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NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
A new poll commissioned in part by the American Civil Liberties Union found growing support in Maryland for both decriminalizing marijuana and legalizing it outright. Two-thirds of residents surveyed supported eliminating jail time for marijuana possession, and a majority backed allowing Maryland to regulate and tax pot like alcohol. Commissioned by the ACLU and the Marijuana Policy Project, the survey's findings mirror national attitudes about legalizing the drug. In April, a national poll released by the Pew Research Center found that for the first time in four decades, a majority of Americans supported legalizing marijuana.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
With Maryland's proposed licensing fees for growing and selling medical marijuana among the highest in the nation, some advocates warn that the steep costs could drive off applicants, crippling the nascent program and limiting access to treatment for tens of thousands of state residents. Prospective medical marijuana growers would have to pay $125,000 a year for a two-year license, while dispensaries would have to pay $40,000 a year, according to the recommendations of a state commission.
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NEWS
February 4, 2010
It is downright disturbing to see that Mike Gimbel, someone who has worked in substance abuse programs, could express such a shockingly callous and ignorant view of medical marijuana dispensaries and drug treatment centers by implying that they would have a negative effect on "our communities, especially our children." ("Md. wouldn't be able to control marijuana dispensaries," Readers respond, Feb. 4). As Mr. Gimbel himself should know, such establishments exist in order to provide reprieve and care for afflicted members of our community.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The General Assembly moved Saturday to dramatically change Maryland's drug laws as the House of Delegates joined the Senate in voting to make possession of small amounts of marijuana a civil offense punishable only by a fine. The House voted 78-55 to approve a measure substantially similar to the decriminalization bill overwhelmingly passed by the Senate last month. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said his chamber would agree to the House's relatively minor changes and send the bill to Gov. Martin O'Malley.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2001
The champion of legislation that would make medical uses of marijuana legal in Maryland says he is undeterred by a Supreme Court ruling yesterday that federal law prohibits such a use. Del. Donald E. Murphy, a Catonsville Republican, plans to be outside The Mall in Columbia this morning, waving signs at a rally supporting medical marijuana. Murphy has sponsored two medical marijuana bills named after Darrell Putman, a former Green Beret and Howard County farmer who died of cancer, Today's rally is the first of three scheduled this week in Columbia, Frederick and Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Legislation that would decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana hit friction in a key committee Thursday afternoon. The proposal to give only a fine - and not jail time - to people caught with less than 10 grams of pot passed the Senate earlier this month with bi-partisan support. On Thursday, lawmakers on the House Judiciary Committee intensely questioned whether the measure went too far. Del. Luiz Simmons pointed out the committee supported the limited medical marijuana plan , currently advancing in the Senate, that involves academic research.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
Michael Phelps' life has calmed down somewhat in the past few days. He isn't waking up to people shouting outside his apartment, and the paparazzi, for the most part, have stopped tailing him. But Phelps still isn't ready to commit to swimming in the 2012 Olympics. The Rodgers Forge native, 23, says it's something he continues to mull. "It will take a few months," Phelps said. "I'll give it 30 or 60 days. I think it will be better. I'm already happier now than I was, just having some part of my life back to normal, being able to swim again, having fun, joking around."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 30, 2002
WASHINGTON - A federal judge here has overturned a law prohibiting residents of the city from circulating or voting on a ballot initiative to legalize marijuana for medical purposes. As a result, a measure to legalize the cultivation, possession, use and distribution of marijuana for seriously ill patients whose doctors recommend it can be put on the ballot as early as November. The judge, Emmet G. Sullivan of U.S. District Court, ruled Thursday that the law barring circulation of the initiative was unconstitutional.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Kudos to Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Joseph T. Jones Jr. for articulating the need for a more sensible marijuana policy in Maryland ( "Building safe and just communities," March 3). Saddling people with criminal records for possessing marijuana causes far more problems than the use of marijuana itself. The authors correctly note that replacing criminal penalties for marijuana possession with a civil fine "does not mean [they'll] stop going after the real dangers in our community - the distributors, the dealers and violent criminals who do real harm in our neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
