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Marie Antoinette

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NEWS
October 15, 2002
Sister Marie Antoinette, a retired first-grade teacher, died of a blood clot Thursday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 82 and had lived at her order's motherhouse in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County since 1978. She taught at St. Margaret Parochial School in Bel Air for 16 years and held other education posts at St. Wenceslaus in East Baltimore, St. Thomas Aquinas in Hampden and St. Michael in Upper Fells Point. Born Carolina Fiermonte in East Boston, Mass., she entered the School Sisters of Notre Dame in Baltimore in 1942 and professed her vows three years later.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
What remarkable lives they led. The five men, who hailed mostly from the pinnacle of French aristocracy, were liberals who threw off their own privileges to build a more equitable society. Individually, they danced with Marie Antoinette, fled the guillotine, spied for their country and played a role in a slave revolt in Haiti. All five relocated to Philadelphia, and in just a handful of years managed to exert a lasting impact on the fledgling United States of America. Francois Furstenberg, an associate professor of history at the Johns Hopkins University, follows the exiles on their American adventures in his new book, "When the United States Spoke French.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 20, 2006
If a high-end patisserie ever went "all you can eat," the result would be something like Marie Antoinette, an endless gourmet pastry tray of a movie put together by a gifted young bakery chef, writer-director Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation). It's high-caloric art-house moviemaking, full of pastry-coated, sugar-swirled ideas and historical moments dipped in candy. They are consumed entirely in the watching of the movie. They leave no aftertaste - no troubling thought, no haunting emotion, except, perhaps, a smile and a tear for Kirsten Dunst's cheerful valor in the title role.
NEWS
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,Los Angeles Times | October 29, 2006
MYTH: When faced with the poor demanding bread, Marie Antoinette, the last proper queen of France, uttered "Let them eat cake." REALITY: Marie Antoinette never said it. "It was first said about Louis XIV's wife. A hundred years earlier. And then it was said about three other people in the early 18th century. And then it got stuck with her," Lady Antonia Fraser said, referring to Marie Antoinette. "It's not her character, because it's callous and ignorant." Fraser, the 74-year-old British doyenne of biography, spent five years researching the extravagant, foolhardy, blighted and ultimately tragic life of the queen, guillotined at 12:15 p.m. on Oct. 16, 1793, in front of what Fraser describes in her biography of the queen as a "joyous public."
FEATURES
By Ellen Sweets and Ellen Sweets,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 11, 1996
Want a little change from the urban pace of Paris? Try the royal palace at Versailles, just 20 miles or so down the road. It is an extraordinary study in how to develop a big piece of property to its best advantage.The town itself, as with many little French towns, would be worth the trip even if the world's most famous palace weren't there. But the palace is there, so the day trip is a super twofer.Versailles has the requisite compact charm: narrow cobblestone streets and a central core complete with an open-air market, or marche, as the French call it.Former Chicagoan Susan Concordet has lived in Paris with her French husband, Jean, for nearly two decades, and she never tires of periodic visits to the historic little city.
NEWS
By Rachel Abramowitz and Rachel Abramowitz,Los Angeles Times | October 29, 2006
MYTH: When faced with the poor demanding bread, Marie Antoinette, the last proper queen of France, uttered "Let them eat cake." REALITY: Marie Antoinette never said it. "It was first said about Louis XIV's wife. A hundred years earlier. And then it was said about three other people in the early 18th century. And then it got stuck with her," Lady Antonia Fraser said, referring to Marie Antoinette. "It's not her character, because it's callous and ignorant." Fraser, the 74-year-old British doyenne of biography, spent five years researching the extravagant, foolhardy, blighted and ultimately tragic life of the queen, guillotined at 12:15 p.m. on Oct. 16, 1793, in front of what Fraser describes in her biography of the queen as a "joyous public."
