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Marian Anderson

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
On Easter Sunday 75 years ago -- April 9, 1939 -- Marian Anderson gave a concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial for a crowd of about 75,000 who braved the cool weather, and a huge national audience listening on radio. The African American contralto, who, Arturo Toscanini famously said, had a voice "such as one hears once in a hundred years," had been barred by segregationist policies from singing at Constitution Hall, run by the Daughters of the American Revolution. With help from the FDR Administration, Lincoln Memorial was made available to Anderson as an alternate site.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
On Easter Sunday 75 years ago -- April 9, 1939 -- Marian Anderson gave a concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial for a crowd of about 75,000 who braved the cool weather, and a huge national audience listening on radio. The African American contralto, who, Arturo Toscanini famously said, had a voice "such as one hears once in a hundred years," had been barred by segregationist policies from singing at Constitution Hall, run by the Daughters of the American Revolution. With help from the FDR Administration, Lincoln Memorial was made available to Anderson as an alternate site.
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TRAVEL
April 12, 2009
Where:: The Lincoln Memorial, Washington When:: 3 p.m. Sunday What:: In 1939, opera singer Marian Anderson was set to perform at Constitution Hall but was turned away when organizers realized she was black. Instead, the Easter concert was held at the Lincoln Memorial. Sunday's event features mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves in a performance paying tribute to the 70th anniversary of Anderson's concert. Graves will be joined by a cappella group Sweet Honey in the Rock. A naturalization ceremony will precede the concert, with a keynote address from former Secretary of State Colin Powell.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2011
When Sidney Hollander Sr., the legendary Baltimore civil rights and social activist, celebrated his 90th birthday in 1972, he reflected on his life's work seeking equality for those who had long been denied it. "I was always warned by my conservative friends that if you give Negroes one finger, they'll want the whole hand," he told a Sun reporter at the time. "That's what I'm for. If they get the whole hand, then they'll finally be equal. "We've broken down a lot of the taboos and restrictions, but we haven't broken down the emotions behind those taboos and restrictions," he said.
NEWS
April 9, 1993
The great contralto Marian Anderson, whose 1939 performance at the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday galvanized the conscience of a nation, died yesterday morning in Portland, Ore., of congestive heart failure. She was 96.Miss Anderson became a symbol of the fight against racial bigotry when the Daughters of the American Revolution refused to allow her to perform at Constitution Hall in Washington. That led first lady Eleanor Roosevelt to resign from the organization. At the request of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the Department of the Interior invited Miss Anderson to give a public recital at the Lincoln Memorial.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | May 8, 1991
There is a moment in tonight's PBS documentary about Marian Anderson when a one-time executive with the Sol Hurok organization talks of gathering with Anderson and a few of his colleagues to view a film of the singer at work.The men from Hurok were there to give advice about editing the film, but when the camera moved in for a close-up of Anderson's stunning face as she sang a spiritual about Christ's silent suffering on the cross, they became fans. When the lights in the screening room came up, tears were streaming down their faces.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 14, 1991
Marian Anderson was a singer who just wanted to sing. In spite of herself she became Joan of Arc.Because she was one of the greatest singers this country has ever produced, Anderson is being honored this week in College Park as the University of Maryland inaugurates the first American Vocal Arts Congress and the new competition named after the great contralto. But with Anderson it's always impossible to forget that what she is is inextricably connected with whom she is.The beauty of the voice -- with its earthy darkness at the bottom, clarinetlike purity in the middle and its piercing vibrancy at the top -- was always matched by a personal beauty as rare as it was purely human.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | April 9, 1993
Marian Anderson was a singer who just wanted to sing. In spite of herself, she transfixed a nation and galvanized its conscience.Miss Anderson -- who died early yesterday morning at age 96 in the Portland, Ore., home of her nephew, conductor James DePreist -- was one of the greatest singers this country has ever produced.But she was a symbol as well as a singer. The sight of her on Easter Sunday in 1939 singing at the Lincoln Memorial -- after the Daughters of the American Revolution had denied her permission to sing at Constitution Hall because of her race -- became one of the most famous images in American history.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1999
It will be an operatic battle when three competitors sing with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center tomorrow.They are finalists in the Marian Anderson International Vocal Competition, which began a week ago at the University of Maryland, College Park. Among the 35 contestants were singers from Lebanon, Korea, Japan, Britain and the United States.The finalists are Barbara Quintiliani, a 22-year-old soprano from Dorchester, Mass.; Tigran Martirosian, a 29-year-old bass from Russia; and Eleni Matos, a 33-year-old mezzo-soprano from Clearwater, Fla. They were chosen from a field of 12 semi-finalists by an international jury.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2003
It stands to reason that a string quartet bearing Marian Anderson's name would blaze a unique trail in the world of classical music. Anderson, after all, was the African-American singer who changed the course of her nation's history with her concert at the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday, 1939. Denied the opportunity to perform at Washington's D.A.R. Constitution Hall because of her race, the artist enthralled 75,000 listeners with the luscious contralto voice destined to become one of the great expressive forces of the 20th century.
