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NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,sun reporter | November 17, 2006
Breckinridge L. Willcox, a retired Washington lawyer who served as Maryland's top federal prosecutor from 1986 to 1991, died yesterday morning at his wife's ranch in southern California after a battle with cancer. The Bethesda resident was 62. Former colleagues praised Mr. Willcox for his transformative impact on the U.S. attorney's office headquartered in Baltimore. They noted his creation of a cadre of career prosecutors inside the office while roughly doubling the size of his staff and extending its reach into the prosecution of savings-and-loan institutions as well as large-scale illegal drug organizations.
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NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
Ari'Yonna Vrathwaite thought she would be a music producer when she grew up, until she started attending a program at the National Aquarium this week. Now, the program that gets students involved in research about the Chesapeake Bay watershed has given Ari'Yonna something to think about: marine biology as a career. "I really like it and I want to come back here again," she said. "We have fun. " Ari'Yonna, 13 and a rising eighth-grader at Commodore John Rogers School in Baltimore, said that so far she liked testing the oxygen level in the water the most.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
J. Pierce Fenhagen, a retired newspaper copy editor and editorial writer, died of heart failure Monday at his Wakefield, R.I., home. He was 84. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Fenhagen was the son of George Corner Fenhagen, a partner in the architectural firm of Buckler & Fenhagen, which designed the library at the Johns Hopkins University and the present City College. Mr. Fenhagen was raised in the 900 block of St. Paul St. and graduated from St. Andrew's School in Middletown, Del. He earned his bachelor's degree from Haverford College in 1939.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | April 11, 2012
Greg Street took an unusual path to being one of the lead developers on the most massive video game in history. The McDaniel College graduate returns to his alma mater on April 30 in a free event open to the public called "SmartTALK," where Street will speak about how his liberal arts education prepared him for his current role as "World of Warcraft's" lead systems designer. We caught up with Greg to discuss his path to Blizzard and his role in engaging with the huge community of fans "World of Warcraft" has. Look out for Part 2 of our talk tomorrow.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
On an isolated island off the coast of California, Ranjit Korah is learning hands-on about marine biology and ecosystems. Korah, of Bel Air, a ninth-grader at Fallston High School, was selected from thousands of students to participate in the international science expedition to California's Channel Islands through Saturday. The Jason Foundation, a multidisciplinary educational organization, controls the Jason Project. Korah is one of 28 students on the "Jason XIV: From Shore to Sea" expedition, working one-on-one with researchers, teachers and students from around the world, said project coordinator Daniel Beaupre.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 6, 2011
George Samuel Alspach Jr., who taught marine biology at what is now McDaniel College for four decades, died June 30 of complications from pneumonia at Carroll Hospital Center. The longtime Taylorsville resident was 71. The son of an insurance company manager and a homemaker, Dr. Alspach was born in Newton, Mass., and raised in Longmeadow, Mass., near Springfield. After graduation from Longmeadow High School, he attended Boston University and earned his bachelor's degree in 1963 in biology from Antioch College.
NEWS
By P.J. Wingate | January 28, 1992
BEFORE the new year pushes 1991 far into the mists, all Marylanders should pause and give thanks for two centenarians of the Chesapeake -- Mrs. W. Alton Jones and Dr. Reginald van Trump Truitt. Both of them served the land of pleasant living long and well, and both of them said their final goodbyes in 1991 at age 100.Dr. Truitt, Maryland's earliest pioneer in the study of marine biology and ecology, concentrated on the Chesapeake Bay, while Mrs. Jones gave most of her attention to the land around the bay, particularly Talbot County and the upper Eastern Shore.