As the Maryland Senate voted Tuesday to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, advocates for legalizing the drug saw an opening move in a multiyear effort to make it completely legal. "I think the taboo has been lifted on talking about marijuana in Maryland," said Del. Curt Anderson, a Baltimore Democrat who introduced a separate bill that would legalize marijuana, regulate it, and tax it like alcohol. He said he doesn't expect it to pass this year. "All we want to do is start the conversation," Anderson said.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Kudos to Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Joseph T. Jones Jr. for articulating the need for a more sensible marijuana policy in Maryland ( "Building safe and just communities," March 3). Saddling people with criminal records for possessing marijuana causes far more problems than the use of marijuana itself. The authors correctly note that replacing criminal penalties for marijuana possession with a civil fine "does not mean [they'll] stop going after the real dangers in our community - the distributors, the dealers and violent criminals who do real harm in our neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
A new poll commissioned in part by the American Civil Liberties Union found growing support in Maryland for both decriminalizing marijuana and legalizing it outright. Two-thirds of residents surveyed supported eliminating jail time for marijuana possession, and a majority backed allowing Maryland to regulate and tax pot like alcohol. Commissioned by the ACLU and the Marijuana Policy Project, the survey's findings mirror national attitudes about legalizing the drug. In April, a national poll released by the Pew Research Center found that for the first time in four decades, a majority of Americans supported legalizing marijuana.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
The General Assembly is poised to pass legislation that would make Maryland the 19th state to legalize marijuana use for medical reasons - though how quickly the state's cancer patients and others might benefit remains in question. The state Senate gave the legislation preliminary approval Friday evening without debate. The bill, which has passed the House, would allow the legal distribution of marijuana by doctors and nurses through academic medical centers. A commission would be set up to spell out the terms under which it would be grown and dispensed.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2013
Legislation that would decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana hit friction in a key committee Thursday afternoon. The proposal to give only a fine - and not jail time - to people caught with less than 10 grams of pot passed the Senate earlier this month with bi-partisan support. On Thursday, lawmakers on the House Judiciary Committee intensely questioned whether the measure went too far. Del. Luiz Simmons pointed out the committee supported the limited medical marijuana plan , currently advancing in the Senate, that involves academic research.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
As the Maryland Senate voted Tuesday to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, advocates for legalizing the drug saw an opening move in a multiyear effort to make it completely legal. "I think the taboo has been lifted on talking about marijuana in Maryland," said Del. Curt Anderson, a Baltimore Democrat who introduced a separate bill that would legalize marijuana, regulate it, and tax it like alcohol. He said he doesn't expect it to pass this year. "All we want to do is start the conversation," Anderson said.
NEWS
February 4, 2010
It is downright disturbing to see that Mike Gimbel, someone who has worked in substance abuse programs, could express such a shockingly callous and ignorant view of medical marijuana dispensaries and drug treatment centers by implying that they would have a negative effect on "our communities, especially our children." ("Md. wouldn't be able to control marijuana dispensaries," Readers respond, Feb. 4). As Mr. Gimbel himself should know, such establishments exist in order to provide reprieve and care for afflicted members of our community.
NEWS
May 15, 2003
Evidence shows that marijuana can be medicine If Jeffrey A. Schaler wants to legalize every drug for everybody, he certainly has a right to that opinion ("Decision to smoke pot shouldn't involve doctor," Opinion Commentary, May 12). But it is odd to see him join forces with arch-prohibitionists in demonizing and distorting the views of medical marijuana advocates. And the Marijuana Policy Project - which led the fight for the medical marijuana bill awaiting Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s signature - does not "argue that marijuana is a panacea."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
The General Assembly is poised to pass legislation that would make Maryland the 19th state to legalize marijuana use for medical reasons - though how quickly the state's cancer patients and others might benefit remains in question. The state Senate gave the legislation preliminary approval Friday evening without debate. The bill, which has passed the House, would allow the legal distribution of marijuana by doctors and nurses through academic medical centers. A commission would be set up to spell out the terms under which it would be grown and dispensed.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
Michael Phelps' life has calmed down somewhat in the past few days. He isn't waking up to people shouting outside his apartment, and the paparazzi, for the most part, have stopped tailing him. But Phelps still isn't ready to commit to swimming in the 2012 Olympics. The Rodgers Forge native, 23, says it's something he continues to mull. "It will take a few months," Phelps said. "I'll give it 30 or 60 days. I think it will be better. I'm already happier now than I was, just having some part of my life back to normal, being able to swim again, having fun, joking around."
NEWS
May 15, 2003
Evidence shows that marijuana can be medicine If Jeffrey A. Schaler wants to legalize every drug for everybody, he certainly has a right to that opinion ("Decision to smoke pot shouldn't involve doctor," Opinion Commentary, May 12). But it is odd to see him join forces with arch-prohibitionists in demonizing and distorting the views of medical marijuana advocates. And the Marijuana Policy Project - which led the fight for the medical marijuana bill awaiting Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s signature - does not "argue that marijuana is a panacea."
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