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By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2000
Maria Shriver has it all. She is a mother, an award-winning broadcast journalist and the author of a best-selling children's book. She is the wife of movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger, and a Kennedy. And she has a killer smile. But Shriver's life hasn't been without struggle. She's tried to be Superwoman and failed, been fired as co-anchor of "CBS Morning News" in 1986, and has grieved over the loss of family members. If only someone had told her before she graduated in 1977 from Georgetown University what she could have expected to find in the real world, maybe her life would have been different.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 6, 2012
"You can't run from your mistakes. You have to confront them. " -- Arnold Schwarzenegger Believe it or not, there was a time when people didn't go on TV to confess their sins. That was back when most understood what sin is, before everything became excusable, especially for celebrities and the politically powerful. Former California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is on a media tour promoting his book, "Total Recall: My Unbelievably True Life Story. " It certainly is. On "60 Minutes," in USA Today and elsewhere, Mr. Schwarzenegger acknowledges affairs with women not his wife and the son he fathered with their housekeeper.
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FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 4, 1994
One sport ends, another gets into gear. College basketball crowns a 1994 champion tonight, while ESPN provides its first major league baseball doubleheader of this very, very young season. If you're not a good sport about good sports, there are a few other things worth mentioning.* "Opening Day '94" (noon-1 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- This program previews the Orioles' season . . .* "Gimme An 'O' " (2-2:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- . . . as does this show . . .* "Orioles baseball" (3 p.m.-conclusion, WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
Battling Alzheimer's disease is often a private struggle, with few champions who speak on behalf of patients and their loved ones. But the family of R. Sargent Shriver, who died Tuesday, helped shed light on the disease and spur support and research for its causes. Since his diagnosis in 2003, the family of the influential public servant and founder of the Peace Corps had sought to change the public perception of people with Alzheimer's so they would not be viewed as victims, said geriatrician William Thomas, professor at UMBC's Erickson School of Aging.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2004
Her white-blond hair swept into a black swim turban, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, 83, cut a rail-thin but commanding figure in the middle of her backyard pool. "Now watch Mrs. Shriver's arms," she said to the group of young people around her, before launching into a smooth, sure crawl stroke. "I was a very good swimmer when I was your age." Thirty-six years after she last ran a summer camp for the mentally disabled, which eventually turned into the Special Olympics, Shriver was at it again - trying to show the world that these are people who can participate perfectly well in sports if only someone is willing to show them how. For two weeks, about 60 disabled campers - along with volunteer counselors who include some of Shriver's famous children and grandchildren - have roamed her Potomac estate, learning sports from basketball to bocce.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | August 8, 2003
Opening campaign speech of new California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger: My friends: I stand before you, tanned and powerful, with perfect white teeth, but also humbled by your applause. People ask me: "Ah-nult, why are you running for governor?" Very simple, my friends. To win! To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of the women! Dat is what politics is about, my friends! As you know, dere are dose who would deny me this prize.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 21, 1994
Charles Kuralt shows up in prime time tonight. That's the good news. So do the "Mighty Morphin Power Rangers." That's the bad news.* "The Simpsons" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- In tonight's rerun episode, Bart wins a pachyderm in a radio contest. I'd give more details, but they're irrelephant. Fox repeat.* "Mighty Morphin Power Rangers" (8:30 p.m.-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Be afraid. Be very afraid. This is Fox's first prime-time glimpse at the latest craze to infect children's television.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
Mercedes Linton Shriver, an ardent environmentalist and an artist whose designer silk wraps are sold worldwide, died Wednesday of internal injuries after a fall down a cliff while hiking one of her favorite trails near her home in Saint-Barthelemy. She was 41 and had lived on the small Caribbean island in the French West Indies for about five years. Born in Baltimore and known as Merc, Ms. Shriver was a graduate of Maryvale Preparatory School and studied art later at a variety of places, including the Maryland Institute College of Art, the San Francisco Art Institute and the Telluride AhHa School.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Darren M. Allen and Frank Langfitt and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writers | May 22, 1994
William James Cunningham walked onto the Baltimore Arena's stage yesterday before several thousand people, accepted his diploma and then leapt into his father's arms.After six years and two majors at Loyola College, Mr. Cunningham had finally graduated with the help of his father, Francis, a philosophy professor and assistant provost at the school."It's been a long time coming," said the senior, who hopes to teach math or work in the Peace Corps.Mr. Cunningham joined more than 2,400 men and women around Maryland yesterday in celebrating years of work on their final day as college undergraduate or graduate students.
