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Marge Schott

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NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | February 6, 1993
Baseball said ''I'm sorry'' when it punished Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott with a one-year suspension for making racial slurs against blacks and Jews.But saying sorry isn't enough if that means Ms. Schott and her fellow team owners now go back to business as usual.Bad as was what Ms. Schott did, she is in the spotlight only because she was unlucky enough to get caught, not because such attitudes are that uncommon in baseball. Baseball's bigotry goes beyond Ms. Schott.Fellow team owners who heard her make the ugly remarks she is alleged to have uttered repeatedly over the years made no protest at the time.
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NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 15, 1997
Here's an FYI to Baltimoreans reflecting on Bob Irsay today: There's neither Biblical nor federal law against speaking ill of the dead. The reference material at my fingertips indicates that the widely-honored advice -- "De mortuis nil nisi bonum" (Of the dead, nothing but good) -- comes from one of the Seven Sages of Antiquity. It's unclear which of the wise old birds said it, but the admonition shows up as a quote from "Diogenes Laertius, Lives of the Eminent Philosophers." (Diogenes Laertius should not be confused with Just Plain Diogenes who, as every recipient of an American public high school education knows, was the philosopher who lived in a tub, and who walked around Athens with a lava lamp looking for a man of great virtue.
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NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | December 4, 1992
Washington. -- The president of the Cincinnati Reds baseball team, Marge Schott, hit for the cycle last week. She singled with the remark that Adolf Hitler was an OK ruler during his first years as dictator, though she allowed that he lost momentum later on.Then she doubled her problems by saying that she wasn't aware the slang word ''Jap'' was offensive to people of Japanese origin. (After all, that's what Americans of her generation called the Japanese during World War II).Next at-bat, Ms. Schott went three-for-three, tripling her infractions by employing the ultimate derogatory term a white person can utter.
SPORTS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | June 5, 1996
CINCINNATI -- Major League Baseball's Executive Council will seek to suspend controversial Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott for an indefinite period -- at least through the remainder of the 1996 season -- when it meets today in Philadelphia, sources have told the San Francisco Chronicle.Sources within baseball and the Reds organization say the suspension would be the first step toward wresting day-to-day control of the team away from baseball's only female owner. Late yesterday, Schott was summoned to Philadelphia for today's meeting, a highly unusual step.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | December 9, 1992
You don't think of poets as confrontational. Emily Dickinson, as far as I can tell, never left the house. And, if I'm ever in a bar fight, I'm going after the guy who has just finished penning an ode to a nightingale. Poets may write about big shoulders, but they don't usually have them.There are some exceptions in the poetry world. Rudyard Kipling. Muhammad Ali. But, basically, you know what I mean.And then I heard about Nikki Giovanni, a poet with decidedly small shoulders who took on Marge Schott the other night.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | December 3, 1992
NADINE STROSSEN, the president of the American Civil Liberties Union, down from New York a few weeks ago, came by to chat with editorial writers.I wish it had been this week. She could have explained to mehow in recent days the ACLU had said, (1) yes, Marge Schott, the owner of the Cincinnati Reds baseball team, could be punished because she made disparaging remarks about blacks, but (2) no, Paris, the rap singer could not be punished for his new album that includes a song happily fantasizing about, if not in fact, advocating the assassination of President Bush.
SPORTS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | June 5, 1996
CINCINNATI -- Major League Baseball's Executive Council will seek to suspend controversial Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott for an indefinite period -- at least through the remainder of the 1996 season -- when it meets today in Philadelphia, sources have told the San Francisco Chronicle.Sources within baseball and the Reds organization say the suspension would be the first step toward wresting day-to-day control of the team away from baseball's only female owner. Late yesterday, Schott was summoned to Philadelphia for today's meeting, a highly unusual step.
NEWS
April 12, 1993
"The regulation ignited a firestorm of public anger against United Way . . ." -- news story, The Sun, March 30."The original rezoning plan touched off a firestorm of protests . . ." -- news story, The Sun, March 18."In recent weeks, a firestorm of criticism has surrounded NBC . . ." -- column, The Sun, March 3."Arnick has walked himself into a firestorm of outrage . . ." -- column, The Sun, Feb. 16."School rezoning proposal, which set off a firestorm of public criticism." -- news story, The Sun, Feb. 7."
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 9, 1993
Washington -- A caller to a radio show recently suggested that the fate of Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott, punished by fellow baseball owners for uttering racial slurs, should be left up to market forces. If the fans are offended, the caller reasons, the fans should stay away from her ballpark.That, to me, is free advice that's worth every penny of what the listener pays to hear it.But there is another way that market forces could play a bigger role in encouraging equal opportunity. Former Harvard Law Professor Derrick Bell suggests something similar in his book ''Faces at the Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | February 8, 1993
MARGE SCHOTT, the boss of the Cincinnati Reds, was fined $25,000 last week for having used the word "nigger."Many commentators say the fine was too little. It was, but you gotta like the trend line.When Thurgood Marshall was in law school, he got a summer job at the Gibson Island Club, where his father was head steward.Years later Marshall told this story, in exaggerated dialect for effect, to a friend: "There I was, workin' at the club, when in came a U.S. senator from out West -- a very crude fellah, a very vulgah individual -- with a bevy of beautiful women on his arm. "He takes a seat and yells over, 'Hey, nigger!
