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Marine Biotechnology

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By Blair S. Walker | October 15, 1991
Baltimore is pushing to become a more active player in marine biotechnology, an exotic-sounding field that three local companies believe will satisfy a rather commonplace goal -- making money.Yesterday, the chief executives of Martek Corp., Adheron Corp. and Biotrax Inc. converged on the International Marine Biotechnology Conference being held at the Stouffer Harborplace Hotel in downtown Baltimore through tomorrow.Roughly 100 people attended the gathering, which is taking place at a time when the city's business leaders are striving for a local economy anchored by life sciences businesses.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2010
A technique developed by University of Maryland scientists for cultivating seafood indoors is slated to get its first real-world tryout under a licensing agreement with a newly formed Baltimore company. The technique, in which fish destined for the dinner table are bred in captivity and raised in large tanks of artificial sea water, has been licensed to a biotechnology startup called Maryland Sustainable Mariculture, University System of Maryland officials say. It's a watershed for Yonathan Zohar and his team of scientists and technicians, who've been working for years to perfect their "recirculating marine aquaculture system" in the Columbus Center at the Inner Harbor.
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NEWS
January 1, 1995
In Thursday's editions, an article about Dr. Robert C. Gallo, one of the world's leading AIDS researchers, misstated the relationship between the new Columbus Center and the University of Maryland. The Columbus Center is owned and operated by Columbus Center Development Inc., a private, non-profit organization. When Columbus Center opens, it will house the relocated Center of Marine Biotechnology, which is part of the university.The Sun regrets the errors.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
Yonathan Zohar beams like a proud parent as he cradles the freshly netted fish in his hands. He didn't catch this glistening branzini. He raised it - and thousands more - in large fiberglass tanks at the Columbus Center at the Inner Harbor. "This is a happy moment here," says Zohar, director of the Center of Marine Biotechnology at the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute. "Green fish, as good as it gets. Clean, environmentally friendly, sushi-quality fish, delivered to the restaurant a few hours after harvesting."
NEWS
May 1, 1997
THE HALL OF Exploration at the Columbus Center opens Saturday, culminating the $160 million Inner Harbor marine biotechnology facility's decade-long journey from conception to completion. If projections prove correct, 400,000 visitors a year will see its interactive exhibits and do hands-on experimentation in its living labs."Marine biotechnology is not the simplest thing in the world to understand. We are challenging people to kind of shake up their senses," says Stanley Heuisler, the non-profit center's president.
NEWS
November 4, 1991
One way to assure Baltimore's future prosperity is to build on its strengths, and the "life sciences" -- a term encompassing everything from traditional medical research to the cutting-edge work in marine biotechnology that will be a staple of the new Christopher Columbus Center -- clearly qualifies as a regional specialty. So we welcome the news that plans for a medical trade mart and conference center have received the support of the Maryland Stadium Authority for use of part of the 85-acre Camden Yards sports complex.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
A Baltimore Circuit judge approved the sale yesterday of the financially insolvent Columbus Center in Baltimore's Inner Harbor to the University System of Maryland for $650,000.Approving the deal in a brief two-page order, Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan overruled an objection to the sale filed by J. Stanley Heuisler, the former head of the marine biotechnology facility, who complained in court papers that the purchase price was too low.John Lippincott, associate vice chancellor of the university, said he was pleased by the decision.
