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Margaret Mitchell

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By New York Times News Service | December 18, 1994
ATLANTA -- It has been home to a famous novelist and to vagrants, burned by an arsonist, exploited for obscure artistic purposes -- and generally reviled by Atlantans.But now the dilapidated, charred ruin where Margaret Mitchell wrote most of "Gone With the Wind" is about to be restored to turn-of-the-century glory by a German industrial company.Daimler-Benz AG of Stuttgart, Germany, maker of Mercedes-Benz automobiles, said this month that it has approached the site's current owner, an Atlanta developer, with a plan to buy and restore the building before the 1996 Olympic Games.
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NEWS
June 25, 2006
On June 23, 2006, HOWARD CHARLES ERBE, of Sykesville; beloved husband of Mildred B. Erbe; devoted father of Roger Erbe and his wife Mary Beth and Lucinda Moen and her husband Claude, dear stepfather of William J. Murphy Jr., and his wife Verna and Sue Bailey and her companion Al De Santis, dear brother of Bruce Erbe, Catherine Schmidt, Margaret Mitchell, Patricia Gotschall, the late George Erbe and the late Carolyn Cline; also survived by 11 grandchildren and...
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FEATURES
By Theo Lippman JR. and Theo Lippman JR.,Special to the sun | August 9, 1998
The re-release of the movie "Gone With the Wind" this summer prompted a new round of criticism of the movie, of the novel it is based on and of its author, Margaret Mitchell. Those criticisms include the sort she most resented when her book was published in 1936. They probably have her spinning in her grave today.For example, one journalist wrote of "GWTW" last June that it is "Southern myth." And continued, "Historians say fact is the loser." For another example, one of my favorite columnists got off one of his best cracks at her expense: "She probably learned her history by reading the back of an Aunt Jemima pancake box."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,Sun Staff | August 1, 2004
Though Mitchell's Tailors changed hands in late June, though the boiler in the basement is silent and the steam press is waiting for the new owner to fire it up again, Rufus N. Mitchell has returned to the shop at least once a week. Mitchell, who, along with his wife, Margaret Mitchell, owned the business at 414 Wilson St. for 55 years, couldn't stay away entirely. But after 55 years, who could? Mitchell drove back to the shop in Druid Hill from his home in Baltimore County one day when he realized he had left some old family photographs on the wall.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991
Coinciding with the publication of "Scarlett: The Sequel to Margaret Mitchell's 'Gone With The Wind,' " a restored print of the 1939 film classic, "Gone With the Wind," is showing at the Senator Theatre through Oct. 2.On Oct. 3, the Senator marks its 52nd anniversary by rolling admission prices back to 25 cents -- the 1939 rate -- for "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington." Concession items will also be offered for 25 cents.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | September 26, 1991
It may never measure up to the original, but that didn't keep "Scarlett: The Sequel to Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind" from flying out of local bookstores yesterday.At the Towson bookstore Greetings & Readings, first-day sales of the 823-page tome (suggested retail: $24.95) were "fabulous," according to salesperson Jean Duerr. By yesterday afternoon the store had sold out of its first shipment of 150 books; another is expected tomorrow.Similarly, Jo Blankenburg, manager of Waldenbooks in Towson Town Center, was finding it impossible to keep up with customer demand for the books.
FEATURES
September 27, 1991
Alexandra Ripley agreed not to include mixed-race sex in "Scarlett: The Sequel to Margaret Mitchell's 'Gone With the Wind'" in order to land the $5 million writing contract. At a New York book store where she signed 334 copies of the book in two hours, Ripley said Thursday: "The lawyers for the Margaret Mitchell estate -- three men in their 70s -- were looking for specific things that would upset them, that they would consider in bad taste, and graphic sex, homosexuality and miscegenation were the things.
FEATURES
By Newsday | September 25, 1991
WARNER BOOKS, publisher of "Scarlett: The Sequel to Margaret Mitchell's 'Gone With the Wind,' " is spending $600,000 on publicity and publishing 900,000 copies.To maintain the suspense of what happens to Rhett Butler and Scarlett O'Hara, no store could display the book until today. No reviewer or writer saw the book before Saturday (when it was delivered to homes, for added privacy), and they hadto promise not to print anything until today. The only foretaste was an excerpt in Life last month that left off with Scarlett pregnant by Rhett and Rhett married to another woman.
NEWS
June 25, 2006
On June 23, 2006, HOWARD CHARLES ERBE, of Sykesville; beloved husband of Mildred B. Erbe; devoted father of Roger Erbe and his wife Mary Beth and Lucinda Moen and her husband Claude, dear stepfather of William J. Murphy Jr., and his wife Verna and Sue Bailey and her companion Al De Santis, dear brother of Bruce Erbe, Catherine Schmidt, Margaret Mitchell, Patricia Gotschall, the late George Erbe and the late Carolyn Cline; also survived by 11 grandchildren and...
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | March 22, 2003
FOR YEARS I've heard little components of a story I promised to myself I'd try to nail down around the time of the Academy Awards ceremony. It surrounds Margaret Mitchell, the author of the novel Gone With the Wind, which, of course, became the basis of the celebrated film. It also concerns our Sisters of Mercy, the Roman Catholic order so well-known in Baltimore. I've always been fascinated by Mitchell, who died in 1949 after being hit by a Peachtree Street taxicab in Atlanta. My mother always warned me as a child that I would wind up like Margaret - she had spotted my careless, daydreaming style while crossing streets.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | March 22, 2003
FOR YEARS I've heard little components of a story I promised to myself I'd try to nail down around the time of the Academy Awards ceremony. It surrounds Margaret Mitchell, the author of the novel Gone With the Wind, which, of course, became the basis of the celebrated film. It also concerns our Sisters of Mercy, the Roman Catholic order so well-known in Baltimore. I've always been fascinated by Mitchell, who died in 1949 after being hit by a Peachtree Street taxicab in Atlanta. My mother always warned me as a child that I would wind up like Margaret - she had spotted my careless, daydreaming style while crossing streets.
