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By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,Contributing Writer | August 18, 1993
A: When recently making my tried-and-true poundcake recipe, I decided to try it with corn-oil margarine rather than the butter I usually use. When serving the cake, I discovered a puddle of grease or oil on the doily. What caused this?A: If margarine can be used to replace butter in a recipe, the recipe will usually say either can be used. If the recipe doesn't mention it as an option when baking, it's best to use exactly the ingredients specified. Reduced-calorie or "light" margarine products, in particular, are never advised as a substitute for butter in baking.
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By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
The Baltimore Health Department fined Ki Jeong $100 last week because the margarine he uses in his Healthy Choice barbeque stand at Lexington Market twice exceeded the limits set by the city's year-old trans fat ban. It was the first enforcement action of the law. But the damages have gone far beyond the fine. "I'm losing customers," he said Tuesday. "When it's publicized on a TV news show, people think I'm still using it [the high-fat margarine]. That's in people's minds, even today.
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By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | March 30, 1993
We all thought we were being so good to reduce our fat intake by switching from butter to margarine. Now a March 1993 study published in the British medical journal, Lancet, indicates that women who eat more than 4 teaspoons of margarine a day are at an increased risk of heart disease.What's a woman to do? To find out, I met with Dr. Ben Caballero, director of the division of Nutrition at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and asked him to answer our questions.*Q. Did we do the wrong thing by switching from butter to margarine?
NEWS
By The Wall Street Journal | April 19, 2008
A shortage of special kosher-for-Passover margarine is causing dismay in Jewish households across the nation as family cooks discover they can't make many of their traditional Passover meals without it. Particularly irksome is the absence of kosher-for-Passover stick margarine, an essential ingredient in baking for the weeklong holiday starting at sundown today. "Margarine-gate, that's what we're calling it," says Rabbi Moshe Elefant, chief operating officer of the kosher division of the Orthodox Union, the leading kosher certification agency.
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By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | July 17, 1992
Sandra Filbert Amos, the heiress to the Mrs. Filbert margarine fortune. was released from prison today after serving 2 1/2 years on drug charges.At 7:50 a.m., U.S. marshals took Amos from the Baltimore County Detention Center in Towson to to the marshal's office in Garmatz Federal Courthouse for processing. She was released about 10 a.m.As Amos walked down Sharp Street a free woman for the first time since her arrest in December 1989, she smiled and said she was happy about her release, She did not comment further.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 16, 1994
TCAn article being published today raises the possibility that margarine and other processed foods could be the cause of 30,000 of the nation's heart disease deaths.The fact that margarine may be a major factor in heart problems is not new. A year ago, researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health announced findings that margarine can increase the risk for heart disease in women by as much as 70 percent. But the numbers in today's American Journal of Public Health article were seen as alarming and came under immediate attack.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 7, 1992
NEW YORK -- The U.S. Agriculture Department, in an unpublished study, has found that fat in margarine may contribute to heart disease.In response to harsh criticism in the past few years about the amount of saturated fat in the American diet, many food manufacturers have reluctantly switched from tropical to partially hydrogenated vegetable oils made from soybean and corn oils.Now new data show these oils -- found in margarine, vegetable shortening and a host of products ranging from doughnuts to cookies and crackers -- may also be hazardous.
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By Seattle Times | January 8, 1992
This tasty recipe will make weekend breakfast or brunch a treat.Baked French Toast8-ounce carton egg substitute, defrosted if frozen1/3 cup low-fat milk1/4 teaspoon cinnamon and nutmeg6 slices white bread1 tablespoon margarine, meltedWhisk together all ingredients but bread and margarine.Put bread slices into 9x13-inch pan. Pour egg mixture over bread and let sit for 20 minutes.Brush baking sheet with about half melted margarine. Arrange soaked bread on sheet and drizzle with remaining margarine.
FEATURES
April 3, 1991
Crunchy Trail Snack Bars are an after-school treat that take just minutes to make in your microwave oven. You can also pack them for lunches, hiking trips and picnics. They are made with marshmallows, rice cereal, granola and raisins.Trail Snack Bars1/4 cup margarine3 cups miniature marshmallows3 cups crisp rice cereal2 cups granola1 cup raisinsCook margarine in a large microwave-safe bowl on high (100 percent power) for 45 seconds or until melted. Add marshmallows; toss to coat with margarine.