NEWS
By Peter Nicholas and Peter Nicholas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2004
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - California first lady Maria Shriver is backing off her plan to convert the state's history museum into an exhibition dedicated solely to women, a concession to those who feared California's past would be overshadowed in the new design. At Shriver's urging, the board that runs the California State History Museum voted Tuesday to approve a new concept in which women's history would be folded into a larger facility dedicated to state history as a whole. The action comes after three board members stepped down to protest what they saw as an exclusive focus on the role of women in California history.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Abigail Tucker and Chris Kaltenbach and Abigail Tucker and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2005
In his final column for The New York Times, former Hollywood reporter Bernard Weinraub included a startling confession: That perhaps he should have stopped writing about the film industry after marrying a powerful studio executive. "Clearly, I stayed too long on my beat, clinging to a notion that I could sidestep conflicts of interest by avoiding direct coverage of Sony," he wrote last Sunday of his 1997 marriage to Amy Pascal, who would later become the chairwoman of Sony Pictures. Weinraub switched coverage areas several years after the fact, but critics maintained that this was too late, and in the column, Weinraub expressed regret that his marriage may have sullied his newspaper's reputation.
NEWS
By Peter Nicholas and Peter Nicholas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 26, 2004
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - California first lady Maria Shriver is backing off her plan to convert the state's history museum into an exhibition dedicated solely to women, a concession to those who feared California's past would be overshadowed in the new design. At Shriver's urging, the board that runs the California State History Museum voted Tuesday to approve a new concept in which women's history would be folded into a larger facility dedicated to state history as a whole. The action comes after three board members stepped down to protest what they saw as an exclusive focus on the role of women in California history.
FEATURES
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2004
Her white-blond hair swept into a black swim turban, Eunice Kennedy Shriver, 83, cut a rail-thin but commanding figure in the middle of her backyard pool. "Now watch Mrs. Shriver's arms," she said to the group of young people around her, before launching into a smooth, sure crawl stroke. "I was a very good swimmer when I was your age." Thirty-six years after she last ran a summer camp for the mentally disabled, which eventually turned into the Special Olympics, Shriver was at it again - trying to show the world that these are people who can participate perfectly well in sports if only someone is willing to show them how. For two weeks, about 60 disabled campers - along with volunteer counselors who include some of Shriver's famous children and grandchildren - have roamed her Potomac estate, learning sports from basketball to bocce.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES -- In a stunning finale to a tumultuous campaign, angry California voters fired Gov. Gray Davis less than a year into his term and lifted movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger into the governor's chair in yesterday's recall election. Schwarzenegger overcame a stream of last-minute newspaper reports about alleged improper sexual conduct to gain elective office on the first try. Among the keys to his victory were backing from independent voters and stronger-than-expected support from women, exit polling showed.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 8, 2003
LOS ANGELES - In a stunning finale to a tumultuous campaign, angry California voters fired Gov. Gray Davis less than a year into his term and lifted movie star Arnold Schwarzenegger into the governor's chair, according to exit polling and early returns in yesterday's recall election. Schwarzenegger, in his first try for elective office, scored a resounding victory in spite of a withering string of last-minute newspaper reports about his alleged improper sexual conduct. Among the keys was his backing from independent voters and stronger-than-expected support from white women, the exit poll showed.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | August 8, 2003
Opening campaign speech of new California gubernatorial candidate Arnold Schwarzenegger: My friends: I stand before you, tanned and powerful, with perfect white teeth, but also humbled by your applause. People ask me: "Ah-nult, why are you running for governor?" Very simple, my friends. To win! To crush your enemies, see them driven before you, and to hear the lamentation of the women! Dat is what politics is about, my friends! As you know, dere are dose who would deny me this prize.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2011
Battling Alzheimer's disease is often a private struggle, with few champions who speak on behalf of patients and their loved ones. But the family of R. Sargent Shriver, who died Tuesday, helped shed light on the disease and spur support and research for its causes. Since his diagnosis in 2003, the family of the influential public servant and founder of the Peace Corps had sought to change the public perception of people with Alzheimer's so they would not be viewed as victims, said geriatrician William Thomas, professor at UMBC's Erickson School of Aging.
FEATURES
By Sylvia Badger | November 3, 1990
Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Schwarzenegger -- she, of course, is Maria Shriver -- have agreed to be the honorary co-chairs for Pam Shriver's fifth annual charity tennis tournament (Maria and Pam are cousins). Thanks to Pam's efforts, Cystic Fibrosis (CF) received more than $650,000 from the past four tournaments. This year's proceeds will be divided between CF, Children's Hospital and Center for Reconstructive Surgery and the Greater Baltimore Tennis Patrons Association.The First National Bank Tennis Festival presented by The Baltimore Sun for a Child's Benefit -- that's a mouthful but it's the official title -- will begin the two-day festival with an expensive gala on Monday, Nov. 26. Tickets are $750 a couple for the gala and a pair of tickets for the tennis exhibition the next day at the Baltimore Arena.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
Mercedes Linton Shriver, an ardent environmentalist and an artist whose designer silk wraps are sold worldwide, died Wednesday of internal injuries after a fall down a cliff while hiking one of her favorite trails near her home in Saint-Barthelemy. She was 41 and had lived on the small Caribbean island in the French West Indies for about five years. Born in Baltimore and known as Merc, Ms. Shriver was a graduate of Maryvale Preparatory School and studied art later at a variety of places, including the Maryland Institute College of Art, the San Francisco Art Institute and the Telluride AhHa School.
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