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By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The towering height that helped 20-year-old Isaiah Austin shoot to the top ranks of the NBA draft this year also was a symptom of the genetic disorder that, less than one month ago, ended his pro career before it began. But the 7-foot-1-inch Baylor University student counts himself lucky - at least it didn't end his life. Austin learned he has Marfan syndrome thanks to a blood test administered during the NBA draft process. Sometimes the diagnosis of the connective tissue disorder - which can cause the aorta, the main vessel that carries blood from the heart, to grow until it bursts - comes too late.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2014
The towering height that helped 20-year-old Isaiah Austin shoot to the top ranks of the NBA draft this year also was a symptom of the genetic disorder that, less than one month ago, ended his pro career before it began. But the 7-foot-1-inch Baylor University student counts himself lucky - at least it didn't end his life. Austin learned he has Marfan syndrome thanks to a blood test administered during the NBA draft process. Sometimes the diagnosis of the connective tissue disorder - which can cause the aorta, the main vessel that carries blood from the heart, to grow until it bursts - comes too late.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | July 25, 1991
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University and the Shriners Hospital in Portland, Ore., have identified the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome, a discovery that has spawned a test capable of diagnosing the disorder before deadly symptoms appear.A cure might still be many years off, but the discovery could save lives, since it offers patients the chance of diagnosis early in life and treatment -- such as drugs or surgery -- to prevent or delay fatal complications.Within a year, scientists predict, a prospective parent whose family has been plagued by Marfan will be able to get a prenatal diagnosis.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
A half-century after a Johns Hopkins physician first described symptoms of Marfan syndrome, researchers there are planning a clinical trial of a drug that prevented a fatal complication in mice. The condition, which strikes more than 30,000 Americans, weakens the body's connective tissues, making victims unusually tall and lanky but also prone to fatal ruptures of the aorta, the artery that carries blood exiting the heart. Today's edition of the journal Science carries hopeful news that a common hypertension drug prevented aortic weakening in mice and restored the aortas to their normal size.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 25, 1991
Discovery of the Marfan syndrome gene, whose existence was predicted 35 years ago by Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins cardiologist, is reported in today's issue of Nature, a British journal.Scientists from Johns Hopkins and the Portland (Ore.) Shriners Hospital have proved that the gene responsible for making a connective tissue protein causes the syndrome, a potentially fatal, inherited disorder affecting one in 10,000 Americans, the journal reports.The tall and long-armed Abraham Lincoln is believed to have had it. Olympic volleyball player Flo Hyman and University of Maryland basketball player Chris Patton died of it when their aortas -- the heart's major blood vessel -- burst despite apparently excellent health.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 26, 1991
Because of a production error, significant portions of this article were omitted in yesterday's final edition. It is reprinted her for clarity. Discovery of the Marfan syndrome gene, whose existence was predicted 35 years ago by Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins cardiologist, is reported in the current issue of Nature, a British journal.Scientists from Johns Hopkins and the Portland (Ore.) Shriners Hospital have proved that the gene responsible for making a connective tissue protein causes the syndrome, a potentially fatal, inherited disorder affecting one in 10,000 Americans, the journal reports.
NEWS
By New York Times | May 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- There are no compelling legal or ethical reasons to bar an attempt to clone Abraham Lincoln's genes from tissue samples obtained at the time of his assassination, a panel of experts has concluded.The committee, assembled by the government museum that holds samples of Lincoln's tissue, said yesterday that it considered issues of privacy, probable consent, ethics and law -- and gave the proposal a "qualified green light."The nine-member panel, headed by Dr. Victor A. McKusick, professor of medical genetics at Johns Hopkins University, concluded that there was merit in the proposal to see if Lincoln suffered from a potentially fatal genetic disease called Marfan syndrome, which is characterized in part by a tall, gangling appearance.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson and Mary Knudson,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In what could be a precedent-setting decision leading to new knowledge about men and women of history, an expert panel tentatively gave approval yesterday to probing bits of Abraham Lincoln's remains to resolve a medical debate over whether he had the genetic condition called Marfan syndrome.The announcement to the press was made in the Lincoln Room of Sen. Mark O. Hatfield's office in the Hart Senate Office Building, a room lined with portraits of one of history's best-known faces and other Lincoln memorabilia.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A government museum is considering an effort to clone tissue samples from Abraham Lincoln in an attempt to answer persistent questions about his health and how it might have affected his performance as president.The work could set a precedent for examining the genetic material of other historical figures whose tissue has been preserved.A number of museums, special libraries, hospitals and research institutions hold tissue samples from scores of historical figures, RTC including several U.S. presidents, military leaders and politicians.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | May 14, 1991
Q: For nine months I have been on a waiting list for a kidney transplant while being treated for renal failure with hemodialysis. Why does it take so long?A: Delays in the transplantation of kidneys, as well as hearts and livers, are due to a shortage of organs -- a shortage called a public health crisis. Nationwide, more than 18,000 people were waiting for a kidney in February 1991; about 150 are presently on the waiting list in Maryland. The time on the waiting list varies across the country; the average wait is more than a year but may be as long as five years.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1995
Samuel Conigliaro, co-founder of Angelina's Restaurant on Harford Road, died Tuesday of complications from Marfan syndrome at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 81 and lived in Parkville.He and his wife, the former Sarah Russo, whom he married in 1933, opened the S & S Food Market in a rowhouse in the 7100 block of Harford Road in 1934. In 1952, they converted the store into Angelina's.They operated the popular Italian restaurant along with Mr. Conigliaro's brother-in-law, Joseph Tadduni, and his wife, Angelina Tadduni, for whom the restaurant is named.
