Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMargaret Thatcher
IN THE NEWS

Margaret Thatcher

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 26, 2013
Columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. couldn't be more wrong when he describes the late British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher as "a woman of principle and strong moral character" ("A silence from liberals that speaks volumes," June 23). On the contrary, Mrs. Thatcher's hatred of Irish Catholics caused her to commit war crimes in Northern Ireland for which she should have been tried at the Hague. Thatcher sent British SAS soldiers to Northern Ireland with orders to "shoot to kill," ordered the execution of Catholic lawyer Pat Finucane, whose only offense was to defend suspected IRA members too well in court, and once horrified her advisors by proposing a "Cromwell solution" for Northern Ireland - whereby tens of thousands of Catholics would be forcibly removed (ethnically cleansed)
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 26, 2013
Columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. couldn't be more wrong when he describes the late British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher as "a woman of principle and strong moral character" ("A silence from liberals that speaks volumes," June 23). On the contrary, Mrs. Thatcher's hatred of Irish Catholics caused her to commit war crimes in Northern Ireland for which she should have been tried at the Hague. Thatcher sent British SAS soldiers to Northern Ireland with orders to "shoot to kill," ordered the execution of Catholic lawyer Pat Finucane, whose only offense was to defend suspected IRA members too well in court, and once horrified her advisors by proposing a "Cromwell solution" for Northern Ireland - whereby tens of thousands of Catholics would be forcibly removed (ethnically cleansed)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | January 12, 2012
Two items have recently burst onto the media scene: a movie called "The Iron Lady" about one of the greatest women in history - former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher - and a growing European recall of breast implants in danger of exploding. I wonder what the former would say about the latter. Did it ever cross Ms. Thatcher's mind that women's lives could be meaningfully enhanced by surgically strapping gel packs to their chests? How did women get from Margaret Thatcher to this?
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 23, 2013
Are you easily annoyed these days? Me too. So, herewith, a brief sampling of the most annoying and shamelessly under-analyzed and under-reported incidents of recent weeks. • Democratic silence as President Barack Obama follows and expands upon Bush Administration terror-war policies . Liberals in Congress and the media cried bloody murder (and worse) when the Bush Administration began (warrantless) eavesdropping on domestic communications and indeterminate detention of suspected terrorists.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 10, 2013
In 1975, when asked to explain why Margaret Thatcher was poised to take over the Tory Party, the irascible British satirist Malcolm Muggeridge replied that it was all due to television - and the fact that the telegenic Mrs. Thatcher had a "certain imbecile charm. " That was one of the nicer things said about an "imbecile" who earned a degree in chemistry from Oxford and became a lawyer while studying at home. (She sent her bar application from the maternity ward while recovering from delivering twins.)
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 23, 2013
Are you easily annoyed these days? Me too. So, herewith, a brief sampling of the most annoying and shamelessly under-analyzed and under-reported incidents of recent weeks. • Democratic silence as President Barack Obama follows and expands upon Bush Administration terror-war policies . Liberals in Congress and the media cried bloody murder (and worse) when the Bush Administration began (warrantless) eavesdropping on domestic communications and indeterminate detention of suspected terrorists.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
The faces in the deeply affecting British film "Brassed Off" are arresting. Close camera shots focus on bulbous, red noses, floppy ears, heavy brows and wet, runny eyes.They are homely faces, and one of this endearing film's achievements is that they quickly become dear, too, like the faces of friends, which you no longer consider as handsome or not. They are simply welcome.The faces in "Brassed Off" are weary and drawn. They belong to coal miners in the dreary, fictitious town of Grimley nearly a decade ago. Like many real Yorkshire cities of that time, the town is threatened by Margaret Thatcher's Tory government, which aims to close the coal pit though it remains profitable and vital to Grimley's survival.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 15, 1990
After 11 docile years, the Tory chaps mustered the courage to take on Margaret Thatcher.A lot of the members of Congress want to regularize the gulf situation by declaring war. Then we'd be at war. Now we're not.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2006
A Scottish chef carves up his boss, Duncan, king of the celebrity restaurateurs. A cross-dressing aristocrat tames a shrew aiming to become the next Margaret Thatcher. On TV ShakespeaRe-Told: Much Ado About Nothing airs at 7 p.m. tomorrow on BBC America. The other three adaptations are shown at the same time on consecutive Sundays.