NEWS
October 14, 1991
Amid all the gloom and doom haunting the state's finances, yesterday's dedication of the Christopher Columbus Center of Marine Research and Exploration was a welcome opportunity to look toward an exciting future. Soon to rise on Piers 5 and 6 at the Inner Harbor, the $164 million center is designed to maintain this country's leadership in marine biotechnology. It also promises enormous economic and educational benefits to the region.Research in marine biotechnology is crucial in a number of areas.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
The Columbus Center's name will change and vacant offices there will be leased to nonprofit groups, but most aspects of the marine biotechnology institute at Baltimore's Inner Harbor will remain the same.That was the assessment yesterday of the top official of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute after this week's agreement by the university system to purchase the financially troubled facility."It won't be called the Columbus Center," said Peter P. McCann, interim president of the institute, which would operate the building.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1998
A report commissioned by two General Assembly committees on the debt-laden and partly empty Columbus Center suggests uses ranging from a museum school for schoolchildren to an outreach center dealing with ports and other urban waterways.In a hearing scheduled for today, the House Committee on Appropriations and the Senate Committee on Budget and Taxation will discuss the report, which was drafted by the state Department of Business and Economic Development, the University System of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2001
The future of Chesapeake Bay's blue crab industry could be taking shape in huge blue tanks and tiny petri dishes in a laboratory at the Inner Harbor, where University of Maryland researchers are creating a science around the crab's life cycle. They hope to use what they learn in the basement of the Center of Marine Biotechnology to re-stock the bay with hatchery-grown juvenile crabs. "We're using the tools of biotechnology to study and better understand the fundamental process of the blue crab life cycles," says Yohnathan Zohar, director of the Center of Marine Biotechnology.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | December 20, 2000
Tourism officials are looking into renovating the failed Hall of Exploration at the Columbus Center for use as Baltimore's visitors center at the suggestion of the mayor and a University of Maryland official. "We are exploring from a feasibility standpoint how we can convert that space into a functioning visitors center and maintain the important programming elements we need," said Carroll R. Armstrong, president and chief executive officer of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | July 17, 1999
There's something lurking in Baltimore Harbor mud that seems to be chewing up the toxic PCBs left there by decades of industrial activity. If scientists can figure out what's going on, they might find ways to unleash the microbes on tainted waterways across the country.Kevin Sowers, a microbiologist at the University of Maryland's Center of Marine Biotechnology (COMB) has been pulling muck from the harbor slips around his laboratory at the Columbus Center, cultivating the microbes that live in it, and watching them slice up the PCB molecules.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1999
A Baltimore Circuit judge approved the sale yesterday of the financially insolvent Columbus Center in Baltimore's Inner Harbor to the University System of Maryland for $650,000.Approving the deal in a brief two-page order, Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan overruled an objection to the sale filed by J. Stanley Heuisler, the former head of the marine biotechnology facility, who complained in court papers that the purchase price was too low.John Lippincott, associate vice chancellor of the university, said he was pleased by the decision.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1998
The former head of the Columbus Center is criticizing the sale of the financially insolvent marine biotechnology facility in Baltimore's Inner Harbor to the University System of Maryland, calling the $650,000 purchase price a "relatively minuscule contribution."In a formal legal objection to the sale, J. Stanley Heuisler, the founding board chairman and former chief executive officer of the nonprofit corporation created to set up and run the center, complained that the price would allow the university system to assume ownership of the facility for less than 1 percent of its value.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1998
The Columbus Center's Hall of Exploration was packed yesterday -- not with people wanting to see its exhibits, which have been closed for nearly a year, but with bargain-hunters looking to buy them at a discount.The occasion was the public auction of assets of the insolvent Columbus Center Development Corp., the former nonprofit manager of the marine biotechnology facility in Baltimore's Inner Harbor that said in June it could not pay off its debts.About $140,000 was raised yesterday to pay off creditors of the Columbus Center, which a court-appointed receiver last week agreed to sell to the University System of Maryland.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1998
The Columbus Center's Hall of Exploration was packed yesterday -- not with people wanting to see its exhibits, which have been closed for nearly a year, but with bargain-hunters looking to buy them at a discount.The occasion was the public auction of assets of the insolvent Columbus Center Development Corp., the former nonprofit manager of the marine biotechnology facility in Baltimore's Inner Harbor that said in June it could not pay off its debts.About $140,000 was raised yesterday to pay off creditors of the Columbus Center, which a court-appointed receiver last week agreed to sell to the University System of Maryland.
NEWS
October 13, 1992
A few minutes before hefting a shovelful of dirt yesterday as part of the ground breaking ceremony for the new Christopher Columbus Center in the Inner Harbor, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke swept his gaze from the towers of Harborplace to the towers of the Lafayette housing projects and metaphorically connected the dots for his audience:"We are making a magnificent investment in the future of Baltimore," he said. "This project represents a broadening of opportunities that will include everyone in Baltimore City.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1998
The Columbus Center's name will change and vacant offices there will be leased to nonprofit groups, but most aspects of the marine biotechnology institute at Baltimore's Inner Harbor will remain the same.That was the assessment yesterday of the top official of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute after this week's agreement by the university system to purchase the financially troubled facility."It won't be called the Columbus Center," said Peter P. McCann, interim president of the institute, which would operate the building.
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