NEWS
By Jay Merwin and Jay Merwin,Staff Writer | June 27, 1992
It's for the family reunion that actor Vincent Schiavelli keeps coming to National Marfan Foundation meetings."It's really great to see all the genetic family," said Mr. Schiavelli, perhaps best known for his role as the subway derelict in the movie "Ghost.""We all sort of look alike in an odd sort of way, a body crooked, willowing through space," he said after giving the keynote speech yesterday to this year's meeting at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. "We all have the same sort of timbre in our voice.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | December 13, 1991
There is precious little sports journalism on television, so all efforts deserve attention. But by any standard, an ESPN program next week should be worth a viewer's time."
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 26, 1991
Because of a production error, significant portions of this article were omitted in yesterday's final edition. It is reprinted her for clarity. Discovery of the Marfan syndrome gene, whose existence was predicted 35 years ago by Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins cardiologist, is reported in the current issue of Nature, a British journal.Scientists from Johns Hopkins and the Portland (Ore.) Shriners Hospital have proved that the gene responsible for making a connective tissue protein causes the syndrome, a potentially fatal, inherited disorder affecting one in 10,000 Americans, the journal reports.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | July 25, 1991
Discovery of the Marfan syndrome gene, whose existence was predicted 35 years ago by Dr. Victor A. McKusick, a Johns Hopkins cardiologist, is reported in today's issue of Nature, a British journal.Scientists from Johns Hopkins and the Portland (Ore.) Shriners Hospital have proved that the gene responsible for making a connective tissue protein causes the syndrome, a potentially fatal, inherited disorder affecting one in 10,000 Americans, the journal reports.The tall and long-armed Abraham Lincoln is believed to have had it. Olympic volleyball player Flo Hyman and University of Maryland basketball player Chris Patton died of it when their aortas -- the heart's major blood vessel -- burst despite apparently excellent health.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | July 25, 1991
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University and the Shriners Hospital in Portland, Ore., have identified the gene responsible for Marfan syndrome, a discovery that has spawned a test capable of diagnosing the disorder before deadly symptoms appear.A cure might still be many years off, but the discovery could save lives, since it offers patients the chance of diagnosis early in life and treatment -- such as drugs or surgery -- to prevent or delay fatal complications.Within a year, scientists predict, a prospective parent whose family has been plagued by Marfan will be able to get a prenatal diagnosis.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | April 7, 2006
A half-century after a Johns Hopkins physician first described symptoms of Marfan syndrome, researchers there are planning a clinical trial of a drug that prevented a fatal complication in mice. The condition, which strikes more than 30,000 Americans, weakens the body's connective tissues, making victims unusually tall and lanky but also prone to fatal ruptures of the aorta, the artery that carries blood exiting the heart. Today's edition of the journal Science carries hopeful news that a common hypertension drug prevented aortic weakening in mice and restored the aortas to their normal size.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1995
Samuel Conigliaro, co-founder of Angelina's Restaurant on Harford Road, died Tuesday of complications from Marfan syndrome at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 81 and lived in Parkville.He and his wife, the former Sarah Russo, whom he married in 1933, opened the S & S Food Market in a rowhouse in the 7100 block of Harford Road in 1934. In 1952, they converted the store into Angelina's.They operated the popular Italian restaurant along with Mr. Conigliaro's brother-in-law, Joseph Tadduni, and his wife, Angelina Tadduni, for whom the restaurant is named.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis | May 14, 1991
Q: For nine months I have been on a waiting list for a kidney transplant while being treated for renal failure with hemodialysis. Why does it take so long?A: Delays in the transplantation of kidneys, as well as hearts and livers, are due to a shortage of organs -- a shortage called a public health crisis. Nationwide, more than 18,000 people were waiting for a kidney in February 1991; about 150 are presently on the waiting list in Maryland. The time on the waiting list varies across the country; the average wait is more than a year but may be as long as five years.
NEWS
By New York Times | May 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- There are no compelling legal or ethical reasons to bar an attempt to clone Abraham Lincoln's genes from tissue samples obtained at the time of his assassination, a panel of experts has concluded.The committee, assembled by the government museum that holds samples of Lincoln's tissue, said yesterday that it considered issues of privacy, probable consent, ethics and law -- and gave the proposal a "qualified green light."The nine-member panel, headed by Dr. Victor A. McKusick, professor of medical genetics at Johns Hopkins University, concluded that there was merit in the proposal to see if Lincoln suffered from a potentially fatal genetic disease called Marfan syndrome, which is characterized in part by a tall, gangling appearance.
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