NEWS
November 29, 1990
England's great 19th century novelist Charles Dickens had a penchant for choosing names to suit the character of the individuals he created -- Mrs. Micawber is a good example -- and we suspect that if he were around today and could have chosen a name for the British prime minister to succeed Margaret Thatcher, that name might have been John Major.The military rank of major is a mid-level slot held by people usually in their mid-40s -- as John Major is. Only a few years ago Major was just a bright and promising young officer in the Conservative corps that the redoubtable Margaret Thatcher had assembled.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
Regarding the recent article, "Argentine leader not on list for Thatcher funeral" (April 12), it seems logical that to me Great Britain did not invite Cristina Fernandez, the president of Argentina to Margaret Thatcher's funeral. The news item, however, labels this "a snub likely to deepen a diplomatic dispute over the Falkland Islands. " This is a perfect example of how the daily news media misleads the public. In fact, President Fernandez is actively encouraging the newly appointed Pope Francis, a fellow countrymen and ironically her former political enemy, to stir up the whole Falkland Islands dispute with the United Kingdom all over again.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 10, 2013
In 1975, when asked to explain why Margaret Thatcher was poised to take over the Tory Party, the irascible British satirist Malcolm Muggeridge replied that it was all due to television - and the fact that the telegenic Mrs. Thatcher had a "certain imbecile charm. " That was one of the nicer things said about an "imbecile" who earned a degree in chemistry from Oxford and became a lawyer while studying at home. (She sent her bar application from the maternity ward while recovering from delivering twins.)
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | January 12, 2012
Two items have recently burst onto the media scene: a movie called "The Iron Lady" about one of the greatest women in history - former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher - and a growing European recall of breast implants in danger of exploding. I wonder what the former would say about the latter. Did it ever cross Ms. Thatcher's mind that women's lives could be meaningfully enhanced by surgically strapping gel packs to their chests? How did women get from Margaret Thatcher to this?
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | January 24, 2007
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Fundraisers on the left and right are salivating now that Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton has declared, "I'm in" the 2008 presidential race. On the left, feminists will likely hail her as the reincarnation of suffragette Susan B. Anthony. On the right, conservatives will portray her as a cross between Lady Macbeth and Bonnie Parker. Conservatives should be careful. The nonstop attacks on Bill Clinton did not keep him from winning in 1992, nor did his personal scandals prevent his re-election four years later.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | September 3, 2006
Let's all let incoming PepsiCo Inc. Chief Executive Officer Indra Nooyi do her job when she steps into that position next month. Easy on the breakfast, luncheon, dinner, commencement and award ceremony speeches. Hold the puffery about her being in an all-girl rock band in college. Don't ask her to tell jokes to prove her quick wit. Be judicious in magazine covers. Just let her be a CEO, not a public relations juggernaut. A role model, yes, a figurehead, no. Don't force her to become the public successor to Carleton S. "Carly" Fiorina, shoved out as Hewlett-Packard Co. boss last year after a high-profile tenure in which she was relentlessly presented as the face of women in the executive suite.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 30, 2006
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- British Prime Minister Tony Blair returns from a late-summer vacation in Barbados with his ruling Labor Party approval rating at a 19-year low of 31 percent. Conservatives, under new leader David Cameron, enjoy 40 percent approval, according to the latest Guardian/ICM Poll. Seeking to take advantage of Mr. Blair's troubles and their popularity surge, the Tories last week borrowed a page from what now seems like an ancient Republican Party playbook, publishing a type of "contract with Britain."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | April 5, 1992
LONDON -- When Prime Minister John Major warned of a "Nightmare on Kinnock Street" should the Labor Party be elected Thursday, he was following the successful strategy used by the Conservatives under Margaret Thatcher in 1987:Attack Neil Kinnock personally, scare everybody by describing the disarray of Britain under previous Labor governments and suggest that it could all come back, like Freddy Krueger.The strategy hasn't varied since the start of the campaign March 11, but there is something amiss.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 23, 1990
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- President Bush acknowledged yesterday that he lost a "staunch friend" and "outstanding ally" when Margaret Thatcher bowed out as British prime minister.Speaking to reporters in a bunker near a U.S. Marine installation in the Saudi desert, the president said he was confident that British support of the effort to drive Iraqi forces from Kuwait would continue under Mrs. Thatcher's successor."But on a personal basis, I'll miss her," Mr. Bush said. "She's a woman of principle.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 5, 2006
A Scottish chef carves up his boss, Duncan, king of the celebrity restaurateurs. A cross-dressing aristocrat tames a shrew aiming to become the next Margaret Thatcher. On TV ShakespeaRe-Told: Much Ado About Nothing airs at 7 p.m. tomorrow on BBC America. The other three adaptations are shown at the same time on consecutive Sundays.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | April 17, 2006
BOSTON -- For those who have ever wondered when a promise of protection becomes a protection racket, this is your moment. We now have the forced admission that in 2003, George W. Bush approved the leaking of classified intelligence gathered before the Iraq war. He didn't let it all leak out. He authorized a trickle of information buttressing his case that Saddam Hussein had been a nuclear threat - information that had been discredited. After manipulating this faucet of fear, the president then defended the war in the name of national security, casting himself as the country's father-protector.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.