FEATURES
By Nancy Pate and Nancy Pate,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 4, 2001
ORLANDO - The woman sitting cross-legged in the lobby of an Orlando Hotel waving her arms like a small, busy windmill and debating the merits of Jane Austen's Mansfield Park is the Alice Randall who has a degree in English from Harvard University. It's the same Alice Randall who co-wrote the Trisha Yearwood hit "XXX's and OOO's (An American Girl)" with fellow Nashville songwriter Matraca Berg. And it's the same Alice Randall who created so much controversy this year when the estate of Margaret Mitchell sued to block publication of a parody Randall wrote called The Wind Done Gone.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2000
In New Hampshire, the faithful still show up at the edges of J.D. Salinger's property, no matter how many damning memoirs are written about him. In the Florida Keys, normally blase journalists become ga-ga over the prospect of bone-fishing with Carl Hiaasen. And in Oxford, Miss., so many fans found their way to the home of John Grisham that he finally pulled up stakes and moved to Charlottesville, Va. -- allegedly after he awoke one morning and found someone getting married outside his house.
TRAVEL
By Christopher Reynolds and By Christopher Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | August 15, 1999
The South holds plenty of untold stories. One of them is that Margaret Mitchell wrote almost all of "Gone With the Wind," and conjured up the world's most famous plantation house, while dwelling in a cramped apartment on the ground floor of an 1899 Tudor-style urban Atlanta home. She called it "the Dump."Yet Tara, that grand plantation Mitchell built from fantasy in her 1936 novel, stands taller in the American popular imagination than Gatsby's mansion, sturdier than the Little House on the Prairie.
FEATURES
By Theo Lippman JR. and Theo Lippman JR.,Special to the sun | August 9, 1998
The re-release of the movie "Gone With the Wind" this summer prompted a new round of criticism of the movie, of the novel it is based on and of its author, Margaret Mitchell. Those criticisms include the sort she most resented when her book was published in 1936. They probably have her spinning in her grave today.For example, one journalist wrote of "GWTW" last June that it is "Southern myth." And continued, "Historians say fact is the loser." For another example, one of my favorite columnists got off one of his best cracks at her expense: "She probably learned her history by reading the back of an Aunt Jemima pancake box."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | June 27, 1998
THERE ARE basically two types of Americans. There are those who positively adore "Gone With The Wind," the 1939 classic starring Clark Gable, Clark Gable's ears, Vivien Leigh, Hattie McDaniel and Butterfly McQueen, the latter in a role that made me seriously consider changing my ethnic designation to Hispanic.And then there are those of us who despise the just re-released film. Film-hating makes for strange bedfellows. I am now in the uncomfortable position of agreeing with WOLB-radio talk show host C. Miles on this one. In fact, we are in so much accord that the only point on which we could disagree is which one of us hates the film more.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | November 7, 1994
Viewers who can't wait for "Scarlett" on CBS this weekend can tune in tonight to see NBC's "A Burning Passion: The Margaret Mitchell Story." This new TV biography of the "Gone With the Wind" author has much in common with the "Wind" sequel beginning Sunday. For example, neither one was written or approved by Mitchell herself. The highlight on the schedule, though, is Nickelodeon, where you should park and keep the meter running: It's an all-night marathon of "Taxi" episodes.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11)
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | September 25, 1991
At last tomorrow is here for Scarlett O'Hara.Last seen 55 years ago in a heap at the bottom of the stairs, her faithless husband Rhett's "My dear, I don't give a damn" ringing in her ears, Scarlett was vowing to think about it all tomorrow.Today tomorrow has arrived, with Warner Books' release of "Scarlett: The Sequel to Margaret Mitchell's Gone With the Wind."And for GWTW fans who can't wait to read the 823-page opus (priced at $24.95) by Southern romance novelist Alexandra Ripley, we can tell you what happens -- thanks to an advance copy provided by the publisher:* Mammy dies.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 18, 1994
ATLANTA -- It has been home to a famous novelist and to vagrants, burned by an arsonist, exploited for obscure artistic purposes -- and generally reviled by Atlantans.But now the dilapidated, charred ruin where Margaret Mitchell wrote most of "Gone With the Wind" is about to be restored to turn-of-the-century glory by a German industrial company.Daimler-Benz AG of Stuttgart, Germany, maker of Mercedes-Benz automobiles, said this month that it has approached the site's current owner, an Atlanta developer, with a plan to buy and restore the building before the 1996 Olympic Games.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | November 7, 1994
Viewers who can't wait for "Scarlett" on CBS this weekend can tune in tonight to see NBC's "A Burning Passion: The Margaret Mitchell Story." This new TV biography of the "Gone With the Wind" author has much in common with the "Wind" sequel beginning Sunday. For example, neither one was written or approved by Mitchell herself. The highlight on the schedule, though, is Nickelodeon, where you should park and keep the meter running: It's an all-night marathon of "Taxi" episodes.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., Channel 11)
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