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Margarita

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NEWS
April 10, 2003
On Monday, April 7, 2003, MARGARITA D. MOSS; departed this life at Johns Hopkins Hospital; beloved wife of John Irving Moss; devoted mother of Malik Luis, Ana Maria, Zalrira Esther. She also leaves two grandchildren, Jaylan Carnell Hall and Antwone Davis, Jr.; and a host of aunts, uncles, cousins, and other relatives and friends. Family will receive friends at the Locust United Methodist Church, Martin & Freetown Road, Columbia, MD. on Thursday, April 10 from 6 to 8 P.M. Funeral services will be held on Friday, April 11, 2003 at the Inter-Faith Center, 10431 Twin Rivers Road, Columbia, MD at 12 noon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
It sounds like the start of a bad joke: "One time in Vietnam, I had the best margarita. " Wait, what? No, but seriously, at Saigon Today in Canton, I found an unexpectedly delicious South of the Border gem hidden among the specialty cocktails: the Cinnamon Margarita. When Saigon opened this summer (in the spot formerly occupied by Yellow Dog Tavern), I was pretty pumped. Not only is it hard to find really good pho (a Vietnamese noodle soup) in Baltimore, it's just difficult to find an Asian restaurant that serves anything beyond imported beers and wine.
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FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 30, 1995
When I heard about the campaign to keep tequila in the margarita cocktail, I perked up. The question of what makes a margarita legit may not be a major worry of the Western world, but it touches on the broader issues of cocktail-making tradition and cocktail purity. These are concerns that get me in a lather.The mere mention of the words gin rickey, for instance, starts me on a diatribe on how hard it is to find a bartender who knows how to make the proper version of this summer cocktail.
NEWS
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Nearly everybody loves a good Mexican restaurant. A bowl of chips and a dish of spicy, fresh salsa put smiles on even the saddest faces. So it's good to hear that the small, local chain La Tolteca has opened a new outpost. The restaurant on York Road in Cockeysville opened in January, and since Day 1, it has been a hit with the locals. Scene & Decor When we arrived around 6:30 on a Thursday evening, we groaned at the sight of a full parking lot and the crowd at the door. La Tolteca was packed.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2010
Those of us in the 200-Pound Drinking Men's Club of Maryland would like to thank House Judiciary Committee Chairman Joseph F. Vallario Jr. for protecting our right to slam down six margaritas in an hour without having to fear being told to install some high-tech gadget on our cars to keep us from driving drunk again. Under legislation that passed the Maryland Senate under prodding by Mothers Against Drunk Driving, we 200-pounders would have been told by the Nanny State that we couldn't drink more than a measly three of our favorite tequila drinks in 60 minutes without the risk of being saddled with an ignition interlock device for six months.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Murphy-Larronde | December 26, 1993
Tequila was consumed primarily by Mexicans until the 1970s when it began winning acceptance on the international market. Ten years later, exports constituted nearly half of annual production levels. Today, as in the past, the United States is the largest foreign customer of the brew, but sales have expanded to include more than 50 other countries, including Germany, Belgium, France, Canada, Scotland and Japan (famous for buying the best aged varieties which fetch about $60 per bottle).The invention of the margarita more than 20 years ago proved a boon for Mexico's tequila industry, and to this day it remains a big favorite with North Americans.
FEATURES
By Leslie Walker | October 7, 1990
Margarita Island, Venezuela's premier beach resort and one of the few remaining jewels in the Caribbean, has been reported ripe for plundering for years.Travel writers warn each year that bulldozers are poised at the edge of Margarita's white-on-white beaches, ready to flatten the dunes and make way for 20-story condos and hotels. Hurry up, they cry, before it's too late to enjoy this drowsy island paradise, before developers chase away the fishermen by poisoning the surrounding seas teeming with red snapper.
FEATURES
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
The pom is the bomb. The intense red pomegranate has become the summer's hipster fruit. We first found it last month in the delicious pomegranate margarita at Holy Frijoles in Hampden. This is a refreshing, not-too-sweet pink drink that perfectly complements warm summer evenings. Wondering if Holy Frijoles had a monopoly on the market, and desperate to find some more fantastic new drinks, The Sun went on a pomegranate pub crawl: nine bars in five hours, from Federal Hill to Canton to Mount Vernon.
