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SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | October 19, 1993
Reading Time: Two Minutes.A fitting preliminary to the 18th Marine Corps Marathon, which will be conducted over the streets of downtown Washington Sunday (9 a.m.), was this past weekend's Army 10-miler in D.C. (talk about service cooperation). Mexico is on a winning streak, Carlos Rivas and Rene Guerraro having prevailed in the last two Marine runs while the defending champ among the women's side of a race that annually draws about 13,000 entries is Judy Mercon of Florida. The Army race, won by Jim Hage in 50:37, drew 7,500 entrants, making it the largest 10-miler in the United States.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2001
WASHINGTON - In its final report on the crash of a V-22 Osprey last December, the Marine Corps said yesterday that malfunctioning software caused the aircraft to swerve wildly out of control before plummeting to the ground and bursting into flames, killing all four Marines on board. The report recommended a battery of new tests, improved inspection regimens and the redesign of the problem-plagued aircraft's hydraulic system before the $40 billion Osprey program would be allowed to proceed.
NEWS
March 9, 1999
THE U.S. air base at Aviano in northern Italy is essential to U.S. policy in the former Yugoslavia and to NATO. But if its planes kill people on training flights and maim the local economy, and if that is nobody's fault, Italy will not long tolerate this situation.Whether just or unjust, the acquittal last week of Capt. Richard Ashby by a Marine Corps court martial for manslaughter in the deaths of 20 skiers at an Italian ski resort is a disaster for U.S. foreign and military policy.It is an affront to Italy, where officials wanted to try the pilot and navigator under Italian law, and delivers a juicy campaign issue to its powerful, reconstituted Communist Party.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
Vietnam veteran Gerald W. Elliott had waited 40 years for this moment, and he wasn't about to let Tropical Storm Hanna keep him away from the military ceremony at which he was to be decorated with two Purple Hearts. Elliott, 61, a Salisbury resident, accompanied by his wife of 39 years, a daughter and a granddaughter, arrived shortly before the 11 a.m. ceremony yesterday at the Marine Corps Reserve Center in Northeast Baltimore. Originally scheduled outdoors, it was moved because of the foul weather to a large gymnasium that was filled with Marines, some 50 of whom were in military formation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 28, 1999
LITTLETON, Colo. -- An 18-year-old woman who attended the senior prom with one of the killers at Columbine High School bought at least two of the firearms used in the attack, authorities confirmed yesterday as they announced that 51 pipe bombs -- nearly twice as many as first mentioned -- had been found.The woman, Robyn Anderson, who did not respond to requests for comment, was interviewed by the police Monday and released.She bought two shotguns at a local gun show she attended recently with the two gunmen, Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, her prom date, and is being considered a witness, not a suspect.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2010
When Chris Vaile was severely wounded by an improvised explosive device in January 2008, the Marine Corps sergeant refused to leave his squad in Iraq. It was his final tour. The wound permanently left shrapnel in his foot and earned him a Purple Heart, but he would not leave. "He was fearless and full of adventure," Cara Vaile said of her son. Chris Jarrod Vaile, 25, a Randallstown native, was killed Sunday by an IED in Afghanistan, where he was working for a private security firm.
FEATURES
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 28, 1997
ARLINGTON, Va. -- They slowly emerge from behind the Marine Corps shrine like an apparition, four platoons in dress blues, turning sharply to echoing, guttural commands.One platoon splits off and marches toward the crowd, their bayoneted rifles set at a 45-degree angle. There are no commands. The muggy night air is pierced only by sharp metallic "chunks" -- the slap of gloved hands against weapons.They mechanically weave into intricate patterns, twirling their 10 1/2 -pound rifles with the swiftness of a baton.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 22, 1997
They troop around Lake Montebello in the fading autumn light, a misery squad of pumping arms and legs. A Marine sergeant, brawny as an action figure, is hard on their tail."
SPORTS
By Michael Reeb and Michael Reeb,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2001
Like everyone else in Saturday's Comcast Baltimore Marathon, Mary Spinoso will be on new footing for the inaugural running of the race. Spinoso, a 40-year-old massage therapist from Baltimore, has run three Marine Corps marathons, but will be running her first outside Washington. Thanks to the help of the NCR Trail Snails, a loosely formed running group that trains on the converted railroad trail in northern Baltimore County, she figures to be ready. "It's a group that takes in runners of all shapes and sizes.
NEWS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1997
Riddick Bowe's lifelong dream of being a U.S. Marine lasted all of 11 days before he tossed in the towel.The former heavyweight boxing champion was granted permission yesterday to be released from boot camp in Parris Island, S.C.There was a time when Bowe, 29, was considered the world's toughest man. But he apparently found it too difficult to adjust to the rigors of military life after years of experiencing the adulation, luxuries and sweet life of a...
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