.Fifteen-hundred people have been lost since the 1970s on ships that have vanished at sea without a trace. "Why are ships sinking like this?" asked Philip A. Dent, a naval architect at the British Embassy.Dent is honorary chairman of a panel assembled by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME)
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
The place where Ross Wilkinson works is always changing. The name differs from year to year, his colleagues vary from month to month, the location shifts constantly all over the globe. Wilkinson is a marine engineer, his office the greasy insides of a ship at sea."Things get stale if they don't change," said Wilkinson, a 43-year-old Seattle native who first went to sea when he was 20. "I like it this way."But change also is threatening to put Wilkinson out of a job. American shipboard labor is the most expensive in the world, and steamship lines continue to remove their vessels from the American fleet to hire foreign crews.
NEWS
August 9, 2004
Lance Cpl. Christopher E. Custer, a Marine combat engineer on leave from duty in Iraq, died after a car crash Aug. 1 near Williamsport, Pa. The former Bel Air resident was 21. A statement released by the Marine Corps said that Corporal Custer was due to serve out his enlistment in November. He was on three weeks' leave after having served with the 2nd Combat Engineer Battalion in Iraq. A military spokesman said Corporal Custer received about six ribbons and awards since he joined the Marines in 2000.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | August 6, 1993
Alan R. Reid, a U.S. Navy marine engineer whose work included outfitting the hospital ship USNS Comfort, died yesterday of a brain tumor in Stella Maris Hospice in Cockeysville. He was 43.Mr. Reid, a Columbia resident for 21 years, worked 22 years as a civilian marine engineer, most of that time for the Military Sealift Command directing construction and re-fitting of military support ships. Since 1983, he had been director of the Ship Introduction Division at the command's headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | August 6, 1993
Alan R. Reid, a U.S. Navy marine engineer whose work included outfitting the hospital ship USNS Comfort, died yesterday of a brain tumor in Stella Maris Hospice in Cockeysville. He was 43.Mr. Reid, a Columbia resident for 21 years, worked 22 years as a civilian marine engineer, most of that time for the Military Sealift Command directing construction and re-fitting of military support ships. Since 1983, he had been director of the Ship Introduction Division at the command's headquarters at the Washington Navy Yard.
BUSINESS
By Journal of Commerce | September 11, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The heads of three major maritime unions have called on all segments of the maritime industry to work collectively to create a national program to save U.S.-flag shipping.Industry observers hailed the unprecedented joint statement Monday by the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots, the Seafarers International Union and a division of the National Marine Engineers Beneficial Association, as a potentially important step toward demonstrating the industry unity needed to prod Congress to enact new programs to revitalize U.S.-flag shipping.
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