NEWS
March 12, 1992
When plans for the Christopher Columbus Center of Marine Research and Exploration were made public this week, the dramatic ribbed roof reminded some observers of a sea creature. But the design is no more dramatic than the dream behind this project -- or its importance for Baltimore.In part because of the pioneering efforts of the University of Maryland's Rita Colwell, the United States enjoys a lead in marine biotechnology, a field with enormous economic development potential. Dr. Colwell heads the Maryland Biotechnology Institute, which includes the Center of Marine Biology (COMB)
NEWS
December 27, 2003
Dennis A. Powers, 65, a former director of Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station, died Dec. 8 after a long illness in New Smyrna Beach, Fla. Dr. Powers headed the Pacific Grove, Calif.-based facility from 1988 to 2000 and was the Harold A. Miller Professor of Biological Sciences at Stanford. "Dennis Powers was a creative force who was instrumental in catalyzing the development of the fields of integrative biology and adaptational biochemistry," Stanford biological sciences Professor George N. Somero, director of Hopkins Marine Station since 2000, said in a statement released by Hopkins.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
In 1940, not only the screen was square. So was America.Thus it's something of an astonishment to discover what degree of savvy lurks in the 50-year-old and newly restored "Pinocchio."This wonderful little movie seems as prescient as "Network" in some of its acute observations about the ways of youth.The leading man may be a trifle wooden, and he may be lost in some painterly Mitteleuropean version of an Italian alpine village as envisioned by nine old white men in an air-conditioned studio in Burbank, Calif.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 6, 2011
George Samuel Alspach Jr., who taught marine biology at what is now McDaniel College for four decades, died June 30 of complications from pneumonia at Carroll Hospital Center. The longtime Taylorsville resident was 71. The son of an insurance company manager and a homemaker, Dr. Alspach was born in Newton, Mass., and raised in Longmeadow, Mass., near Springfield. After graduation from Longmeadow High School, he attended Boston University and earned his bachelor's degree in 1963 in biology from Antioch College.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,sun reporter | November 17, 2006
Breckinridge L. Willcox, a retired Washington lawyer who served as Maryland's top federal prosecutor from 1986 to 1991, died yesterday morning at his wife's ranch in southern California after a battle with cancer. The Bethesda resident was 62. Former colleagues praised Mr. Willcox for his transformative impact on the U.S. attorney's office headquartered in Baltimore. They noted his creation of a cadre of career prosecutors inside the office while roughly doubling the size of his staff and extending its reach into the prosecution of savings-and-loan institutions as well as large-scale illegal drug organizations.
NEWS
December 27, 2003
Dennis A. Powers, 65, a former director of Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station, died Dec. 8 after a long illness in New Smyrna Beach, Fla. Dr. Powers headed the Pacific Grove, Calif.-based facility from 1988 to 2000 and was the Harold A. Miller Professor of Biological Sciences at Stanford. "Dennis Powers was a creative force who was instrumental in catalyzing the development of the fields of integrative biology and adaptational biochemistry," Stanford biological sciences Professor George N. Somero, director of Hopkins Marine Station since 2000, said in a statement released by Hopkins.
NEWS
By Jennifer Blenner and Jennifer Blenner,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2003
On an isolated island off the coast of California, Ranjit Korah is learning hands-on about marine biology and ecosystems. Korah, of Bel Air, a ninth-grader at Fallston High School, was selected from thousands of students to participate in the international science expedition to California's Channel Islands through Saturday. The Jason Foundation, a multidisciplinary educational organization, controls the Jason Project. Korah is one of 28 students on the "Jason XIV: From Shore to Sea" expedition, working one-on-one with researchers, teachers and students from around the world, said project coordinator Daniel Beaupre.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2002
J. Pierce Fenhagen, a retired newspaper copy editor and editorial writer, died of heart failure Monday at his Wakefield, R.I., home. He was 84. Born and raised in Baltimore, Mr. Fenhagen was the son of George Corner Fenhagen, a partner in the architectural firm of Buckler & Fenhagen, which designed the library at the Johns Hopkins University and the present City College. Mr. Fenhagen was raised in the 900 block of St. Paul St. and graduated from St. Andrew's School in Middletown, Del. He earned his bachelor's degree from Haverford College in 1939.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
In 1940, not only the screen was square. So was America.Thus it's something of an astonishment to discover what degree of savvy lurks in the 50-year-old and newly restored "Pinocchio."This wonderful little movie seems as prescient as "Network" in some of its acute observations about the ways of youth.The leading man may be a trifle wooden, and he may be lost in some painterly Mitteleuropean version of an Italian alpine village as envisioned by nine old white men in an air-conditioned studio in Burbank, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
In 1940, not only the screen was square. So was America.Thus it's something of an astonishment to discover what degree of savvy lurks in the more than 50-year-old and newly-restored "Pinocchio."This wonderful little movie seems as prescient as "Network" in some of its acute observations about the ways of youth. The leading man may be a trifle wooden and he may be lost in some painterly Mitteleuropean version of an Italian alpine village as envisioned by nine old white men in an air-conditioned studio in Burbank, California, the year before Pearl Harbor, but the temptations he fell prey to are as vivid as today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | June 26, 1992
In 1940, not only the screen was square. So was America.Thus it's something of an astonishment to discover what degree of savvy lurks in the more than 50-year-old and newly-restored "Pinocchio."This wonderful little movie seems as prescient as "Network" in some of its acute observations about the ways of youth. The leading man may be a trifle wooden and he may be lost in some painterly Mitteleuropean version of an Italian alpine village as envisioned by nine old white men in an air-conditioned studio in Burbank, California, the year before Pearl Harbor, but the temptations he fell prey to are as vivid as today.
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