NEWS
By Brad Schleicher and Brad Schleicher,Sun Reporter | February 21, 2007
To the untrained eye, the blood orange, which originated in 17th-century Sicily, might seem like any midsized orange or grapefruit that has passed its prime. On the contrary, the spotted crimson skin of a blood orange is perfectly normal. "Connoisseurs of citrus fruits consider these oranges to be among some of the world's finest dessert oranges," says Alan Davidson in The Penguin Companion to Food. There are three varieties of blood orange: the Moro, the Tarocco and the Sanguinello. Each orange ripens at different times of the year and is grown in immense quantities in the Mediterranean region.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | June 3, 2001
The sticky evening air simmered with mariachi music, providing the perfect backdrop to enjoy the salty bite of a margarita. And that was only for starters at "Fiesta Latina 2001," a fund-raiser for Centro de la Comunidad. Many of the 200 guests browsed the buffet at Lista's Restaurant and danced up a storm to the Latin beat of Grupo Latino Continental -- both activities again requiring further margarita reinforcements for many of the participants. Among those at the party: Lilian Laszlo, event chair; Nancy Alexandrou, event committee member; Dr. Leonardo R. Ortega, Centro de la Comunidad board president; Dr. Magaly Rodriguez de Bittner, Antonio Salazar, Dr. Sonia Fierro-Luperini and Hector Torres, board members; Carmen Nieves, Centro de la Comunidad executive director; Jane Harrison, Abell Foundation senior program officer; Angelo Solera, Baltimore Health Department Hispanic community liaison; Ana Bertrando, Career Communications Group Inc. conference coordinator; Mario Armstrong, Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development IT manager; Bill Stagg, Prince George's County Hispanic Advisory Committee chair; Albert Smink, ARTEX Inc. safety manager; Vincent Talarico, retired General Electric vice president; Dr. Christos Davatzikos, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine professor of radiology; Wendy Senft and Sue Glick, English as a second language teachers; Susana Ptak, I.H. Services Inc. owner; Ruth Hernandez, David M. Lutz PA paralegal; and Ruth Crystal, Cramer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | April 29, 2014
Cinco de Mayo is upon us, Baltimore. And while the time-honored tradition of raising a "Mexican" beer or other frosty beverage in honor of the Mexican army's triumph over the French in 1862 at the Battle of Puebla (but you knew that, right?) may seem, ahem, so very college, there's no shame in participating in that game when it comes to fully owning it and indulging in a comically oversized margarita. There is no other place in this city that you, intrepid reveler, should be enjoying such a thing as the crowned King of Comically Oversized Margaritas at Nacho Mama's of Canton Square.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Every college town needs at least one decent, inexpensive, fun Mexican food spot. In Towson, El Rodeo might be that place - but it seems to wish it was more. The Allegheny Avenue restaurant, which opened in early 2012, hits the right notes when it keeps things simple, fresh and low-key. It's less successful with attempts to elevate cuisine into gourmet territory. And while the staff's laid-back attitude is okay for a casual spot, the service needs fine-tuning. Drinks The margarita and sangria (both $3 during happy hour, which runs from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. daily)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, Special To The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2012
Poncho N Pepe's is a party place. Even on a Wednesday evening, the bar is packed and tables are filled, often with large, laughing groups. Everybody, from the hostess to the waiter, is friendly. It's bright, festive, and most of all, fun. The Crofton restaurant opened in April in the space that housed Jasper's for more than two decades. Land and Sea Group, which owns Poncho N Pepe's along with several other area restaurants (including Buddy's on Main Street in Annapolis and Yellowfin Steak & Fish House)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | March 19, 2012
I don't know about you, but this weather has made me want to drink. Hoping to will sunshine and cool breezes, I've been ordering every fruity, refreshing cocktail I can get my pasty, white hands on. I yearn for a summer tan, sun dresses, surf, sand, picnics in the park. Perfect timing, then, for Miss Shirley's to answer the call with their spiked take on a summer classic: the Strawberry Margarita Spritzer•. You may be familiar with the non-alcoholic version; it's Shirley's most popular drink.
TRAVEL
By Jay Clarke and By Jay Clarke,Knight Ridder / Tribune | March 31, 2002
Last summer, 16-year-old Margarita Weintraub, a junior at Ransom Everglades High School in Miami, spent four weeks in Chile on a student exchange program conducted by the Experiment in International Living. "The whole experience was amazing," she said. She and her group of 12 toured Santiago, Chile's capital city, for a few days, then traveled to a small town where each lived with a different family. "While our brothers and sisters [the children of their host families] went to school, we went to classes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2013
Every college town needs at least one decent, inexpensive, fun Mexican food spot. In Towson, El Rodeo might be that place - but it seems to wish it was more. The Allegheny Avenue restaurant, which opened in early 2012, hits the right notes when it keeps things simple, fresh and low-key. It's less successful with attempts to elevate cuisine into gourmet territory. And while the staff's laid-back attitude is okay for a casual spot, the service needs fine-tuning. Drinks The margarita and sangria (both $3 during happy hour, which runs from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. daily)
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