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Marcus Garvey

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NEWS
August 15, 1999
Marcus Garvey Gillespie, a father of eight who became a substitute teacher at Woodlawn High School after retiring as a carpenter, died of cancer Monday. He was 72.Mr. Gillespie began his career as a forklift operator at Bethlehem Steel, where he worked for 15 years. The longtime Baltimore resident then worked as a carpenter at both the Liberty and Harbor campuses of Baltimore City Community College before retiring in 1993.He is survived by his wife, Kaye Thompson Gillespie; three sons, Marcus G. Gillespie Jr. and Robert Gillespie, both of Delaware, and Rickey Gillespie of North Carolina; and five daughters, Carolyn Gillespie and Rosina Gillespie, both of Baltimore, and Jacqueline Williams, Lenora White and Sylvia Thomas, all of Delaware.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
When the Rev. Marcus Garvey Wood started his ministry at Providence Baptist Church in Baltimore, President Barack Obama hadn't yet been born, Southern schools were still not integrated and Neil Armstrong hadn't walked on the moon. On the 60th anniversary of Wood's pastorship Saturday, some 300 faithful gathered to pay tribute to "the man, the mission and the message. " Gov. Martin O'Malley thanked Wood, 92, for his service to Baltimore and his work as a civil rights leader.
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NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1995
The Rev. Marcus Garvey Wood rolled up his sleeves and got down to business. There was a food drive at Providence Baptist Church and the "Rev" was ready to work -- not as a supervisor, but in a job at which he feels more comfortable: bagging.It was a hands-on approach and that's the way it's always been for Mr. Wood during the more than four decades he's been at the church on Pennsylvania Avenue. And it's the same philosophy he's used during his 50 years in the ministry."He's the kind of minister who is always free for you and will work for you," said Essie Leak, a longtime member at the West Baltimore church.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
Domonique Foxworth knows what this story will lead to. He's prepared. Every time someone tries to write about an aspect of his life outside football, there is someone who will read the story and find it infuriating. They'll cite it as an example that he doesn't care enough about his job, because if he did, he would never stop thinking about football. During Foxworth's senior year at Maryland, he got letters from fans suggesting he spend less time reading books and more time watching game film.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 6, 2001
IMAGINE A SCHOOL in an impoverished community. Its students may be African-American, Hispanic or white. But the students at these schools consistently rack up high scores in math and reading. A dream? No, at some schools it's a reality. These would be schools where learning is going on, where students are given standardized tests to measure their progress. These are schools mercifully free of the influence of the Congressional Black Caucus, which four years ago issued a press release containing this sort of drivel: "Widespread misuse of educational testing has disproportionately penalized poor and minority children.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2008
Grammy-winning roots reggae veteran Winston Rodney, better known as Burning Spear, has been making fiery, politically driven music for 35 years. In that time, he has become one of the most revered artists of the genre, illuminating his lyrics with black history and elements of Rastafarianism. On his new album, Jah Is Real, he continues his musical mission of spiritual upliftment and mental expansion. The CD was released Aug. 17, on what would have been the 121th birthday of black nationalist leader Marcus Garvey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | January 21, 2001
ARK CITY, Utah -- The shadow of a labor war. The skewering of "Survivor." And the growth of Drew. If any one theme has emerged in the early going of the Sundance Film Festival, it's that there's no central theme at all. Every year, pundits stretch for a common thread, a punchy sound bite: The Year of the Tarantino Knockoffs. The Parker Posey Festival. Not this time. Independent film is meant to avoid compartmentalization anyway, right? Those who still yearn for a single story line will have to content themselves with several: n Despite the grousing about the big studios' imposing presence, Sundance remains a haven for grass-roots filmmakers.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
Domonique Foxworth knows what this story will lead to. He's prepared. Every time someone tries to write about an aspect of his life outside football, there is someone who will read the story and find it infuriating. They'll cite it as an example that he doesn't care enough about his job, because if he did, he would never stop thinking about football. During Foxworth's senior year at Maryland, he got letters from fans suggesting he spend less time reading books and more time watching game film.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
Domonique Foxworth knows what this story will lead to. He's prepared. Every time someone tries to write about an aspect of his life outside football, there is someone who will read the story and find it infuriating. They'll cite it as an example that he doesn't care enough about his job, because if he did, he would never stop thinking about football. During Foxworth's senior year at Maryland, he got letters from fans suggesting he spend less time reading books and more time watching game film.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