NEWS
February 1, 2004
On January 29, 2004, MARIE ANTOINETTE BANZ (nee Knauer), beloved wife of the late Francis I. Banz Sr., devoted mother of Carole Cecil, Myrna Pirrera, Francis Banz Jr. and the late Thomas Banz; loving grandmother of 11 and great-mother of 18. Relatives and friends are invited to call Miller-Dippel Funeral Inc., 6415 Belair Road on Sunday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, on Monday,...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Nicol and By Charles Nicol,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
Versailles: A Novel, by Kathryn Davis. Houghton Mifflin. 224 pages. $21. Stunning. Stunningly written, lively, amusing and unpredictable. Describing this as historical fiction, a liberally retouched biography of Marie Antoinette from marriage to the last Louis at age 14 to decapitation, would utterly miss the point. This novel views through a keyhole its main character's reflection in her own white-and-gilt-trimmed hand-mirror. The facts shimmer in a haze. Usually Marie tells her own story, often eloquently, although the author occasionally interrupts to comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 11, 2001
The tent set up on the grounds of the Maryland SPCA was filled with dogs and cats -- and all sorts of other strange and wonderful two-legged creatures. Two-legged because these were some 250 SPCA fans of the human variety, dressed in costume for the organization's second annual "Howl-O-Ween Hop." Party co-chairs Day Bank, Victoria Valton and Linda Vinson came as Alpha Dog, Marie Antoinette (pre-guillotine), and herself, respectively. SPCA board president Randy Brinton appeared as a red Lego block, wife Hillary clicked in as his blue counterpart.
NEWS
By Joanne Jacobs | August 13, 1992
LET THEM eat cake," Marie Antoinette said, when the poor complained they had no bread. Some people thought she was out of touch with domestic issues.Today, 30 million Americans have no access to basic health care, and the Bush administration says, "Let them have liver transplants."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 20, 2006
If a high-end patisserie ever went "all you can eat," the result would be something like Marie Antoinette, an endless gourmet pastry tray of a movie put together by a gifted young bakery chef, writer-director Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation). It's high-caloric art-house moviemaking, full of pastry-coated, sugar-swirled ideas and historical moments dipped in candy. They are consumed entirely in the watching of the movie. They leave no aftertaste - no troubling thought, no haunting emotion, except, perhaps, a smile and a tear for Kirsten Dunst's cheerful valor in the title role.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 3, 2005
Picture it: Paris, 1770s. The most talked-about composer, violinist and orchestra leader in town is equally celebrated for his fencing skill and, the gossip has it, for his conquests with the highest of high society ladies. But when he tries to get the job of director at the Paris Opera, several of the company's prima donnas send a petition against him to the queen, Marie Antionette, declaring that "their honor and the delicate nature of their conscience made it impossible for them to be subjected to the orders of a mulatto."
NEWS
February 1, 2004
On January 29, 2004, MARIE ANTOINETTE BANZ (nee Knauer), beloved wife of the late Francis I. Banz Sr., devoted mother of Carole Cecil, Myrna Pirrera, Francis Banz Jr. and the late Thomas Banz; loving grandmother of 11 and great-mother of 18. Relatives and friends are invited to call Miller-Dippel Funeral Inc., 6415 Belair Road on Sunday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, on Monday,...
NEWS
October 15, 2002
Sister Marie Antoinette, a retired first-grade teacher, died of a blood clot Thursday at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She was 82 and had lived at her order's motherhouse in the Woodbrook section of Baltimore County since 1978. She taught at St. Margaret Parochial School in Bel Air for 16 years and held other education posts at St. Wenceslaus in East Baltimore, St. Thomas Aquinas in Hampden and St. Michael in Upper Fells Point. Born Carolina Fiermonte in East Boston, Mass., she entered the School Sisters of Notre Dame in Baltimore in 1942 and professed her vows three years later.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Charles Nicol and By Charles Nicol,Special to the Sun | August 4, 2002
Versailles: A Novel, by Kathryn Davis. Houghton Mifflin. 224 pages. $21. Stunning. Stunningly written, lively, amusing and unpredictable. Describing this as historical fiction, a liberally retouched biography of Marie Antoinette from marriage to the last Louis at age 14 to decapitation, would utterly miss the point. This novel views through a keyhole its main character's reflection in her own white-and-gilt-trimmed hand-mirror. The facts shimmer in a haze. Usually Marie tells her own story, often eloquently, although the author occasionally interrupts to comment.
NEWS
June 21, 2002
Flunk all pupils who cannot make the grade The Sun's article "City students promoted despite not meeting goals" (June 15) seemed to suggest that the schools' 87 percent attendance rate for ninth-graders was acceptable, while its 78 percent attendance rate among the ninth-graders in a transitional program was not. But 87 percent average attendance means that the typical child misses about 23 days of school per year. Acceptable? I think not. What employer would tolerate such abysmal attendance?
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