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By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | October 13, 1992
Are you mystified by the margarine maelstrom? Confused about which fats to eat and which to avoid? Ready to throw in the towel on nutrition generally?Relax, and try to hang in there. The old rule still applies. Eat less fat of all kinds.Last week, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a report concluding that trans fatty acids are similar to saturated fats in raising blood cholesterol levels, and in some cases, lowering HDL, or good cholesterol.Trans fatty acids are the result of "hydrogenation," or adding hydrogen molecules to a liquid fat, like corn oil or safflower oil, to make it a little more solid, like margarine, which we've substituted for butter, a saturated fat, in order to get our blood cholesterol levels down.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR, FRANK D. ROYLANCE AND DAN THANH DANG and JONATHAN BOR, FRANK D. ROYLANCE AND DAN THANH DANG,SUN REPORTERS | February 9, 2006
Confused by this week's news that a low-fat diet might not help prevent cancer and heart disease after all? Beth Hobson was. "I've been on a low-fat diet for four years now," said the 44-year-old part-time worker at a fitness center in Pasadena. "Does that mean I can go back to eating full saturated fats? I should go home and eat a pizza tonight?" By no means, scientists said yesterday. The real culprits in our diets, they say, are the hardened fats in margarine and shortening, as well as saturated fats in meat.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | May 15, 2002
To fully appreciate boutique butters, you have to feel that margarine is an abomination of nature. You have to abhor the concept of light butter. And as for low-fat pastries - well, life wouldn't be worth living if you had to eat those, would it? Maybe you've noticed these new, richer butters on your supermarket shelves. You can recognize them by labels like "European-style" and "extra creamy," by the fancy packaging (often foil) and, most of all, by their price tag. They typically cost twice as much as ordinary butters.
FEATURES
By Beverly Bundy and Beverly Bundy,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 16, 2002
Butter? Margarine? Butter! Consumers have been slowly but surely oozing their way back to butter over the past seven years or so. It's not a huge jump, but the category is steadily growing at about 6 percent a year, with Americans now consuming about 4.3 pounds per person a year. After the scared-of-your-dinner 1980s, this increase is a good sign to dairy farmers, who've watched their countrymen gobble up margarine and other spreads while ignoring the once-golden butter. But butter consumption is still a long way from what it once was. "There was a time in this country," says Al Costigan, the president of the American Butter Institute, a trade group for dairy farmers and marketers, "that Americans each ate about 16 pounds of butter a year."
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | February 2, 2000
Nola J. Custis of Scotland, S.D., requested a recipe for Spinach Strudel using phyllo dough. Tester Laura Reiley chose a response that was submitted without a name. Spinach Strudel Serves 6 as an appetizer 8 ounces fresh spinach 1 tablespoon margarine plus 3 additional tablespoons margarine, melted 6 green onions, with tops, chopped 8 sheets phyllo dough 1 1/2 ounces feta cheese 1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste 1 tablespoon honey Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
FEATURES
September 8, 1999
Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars make a sweet addition to a child's lunch box. Kids can help make the bars by stirring in the peanut-butter chips or spreading the jelly. Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars Peanut Butter and Jelly Bars Makes 16 bars 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1/2 cup sugar 3/4 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 cup (1 stick) cold butter or margarine 1 egg, beaten 3/4 cup grape jelly 1 2/3 cup peanut-butter chips Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 25, 1998
AKRON, Ohio -- We don't care about the federal government's new weight guidelines.We don't care about our cholesterol levels.We want taste.But are we willing to pay for it? Not just in pounds, but in cash?The price of butterfat, the part of milk that puts the taste in dairy products, will reach an all-time high this summer, experts predict. That will drive up the price of cheese, chocolate and ice cream.Economists predict that higher butterfat prices will drive the cost of a pound of butter up to $3 at the grocery store by late summer; it has been about $2 for most of the year.
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | February 2, 2000
Nola J. Custis of Scotland, S.D., requested a recipe for Spinach Strudel using phyllo dough. Tester Laura Reiley chose a response that was submitted without a name. Spinach Strudel Serves 6 as an appetizer 8 ounces fresh spinach 1 tablespoon margarine plus 3 additional tablespoons margarine, melted 6 green onions, with tops, chopped 8 sheets phyllo dough 1 1/2 ounces feta cheese 1/2 teaspoon caraway seeds 1/4 teaspoon black pepper, or to taste 1 tablespoon honey Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | October 26, 2010
The Baltimore Health Department fined Ki Jeong $100 last week because the margarine he uses in his Healthy Choice barbeque stand at Lexington Market twice exceeded the limits set by the city's year-old trans fat ban. It was the first enforcement action of the law. But the damages have gone far beyond the fine. "I'm losing customers," he said Tuesday. "When it's publicized on a TV news show, people think I'm still using it [the high-fat margarine]. That's in people's minds, even today.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1997
When it comes to meatballs and cake, these two requests will offer you a snicker and an aloha.Tanya Floam of Westminster requested a Snickers-bar cake recipe."
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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1997
These skillet dishes make a good choice for breakfast, lunch or a casual supper."At the Hyatt Regency at Gainey Ranch in Phoenix, Ariz., a delicious version of French toast is served which has thick slices of bread and a fruit filling," wrote Jennifer Thom of Sioux Falls, S.D.Pam H. Gates of Fayetteville, N.C., responded.Strawberry French toast sandwichesMakes 6 sandwiches1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons soft cream cheese12 slices sandwich bread3 tablespoons strawberry jam3 eggs3 tablespoons milk1/8 teaspoon salt2 or more tablespoons margarineconfectioners' sugar for garnishfresh strawberries for garnishSpread 1 tablespoon cream cheese on each of 6 bread slices.
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