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By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | August 28, 1991
Thanks to your microwave oven, you can make trying new vegetables, such as kohlrabi, quicker and easier than ever. This sweet and lemony side dish is ready for sampling in less than 10 minutes.In case you're wondering, kohlrabi is a round vegetable that tastes like a cross between a cabbage and a turnip. How do you prepare it? Cut off the top, then use a sharp knife to pull off the strips of woody peel.To cut kohlrabi into strips, first slice it crosswise into one-quarter-inch-thick slices, then cut the slices lengthwise.
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By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2004
Theresa O'Hara of Baltimore wanted a recipe for a Cranberry Cake that she used to make. It was baked in a bundt pan and drizzled with a thin icing. Alice Flumbaum from Joppa sent in a recipe her daughter, Rebecca Lowery, makes called a Cape Cod Cranberry-Nut Cake. She says the rich, moist cake has been a standard part of her family's Christmas brunch for many years. The cake has a wonderful delicate flavor and texture and the cranberry swirl adds a lovely holiday touch. It would be a hit any time of year but it does seem like a natural for Christmas morning.
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FEATURES
November 7, 1990
Brickle Bars1/2 cup margarine or butter2 squares (2 ounces) unsweetened chocolate1 cup sugar2 eggs1 teaspoon vanilla3/4 cup all-purpose flour3/4 cup almond brickle pieces1/2 cup miniature semisweet chocolate piecesIn a two-quart saucepan cook and stir margarine or butter and unsweetened chocolate over low heat until melted. Remove from heat; stir in sugar. Add eggs and vanilla; beat lightly with a wooden spoon just until combined. Don't overbeat or brownies will rise too high, then fall. Stir in flour.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2004
Joy R. Dion of Northampton, Mass., says she has been searching for years for a recipe her mother made called Peach Pizza. "I don't know if it is an Italian recipe or not but it was made in a pizza pan. I don't really know the ingredients or what time it was in the oven. It evokes fond memories and I would be so appreciative if you could find the recipe for me." Jeannie Armstrong of Dayton, Md., responded with tester Laura Reiley's choice. She wrote: "Joy R. Dion was looking for a peach pizza recipe.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | March 27, 1991
When your schedule demands fast-cooking foods, remember boneless chicken breasts. With the bone already removed, they're flat enough to cook in minutes, whether you're grilling, poaching, steaming, broiling or cooking in the microwave oven.Add a dab of butter or non-stick spray coating, and low-fat chicken breasts are great for skillet-cooking, too, as in the spicy recipe below. For a hotter sauce, you can add one-quarter teaspoon ground red pepper.Indian Chicken and Rice1/2 cup long grain rice3 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves (about 8 ounces)
FEATURES
By SEATTLE TIMES | March 27, 1996
The following light recipe is from "Great Feasts without Fuss" by Frances McCullough and Barbara Witt.Baked pears with ginger preserves and biscotti6 servings3 medium Bosc pears, ripe without being mushy1 teaspoon margarine or butter1/4 cup ginger preserves (see note)1/2 cup apple juice2 tablespoons lemon juice2 tablespoons raw brown (turbinado) sugar, or light brown sugarstore-bought or homemade biscottiHeat oven to 400 degrees. Cut the pears in half lengthwise. (It is not necessary to peel or remove the stem.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better homes and Gardens Magazine | April 24, 1991
Rice that's already cooked can be speedily reheated in the microwave. The next time you have leftover rice, think of this colorful and fast microwave fix up. Stir in a little water with the rice and it will turn out moist and fluffy.Rice needs time to absorb water, whether cooked on the range or in a microwave.Spanish Rice1 large green pepper, coarsely chopped1 large tomato, coarsely chopped1 medium onion, chopped2 tablespoons margarine or butter2 cups cooked rice1/3 cup water1/2 teaspoon salt1/4 teaspoon pepperIn a one-quart microwave-safe casserole combine green pepper, tomato, onion and margarine or butter.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL AND JANE STERN | May 26, 1991
MADISON, Ga.-- We're not exactly certain how Ye Olde Colonial Restaurant got its name; there is nothing obviously Colonial about this popular town cafe on the square in the Georgia town of Madison. It is located in a vintage bank building with a beautiful interior of wood-paneled walls and flocked red wallpaper, and its high arched windows provide a view of the street outside. Meals are casual and inexpensive, eaten in booths and at round tables in the center of the room, each of which is set with a large pitcher of presweetened iced tea so customers can help themselves.
FEATURES
By Sherrie Clinton and Sherrie Clinton,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1990
SURPRISE YOUR LITTLE goblins with these soft, chewy cookies. Each delicious cookie has a treat inside: a melted peanut butter cup. The cookies are simple to make because you only need two ingredients.Peanut Butter Surprise1 refrigerator roll of sugar or peanut butter "slice and bake" cookies36 miniature peanut butter cup candiesCut dough into nine equal slices; cut each slice into fourths. Put one piece in each muffin cup of greased miniature muffin tins. Bake at 375 degrees for ten minutes.
