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NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2012
When the Anne Arundel County Council began the process of selecting a candidate to fill a vacancy on the panel last month, they whittled the list of 10 applicants down to two. And then they got stuck. The council has been deadlocked in a 3-3 tie between two candidates: Peter I. Smith, a Defense Department budget manager and a Marine reservist from Severn who is African-American, and Michael J. Wagner, a former state senator from Ferndale, who is white. As the council prepares to take up the matter for the third time Monday, the two Democrats have sought to highlight their qualifications in the battle to replace Daryl D. Jones, who began serving a five-month federal prison term in January for failing to file nearly three dozen personal and business tax returns over six years.
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NEWS
January 12, 2012
The vile acts depicted in a video on the Internet this week - purportedly showing four U.S. Marines urinating on the corpses of three Taliban fighters - require condemnation in the strongest possible terms by U.S. and NATO officials. To do anything other than unequivocally repudiate such conduct would be self-defeating in a war that depends on maintaining the moral high ground against our enemies and the trust of the Afghan people. It would also hand our adversaries a massive propaganda victory.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2012
Thomas J. Kennedy Jr., who while fighting with the Marines in the South Pacific during World War II was blinded by enemy fire and after his return to Baltimore established Dawn's Office Supply, died Friday of cancer at his Mount Washington home. He was 86. Mr. Kennedy was born and raised on his family's Kingsville farm. Growing up, he developed a lifelong love of horses while helping his father on his horse-drawn milk wagon. In his youth, he worked as a Western Union messenger boy, exercised racehorses on a Monkton farm and was a Pep Boys stock clerk.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
Marc Firlie calls comparisons between football and warfare a cliche. But he says the challenges of playing football at the U.S. Naval Academy — on top of a full academic course load and year-round military training — really did help prepare him for his work on board a guided-missile cruiser helping to enforce the no-fly zones over Iraq after the 1991 Persian Gulf War. "You don't really appreciate it — or like it — when you're 17," says...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
Charles Leo Coyle, a retired advertising executive for the Hecht Co. and the News American who was a World War II dive bomber, died of kidney disease Sept. 23 at the Hospice House of Williamsburg, Va. He was 88 and had lived in Towson for many years. Born in Lynn, Mass., he graduated from Swampscott High School and was an accomplished skier, ice skater and swimmer. He was nicknamed "Dory" because he was a skilled boatsman. He remained a skier and ice skater and enjoyed trips to the Northwest Ice Rink and Ski Liberty.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 15, 2011
Raymond J. Garber, a retired retail salesman who served in the Marine Corps during World War II, died Sept. 7 of multiple organ failure at Harbor Hospital. The Glen Burnie resident was 87. The son of a baker and a homemaker, Raymond Joseph Garber was born and raised in Catonsville. He was a 1942 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington. After high school, he joined the Marine Corps and served with the 1st Marine Division. He fought in the Guadalcanal, Okinawa and Northern China campaigns, and was in China when the war ended.
FEATURES
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2011
Terry Mahoney, a lifelong hiker and a bit of a military historian, will spend Flag Day this year trekking 18 miles past the sites that played roles in the Battle of Baltimore nearly 200 years ago. The 41-year-old veteran, who served six years in the Marine Corps, is walking to raise awareness and funds for severely injured veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. All pledges to his effort will go to Sentinels of Freedom, a California-based organization that helps veterans who have survived devastating injuries get on the road to recovery.
NEWS
March 5, 2011
Touch a screen at the new Fort McHenry Visitor and Education Center and the sounds of "The Star- Spangled Banner," eight different versions, spring forth. Some feature singers who belt out the words, "the land of the free. " Others are instrumentals, some jazzy, some martial, and two more are waiting in the wings. To make it to Fort McHenry, these performances had to be serious and timely. "We ruled out any goofy versions," said Fort Superintendent Gay Vietzke, "or ones where the artists were simply seeking publicity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2010
For 90 minutes in the intimate space of the Head Theater at Center Stage , audiences are being thrust uncomfortably into an issue that many Americans ignore or choose to forget, or deal with simply by displaying a "Support Our Troops" sticker. Welcome to "ReEntry," a play by Emily Ackerman and KJ Sanchez, who drew the dialogue from interviews they conducted with Marines and their families. The result is a grittily, sometimes bitterly effective theatrical vehicle about our two long-lasting wars and those who come back from fighting them.
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