TRAVEL
April 12, 2009
Where:: The Lincoln Memorial, Washington When:: 3 p.m. Sunday What:: In 1939, opera singer Marian Anderson was set to perform at Constitution Hall but was turned away when organizers realized she was black. Instead, the Easter concert was held at the Lincoln Memorial. Sunday's event features mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves in a performance paying tribute to the 70th anniversary of Anderson's concert. Graves will be joined by a cappella group Sweet Honey in the Rock. A naturalization ceremony will precede the concert, with a keynote address from former Secretary of State Colin Powell.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2003
For a few moments last week, Allison Stanley got an inkling of what it would be like to be a professional musician. The 15-year-old sophomore at Ellicott City's Homewood School played cello while accompanied by three members of the acclaimed Marian Anderson String Quartet. As she nervously played in front of her classmates, her rendition of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" accompanied by violins and viola filled the room with a beautiful, rich sound. The workshop held in the music room at Homewood, an alternative school, was part of an outreach program run by the Candlelight Concert Society - a nonprofit organization dedicated to the promotion of music in Howard County.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 2003
It stands to reason that a string quartet bearing Marian Anderson's name would blaze a unique trail in the world of classical music. Anderson, after all, was the African-American singer who changed the course of her nation's history with her concert at the Lincoln Memorial on Easter Sunday, 1939. Denied the opportunity to perform at Washington's D.A.R. Constitution Hall because of her race, the artist enthralled 75,000 listeners with the luscious contralto voice destined to become one of the great expressive forces of the 20th century.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1999
It will be an operatic battle when three competitors sing with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center tomorrow.They are finalists in the Marian Anderson International Vocal Competition, which began a week ago at the University of Maryland, College Park. Among the 35 contestants were singers from Lebanon, Korea, Japan, Britain and the United States.The finalists are Barbara Quintiliani, a 22-year-old soprano from Dorchester, Mass.; Tigran Martirosian, a 29-year-old bass from Russia; and Eleni Matos, a 33-year-old mezzo-soprano from Clearwater, Fla. They were chosen from a field of 12 semi-finalists by an international jury.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1999
It could be said that Bugs Bunny gave Barbara Quintiliani her first big break in opera.She was 15 at the time. A Navy brat living in Virginia Beach. A kid with no clue as to what she'd be when she grew up. For lack of anything better to do, she had joined her high school chorus and her attitude was getting on the music director's nerves."
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | March 30, 1997
In a rehearsal room at Morgan State University, Nathan Carter slaps at wobbly pitches as if he were swatting mosquitos."C'mon ladies!" he says. "One, two, sing! Sopranos and altos, sing!"Carter is transforming students slouched in Boss and Hilfiger chic into the precise and powerful instrument he needs to conquer Carnegie Hall. As the singers enter the brilliance of the spiritual "Great Day," the notes fall in line, clean and bright as the righteous marching to heaven.The Morgan State University choir is a week from a concert in New York that will mark another achievement in its distinguished history under Nathan Carter.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 16, 2003
For a few moments last week, Allison Stanley got an inkling of what it would be like to be a professional musician. The 15-year-old sophomore at Ellicott City's Homewood School played cello while accompanied by three members of the acclaimed Marian Anderson String Quartet. As she nervously played in front of her classmates, her rendition of "Twinkle Twinkle Little Star" accompanied by violins and viola filled the room with a beautiful, rich sound. The workshop held in the music room at Homewood, an alternative school, was part of an outreach program run by the Candlelight Concert Society - a nonprofit organization dedicated to the promotion of music in Howard County.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1999
It could be said that Bugs Bunny gave Barbara Quintiliani her first big break in opera.She was 15 at the time. A Navy brat living in Virginia Beach. A kid with no clue as to what she'd be when she grew up. For lack of anything better to do, she had joined her high school chorus and her attitude was getting on the music director's nerves."
NEWS
By Kenneth Meltzer | April 28, 1994
AMERICA lost one of its legendary musical icons last April with the passing of the great contralto Marian Anderson. In commemoration of her incomparable artistry, RCA has reissued on compact disc Miss Anderson's last recordings of Negro spirituals on an album entitled "He's Got the Whole World in His Hands" in the company's "Living Stereo" series. The new CD offers a fine compendium of Miss Anderson's recordings of spirituals and is a fitting tribute to her unceasing efforts on behalf of this great American folk idiom.
NEWS
April 16, 1993
Mike Royko's column on Rodney KingI would like to congratulate Mike Royko on his insightful, intelligent column that appeared in your paper on April 9. Unlike some of the other columnists who appear in your paper, Mike Royko has the courage to point out the truth about the entire Rodney King situation.Hopefully, the general public realizes that media and public attention is often determined by factors other than a search for the truth.The senseless murder of a white foreign tourist has little appeal to the media, which instead would rather exacerbate the situation in Los Angeles and the rest of the country than report the truth.
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