FEATURES
By Linda Cicero and Linda Cicero,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | January 30, 1991
Quiche kind of disappeared from our consciousness after to much exposure in the late '70s, coupled with dire warnings from the cholesterol cops in the '80s, placed it on the "What's Out" lists.But this quiche is so quick and easy that its a true comeback contender in the '90s.1! Italian Zucchini Crescent Pie4 cups thinly sliced, unpeeled zucchini1 cup coarsely chopped onion1/2 cup margarine or butter1/2 cup chopped parsley or 2 tablespoons parsley flakes1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon black pepper1/2 teaspoon garlic powder1/4 teaspoon basil leaves1/4 teaspoon oregano leaves2 eggs, well beaten8 ounces (2 cups)
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 8, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Gather the family for your own or store-bought roast turkey breast.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | December 17, 2000
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Make mealtime easier during a busy holiday time and buy a spiral-sliced ham for the family.
FEATURES
By SEATTLE TIMES | March 27, 1996
The following light recipe is from "Great Feasts without Fuss" by Frances McCullough and Barbara Witt.Baked pears with ginger preserves and biscotti6 servings3 medium Bosc pears, ripe without being mushy1 teaspoon margarine or butter1/4 cup ginger preserves (see note)1/2 cup apple juice2 tablespoons lemon juice2 tablespoons raw brown (turbinado) sugar, or light brown sugarstore-bought or homemade biscottiHeat oven to 400 degrees. Cut the pears in half lengthwise. (It is not necessary to peel or remove the stem.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | March 27, 1994
Easter's message at start of spring is very sweetEaster is a serious holiday, but it has a less-serious component that is probably as old as mankind: the welcoming of spring. The colored eggs and bunnies and chocolate bars and jelly beans and other cuddly and calorie-laden things so dear to the hearts of children are part of this aspect. Here's a roundup of some treats to help youngsters and adults make a sweet transition from winter's doldrums.Hot cross biscuits can be made so easily you may want to have them all yearHot cross buns are a treat associated with Good Friday, the Friday before Easter Sunday.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | December 22, 1993
Happy times are here, and this Happy Day Cake will add to the pleasure. Blanche G. Wahl of Baltimore had asked for this yellow layer cake recipe, which she wrote "appeared on probably a box of Swans Down cake flour about 25 or 30 years ago."Also, when Kathryn Corbet wrote from Mexico that she lost her recipefor a yeast bread made in a casserole, using cottage cheese and dill, she possibly didn't know she had requested a real winner. In 1960, the $25,000 Pillsbury Bake-Off's classic grand prize recipe, Dilly Casserole Bread, was won by Leona P. Schnuelle of Beatrice, Neb.Answers poured in for Ms. Corbet, including one from Linda Davis-O'Brien of St. Michaels that she says is included in her cookbook titled "As Good As Gold, Grand Prize Recipes from America's Cooking Contests."
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
When either of these two recipes are baking, the aroma is guaranteed to be a taste teaser. Debbie Bailey of Salisbury answered the request of Ida Hamilton of Baltimore who wanted a fruitcake recipe calling for more nuts than fruit. And Rheba Berbes of Baltimore responded to the request of Angela Korista of Reisterstown with a chocolate cheesecake brownie recipe.Bailey's fruitcake1 cup sugar1 pound butter or margarine5 eggs1 ounce each vanilla and lemon extracts1 pound candied pineapple3/4 pound candied cherries4 cups pecans2 cups flourCream sugar and butter.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | April 8, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Gather the family for your own or store-bought roast turkey breast.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2004
Theresa O'Hara of Baltimore wanted a recipe for a Cranberry Cake that she used to make. It was baked in a bundt pan and drizzled with a thin icing. Alice Flumbaum from Joppa sent in a recipe her daughter, Rebecca Lowery, makes called a Cape Cod Cranberry-Nut Cake. She says the rich, moist cake has been a standard part of her family's Christmas brunch for many years. The cake has a wonderful delicate flavor and texture and the cranberry swirl adds a lovely holiday touch. It would be a hit any time of year but it does seem like a natural for Christmas morning.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | August 28, 1991
Thanks to your microwave oven, you can make trying new vegetables, such as kohlrabi, quicker and easier than ever. This sweet and lemony side dish is ready for sampling in less than 10 minutes.In case you're wondering, kohlrabi is a round vegetable that tastes like a cross between a cabbage and a turnip. How do you prepare it? Cut off the top, then use a sharp knife to pull off the strips of woody peel.To cut kohlrabi into strips, first slice it crosswise into one-quarter-inch-thick slices, then cut the slices lengthwise.
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