Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMarguerite Henry
IN THE NEWS

Marguerite Henry

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1997
There aren't many books more widely read by Maryland children than "Misty of Chincoteague," the story of two orphans, Paul and Maureen Beebe, who live with their grandparents in Chincoteague, Va., and dream of rearing a wild pony.The heart-warming tale, which has charmed readers for 50 years and has been translated into a dozen languages, was written by Marguerite Henry, who died at her home in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., last month at the age of 95.Henry wrote 59 books, including "King of the Wind," "Justin Morgan Had a Horse," "Brighty of the Grand Canyon," and "Born to Trot."
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Rona Kobell, For The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
This would be the one where we stayed home, my husband and I agreed before the recent holidays. No Christmas flight to Texas to visit his family. No four-hour drive through the mountains to Pittsburgh for Thanksgiving dinner with my dad. With two busy careers, an active 8-year-old and a toddler who had taken to saying "no night-night" when it's time for bed, we didn't have the energy. Even a low-maintenance weekend jaunt to New York on BoltBus seemed like too much work. But then the 8-year-old read "Misty of Chincoteague" that wonderful book about a horse born in the wilds of Assateague Island and raised on Chincoteague Island.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | July 26, 2012
Tens of thousands of people turned out Wednesday for the annual Chincoteague wild pony swim, an event made famous by Marguerite Henry's novel, "Misty of Chincoteague. " About 175 ponies crossed Assateague Channel, and many are auctioned off to support the Virginia town's fire services. The rest of the ponies return to the island. It's the biggest day of the year for little Chincoteague, as tourists pour into town for the swim and auction, as well as related events, such as free showings of the "Misty" movie . For some spectators, the event was a dream come true, according to Baltimore Sun reporter Erin Cox, who was there for the day. "This has been my lifelong dream since I was 8 years old," Robin Dodge, 55, who drove from upstate New York with her husband, told Cox. Sun photographer Karl Merton Ferron captured the event in pictures.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | July 26, 2012
Tens of thousands of people turned out Wednesday for the annual Chincoteague wild pony swim, an event made famous by Marguerite Henry's novel, "Misty of Chincoteague. " About 175 ponies crossed Assateague Channel, and many are auctioned off to support the Virginia town's fire services. The rest of the ponies return to the island. It's the biggest day of the year for little Chincoteague, as tourists pour into town for the swim and auction, as well as related events, such as free showings of the "Misty" movie . For some spectators, the event was a dream come true, according to Baltimore Sun reporter Erin Cox, who was there for the day. "This has been my lifelong dream since I was 8 years old," Robin Dodge, 55, who drove from upstate New York with her husband, told Cox. Sun photographer Karl Merton Ferron captured the event in pictures.
TRAVEL
By Rona Kobell, For The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
This would be the one where we stayed home, my husband and I agreed before the recent holidays. No Christmas flight to Texas to visit his family. No four-hour drive through the mountains to Pittsburgh for Thanksgiving dinner with my dad. With two busy careers, an active 8-year-old and a toddler who had taken to saying "no night-night" when it's time for bed, we didn't have the energy. Even a low-maintenance weekend jaunt to New York on BoltBus seemed like too much work. But then the 8-year-old read "Misty of Chincoteague" that wonderful book about a horse born in the wilds of Assateague Island and raised on Chincoteague Island.
FEATURES
By Audrey Haar and Audrey Haar,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
Chincoteague, Va.--Chincoteague loves its ponies.The annual pony swim from Assateague Island to Chincoteague Island is the star attraction that draws crowds from around the world each July.Children arrive in town clutching their well-worn copies of the novel "Misty of Chincoteague" by Marguerite Henry. Volunteer firemen play cowboy and mount horses for the pony roundup. Spectators get to enjoy the show.Festivities for the pony swim start this morning when the horses that roam the Virginia side of Assateague Island are rounded up by about 40 cowboys and culminate with the pony swim Wednesday and a colt auction Thursday.