When the Rev. Marcus Garvey Wood started his ministry at Providence Baptist Church in Baltimore, President Barack Obama hadn't yet been born, Southern schools were still not integrated and Neil Armstrong hadn't walked on the moon. On the 60th anniversary of Wood's pastorship Saturday, some 300 faithful gathered to pay tribute to "the man, the mission and the message. " Gov. Martin O'Malley thanked Wood, 92, for his service to Baltimore and his work as a civil rights leader.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg | kevin.vanvalkenburg@baltsun.com | December 25, 2009
Domonique Foxworth knows what this story will lead to. He's prepared. Every time someone tries to write about an aspect of his life outside football, there is someone who will read the story and find it infuriating. They'll cite it as an example that he doesn't care enough about his job, because if he did, he would never stop thinking about football. During Foxworth's senior year at Maryland, he got letters from fans suggesting he spend less time reading books and more time watching game film.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2008
Grammy-winning roots reggae veteran Winston Rodney, better known as Burning Spear, has been making fiery, politically driven music for 35 years. In that time, he has become one of the most revered artists of the genre, illuminating his lyrics with black history and elements of Rastafarianism. On his new album, Jah Is Real, he continues his musical mission of spiritual upliftment and mental expansion. The CD was released Aug. 17, on what would have been the 121th birthday of black nationalist leader Marcus Garvey.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 6, 2001
IMAGINE A SCHOOL in an impoverished community. Its students may be African-American, Hispanic or white. But the students at these schools consistently rack up high scores in math and reading. A dream? No, at some schools it's a reality. These would be schools where learning is going on, where students are given standardized tests to measure their progress. These are schools mercifully free of the influence of the Congressional Black Caucus, which four years ago issued a press release containing this sort of drivel: "Widespread misuse of educational testing has disproportionately penalized poor and minority children.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | January 21, 2001
ARK CITY, Utah -- The shadow of a labor war. The skewering of "Survivor." And the growth of Drew. If any one theme has emerged in the early going of the Sundance Film Festival, it's that there's no central theme at all. Every year, pundits stretch for a common thread, a punchy sound bite: The Year of the Tarantino Knockoffs. The Parker Posey Festival. Not this time. Independent film is meant to avoid compartmentalization anyway, right? Those who still yearn for a single story line will have to content themselves with several: n Despite the grousing about the big studios' imposing presence, Sundance remains a haven for grass-roots filmmakers.
NEWS
August 15, 1999
Marcus Garvey Gillespie, a father of eight who became a substitute teacher at Woodlawn High School after retiring as a carpenter, died of cancer Monday. He was 72.Mr. Gillespie began his career as a forklift operator at Bethlehem Steel, where he worked for 15 years. The longtime Baltimore resident then worked as a carpenter at both the Liberty and Harbor campuses of Baltimore City Community College before retiring in 1993.He is survived by his wife, Kaye Thompson Gillespie; three sons, Marcus G. Gillespie Jr. and Robert Gillespie, both of Delaware, and Rickey Gillespie of North Carolina; and five daughters, Carolyn Gillespie and Rosina Gillespie, both of Baltimore, and Jacqueline Williams, Lenora White and Sylvia Thomas, all of Delaware.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | September 30, 1995
The Rev. Marcus Garvey Wood rolled up his sleeves and got down to business. There was a food drive at Providence Baptist Church and the "Rev" was ready to work -- not as a supervisor, but in a job at which he feels more comfortable: bagging.It was a hands-on approach and that's the way it's always been for Mr. Wood during the more than four decades he's been at the church on Pennsylvania Avenue. And it's the same philosophy he's used during his 50 years in the ministry."He's the kind of minister who is always free for you and will work for you," said Essie Leak, a longtime member at the West Baltimore church.
NEWS
By Paul H. Johnson and Paul H. Johnson,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 17, 2000
HACKENSACK, N.J. -- Artemio Hernandez spends his days by the water. Every afternoon, the wiry and energetic 87-year-old Cuban takes the subway to Battery Park from his Upper West Side home to watch the ships pass by and to admire the Statue of Liberty. "I go there to remember my younger days," said Hernandez, who likes to remember the days when he lived in the South Ferry section of Manhattan 60 years ago, after he first came to the United States as a stowaway, huddled in the hold of a passenger ship.
NEWS
February 5, 2006
Baltimore: Cherry Hill One dead, one hurt in Potee St. shooting A man was killed and another wounded in a shooting early yesterday in the 3800 block of Potee St., police said. Both men were taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where one was declared dead about 5:30 a.m., approximately an hour after the incident. In an unrelated incident, police identified Ricky Medley, 19, as the man killed in a shooting Thursday night. Officers responding to the 900 block of E. Cold Spring Lane found two young men shot inside a damaged vehicle -- one dead and one wounded.
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