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | May 28, 1996
Sinclair Broadcasting, which owns Channel 45 and manages Channel 54, has acquired the local over-the-air rights to the Oct. 13 meeting between the current Baltimore football entry, the Ravens, and the former Baltimore football entry, the Colts, in Indianapolis.The game, which airs nationally on TNT, will be shown on Channel 54, and will be preceded by a pre-game show that examines the history of football in Charm City, as well as previewing the game. The station will have to carry TNT's feed, but will receive time within the telecast to sell its own commercial spots.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | May 30, 1994
I do not wear an earring. I don't wear any earrings because I don't understand them.What I don't understand is why people think it's necessary to have objects hanging from their ears or, for that matter, from any of your major body parts.There is the pain factor to consider. People whose ears are pierced tell me it's not painful to stick a pin through your ear lobe. This makes no sense. I tell them I don't stick pins in any parts of my body any more than I voluntarily drop blocks of cement on my head or read books written by Tom Clancy.
NEWS
April 12, 1993
"The regulation ignited a firestorm of public anger against United Way . . ." -- news story, The Sun, March 30."The original rezoning plan touched off a firestorm of protests . . ." -- news story, The Sun, March 18."In recent weeks, a firestorm of criticism has surrounded NBC . . ." -- column, The Sun, March 3."Arnick has walked himself into a firestorm of outrage . . ." -- column, The Sun, Feb. 16."School rezoning proposal, which set off a firestorm of public criticism." -- news story, The Sun, Feb. 7."
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | April 5, 1993
It's so nice of Jesse Jackson to join the fight against discrimination in baseball. We all should be grateful for the circumstances that led him to protest outside Camden Yards today.Jesse wouldn't be here if Marge Schott hadn't created a national furor with her overt racism. He wouldn't be here if President Clinton were attending a season opener in another city. And, heaven knows, he wouldn't be here if he were busy running for president himself.But here he is, pointing his finger, botching the facts, even smearing the wrong team.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | February 10, 1993
WE pride ourselves on purging the last vestiges of bigotry from American life. Marge Schott, the foul-mouthed owner of the Cincinnati Reds baseball team, was fined and shamed for using words like "nigger" and "money-grubbing Jews." Official offense takers like Jesse Jackson (whose own record on bigotry is hardly pristine -- remember "Hymietown"?) and Al Sharpton (the charlatan who perpetrated the Tawana Brawley fraud) visited the team owners to demand that Schott be punished.No tears for Marge Schott, who sounds like a poisonous old woman.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 9, 1993
Washington -- A caller to a radio show recently suggested that the fate of Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott, punished by fellow baseball owners for uttering racial slurs, should be left up to market forces. If the fans are offended, the caller reasons, the fans should stay away from her ballpark.That, to me, is free advice that's worth every penny of what the listener pays to hear it.But there is another way that market forces could play a bigger role in encouraging equal opportunity. Former Harvard Law Professor Derrick Bell suggests something similar in his book ''Faces at the Bottom of the Well: The Permanence of Racism.
NEWS
By Acel Moore | December 4, 1992
ALTHOUGH the color line in professional basketball, football and baseball was broken more than a generation ago, big-league sports are still deeply rooted in this nation's racial divide.Bigotry routinely is expressed by players, fans, sports commentators and owners. Usually it is not overt. Mostly it is only implied -- just under the surface of ordinary conversations.From time to time, though, it erupts dramatically.Former CBS football commentator and handicapper Jimmy the Greek got into trouble a few years ago by suggesting that black athletes were superior because slave owners a century ago bred African-Americans for their strength.
SPORTS
By Jim Henneman and Jim Henneman,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
Baseball's executive council, the ruling body governing the major leagues in the absence of a commissioner, apparently will vote tomorrow before announcing the one-year suspension of Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott."
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | February 8, 1993
MARGE SCHOTT, the boss of the Cincinnati Reds, was fined $25,000 last week for having used the word "nigger."Many commentators say the fine was too little. It was, but you gotta like the trend line.When Thurgood Marshall was in law school, he got a summer job at the Gibson Island Club, where his father was head steward.Years later Marshall told this story, in exaggerated dialect for effect, to a friend: "There I was, workin' at the club, when in came a U.S. senator from out West -- a very crude fellah, a very vulgah individual -- with a bevy of beautiful women on his arm. "He takes a seat and yells over, 'Hey, nigger!
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | February 6, 1993
Baseball said ''I'm sorry'' when it punished Cincinnati Reds owner Marge Schott with a one-year suspension for making racial slurs against blacks and Jews.But saying sorry isn't enough if that means Ms. Schott and her fellow team owners now go back to business as usual.Bad as was what Ms. Schott did, she is in the spotlight only because she was unlucky enough to get caught, not because such attitudes are that uncommon in baseball. Baseball's bigotry goes beyond Ms. Schott.Fellow team owners who heard her make the ugly remarks she is alleged to have uttered repeatedly over the years made no protest at the time.
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