NEWS
February 6, 2000
"I like the book 'Walt Disney Presents The Little Mermaid' by Michael Teitelbaum. In the story, an evil sea witch turned Ariel into a human and Ariel gets married to Prince Eric. The book is exciting." -- Tori Thomas, Garnett Elementary "My favorite book is 'King of the Wind' by Marguerite Henry. It is about a kid named Agba who takes care of a horse named Sham and the obstacles they have to overcome. I like this book because it is very descriptive and tells the story very well. If you like horses, I recommend this book for you."
NEWS
August 23, 2000
"I like `Striped Zebra' by Hannah Giffard. It is all about animals and their colors and the lines on the zebra." - Sequoia Smith Deep Creek Elementary "My favorite book is `The Foot Book' by Dr. Seuss because I like the illustrations and the words. I think it is a good book." - JoAnna Weston Bedford Elementary "I liked `King of the Wind' by Marguerite Henry because it's an adventure book that's full of surprises, like when Mr. Twickerham, the head stablemaster, saves Agba and Sham."
NEWS
By CHRISTOPHER T. ASSAF and CHRISTOPHER T. ASSAF,SUN STAFF | August 6, 2006
"The cowboys can be a little gruff." That phrase resonated repeatedly during my time in Chincoteague Island, Va., covering the Saltwater Cowboys and the annual pony penning and swim. Many a young girl, including my sister, has read about the swim, immortalized by Marguerite Henry in her 1947 book Misty of Chincoteague, and dreamed of owning a Chincoteague Wild Pony. This was the 81st year that cowboys gathered for the roundup from near and far under the auspices of the Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Company, owners of the ponies on the Virginia side of Assateague Island.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
— As the herd of wild ponies emerged on the horizon Wednesday morning, Robin Dodge looked across the water to see her childhood fantasy come true. More than 145 horses were poised at the Assateague Channel for the annual 75-yard swim, a tradition that has outlived most people on this tiny Virginia island. "This has been my lifelong dream since I was 8 years old," said Dodge, 55, who drove from upstate New York with her husband. Moments later, a voice crackled over the loudspeaker, assuring a crowd that would eventually swell to 40,000 that this was not a dream: "If you can hear me talking, you're here now. " Unlike petting Black Beauty, watching the Pony Swim of Chincoteague is a fantasy that can be lived in adulthood.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1997
There aren't many books more widely read by Maryland children than "Misty of Chincoteague," the story of two orphans, Paul and Maureen Beebe, who live with their grandparents in Chincoteague, Va., and dream of rearing a wild pony.The heart-warming tale, which has charmed readers for 50 years and has been translated into a dozen languages, was written by Marguerite Henry, who died at her home in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., last month at the age of 95.Henry wrote 59 books, including "King of the Wind," "Justin Morgan Had a Horse," "Brighty of the Grand Canyon," and "Born to Trot."
FEATURES
By Audrey Haar and Audrey Haar,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
Chincoteague, Va.--Chincoteague loves its ponies.The annual pony swim from Assateague Island to Chincoteague Island is the star attraction that draws crowds from around the world each July.Children arrive in town clutching their well-worn copies of the novel "Misty of Chincoteague" by Marguerite Henry. Volunteer firemen play cowboy and mount horses for the pony roundup. Spectators get to enjoy the show.Festivities for the pony swim start this morning when the horses that roam the Virginia side of Assateague Island are rounded up by about 40 cowboys and culminate with the pony swim Wednesday and a colt auction Thursday.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | January 6, 1992
Ten wild ponies, possibly a third of those that roamed the narrow northern end of Assateague Island, died during the severe northeaster that ravaged the Maryland and Delaware coasts Saturday.The deaths were the first in at least a quarter-century under such circumstances on the rugged, low-lying barrier island, authorities said. All of the island is either national or state parkland."It hit so fast. I would suspect they were caught without being able to get away from it," said Roger Rector, superintendent of Assateague Island National Seashore.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | June 18, 2005
THE SIGNIFICANCE of the moment was clearly lost on these youngsters; mostly 1- and 2-year-olds, trucked hundreds of miles across the country to find themselves clustered in makeshift pens in the middle of a Lorton, Va., field one recent Saturday morning. This was a chance for horses fresh off the Western range to catch the eye of a prospective adopter, someone to love and care for them and provide a safe new home. Particularly for those without striking colors to distinguish them from the predominant bays, a quick bonding with humans gazing through the fence was their best shot to be chosen.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.