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By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 26, 1991
The year is 1999: An astronaut is searching outer space for a new planet to feed the world; the Middle East crisis has been solved by the creation of Saudi-Israel; and Hollywood continues to churn out motion picture epics shot on location with casts of thousands.When John Guare wrote his offbeat comedy, "Marco Polo Sings a Solo," 1999 was 22 years away. A lot of his predictions already sound a bit off, but that doesn't slow down the Bowman Ensemble's production at McDonogh School. Directed by Matthew S. Ramsay, this show is so wonderfully wacky, it's virtually airborne.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 19, 2001
The Italian explorer Marco Polo is said to have named a new type of ceramic he found during his famous travels through China between 1271 and 1295. It reminded him of the smooth whiteness of the cowry shell, which the Italians called porcellana. The history of porcelain -- and Marco Polo's role in discovering it - is charmingly related in Marilyn Stokstad's authoritative book, Art History. Porcelain is made from kaolin, a white clay, and petuntse, a variety of feldspar. When fired at high temperature, the two materials fuse into the glasslike, translucent ceramic we call china.
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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1991
As the 20th century draws to a close, one man dares to break through the prison of his psyche to create a world in which he will thrive at one with nature in John Guare's wildly absurd sociological study, "Marco Polo Sings a Solo," on stage in the UMBC Theatre through Saturday.All things considered, the university's staging of the play is a commendable theater-of-the-absurd presentation.Guare is the author of the tragi-comedy "The House of Blue Leaves" and the current acclaimed "Three Degrees of Separation," now running in New York.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 19, 2001
KASHGAR, China - The first thing you see upon arriving on the edge of the old city in this Silk Road oasis town are clouds of white smoke from wood-burning fires and steam from soup pans, the smoke rising like a curtain over one of Asia's last great open-air markets. As you approach the entrance, a man approaches in a charcoal-gray cap, pushing a wooden cart piled high with ripe apricots. "Get out of the way!" he says in Uigher, the Turkic-Altaic language that dominates Kashgar, a desert outpost at China's far Western frontier.
NEWS
By William D. Montalbano and William D. Montalbano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 1996
LONDON -- Did librarian Frances Wood go too far when she suggested that Marco Polo, one of history's most famous travelers, may not have gone far enough 700 years ago? The thought occurred to her when a distinguished Italian historian sidled up to her at a recent conference and archly predicted, "You will be killed."The trouble began when Wood published a book with a teasing but incendiary title: "Did Marco Polo Go to China?" She thinks he did not, thus challenging one of history's great adventure stories.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 1997
On an August day in 1271, if the story is to be believed, a four-masted ship sailed into the crowded harbor of Zaitun in southeast China, carrying a gray-bearded Italian Jewish trader named Jacob.An account of Jacob's voyage, placing him in China four years before Marco Polo arrived, has surfaced in Italy. It provides extraordinary images of a civilization that was the most dazzling in the world, describing everything from mass-circulation pornography to an early flamethrower. It recounts how Jacob spent six months in Zaitun and became embroiled in Chinese political debates so fierce he had to flee for his life.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 19, 2001
KASHGAR, China - The first thing you see upon arriving on the edge of the old city in this Silk Road oasis town are clouds of white smoke from wood-burning fires and steam from soup pans, the smoke rising like a curtain over one of Asia's last great open-air markets. As you approach the entrance, a man approaches in a charcoal-gray cap, pushing a wooden cart piled high with ripe apricots. "Get out of the way!" he says in Uigher, the Turkic-Altaic language that dominates Kashgar, a desert outpost at China's far Western frontier.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 1, 1991
UMBC to present Guare's 'Marco Polo Sings a Solo'John Guare's futuristic comedy "Marco Polo Sings A Solo" will be presented by the University of Maryland Baltimore County theater department Thursday to Saturday and again Dec. 11-14 in the UMBC Theatre. Curtain time is 8 p.m. Tickets are $8. The absurdist story, set on an iceberg off the coast of Norway in 1999, is about the making of a movie about the Venetian explorer Marco Polo. For more information call (410) 455-2476. Gian Carlo Menotti's one-act Christmas opera, "Amahl and the Night Visitors," kicks off the Baltimore School for the Art's Winter Celebration Friday night at 8 in the school's Schaeffer Ballroom.
FEATURES
By Llewellyn M. Toulmin and Llewellyn M. Toulmin,Special to The Sun | May 22, 1994
As we rounded the Cape of Good Hope, a baby seal applauded. We were a mile off the southwestern tip of Africa, and the sea had just a slight swell coming up from Antarctica and the roaring forties. Beside the ship, a baby seal rolled playfully onto her back and clapped her paws. She seemed to be applauding the climax of our voyage aboard the newly christened M.V. Marco Polo, down the coast from Kenya to Cape Town.The voyage combined a wildlife safari and romantic ports of call with a beautiful vessel, and leaping lemurs with dinners designed by Wolfgang Puck.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | July 25, 1991
The macho image of the heroic Western cowboy is shot down in "The Best Western," a new satirical fantasy by local playwright Matthew Ramsay. Opening tonight, this episodic saga with a cast of 24 is being performed outdoors by the Bowman Ensemble at the Child's Memorial on the grounds of McDonogh School in Owings Mills.The non-profit company is in its second season of repertory theater. In residence at McDonogh School, the Bowman Ensemble is also presenting Carlo Goldoni's 18th century comedy, "The Fan" with a new translation by Center Stage Associate Artistic Director Rick Davis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | June 20, 1999
The bizarre is almost commonplace in John Guare's plays. Consider the stone lions that devour librarians in his one-act play, "A Day for Surprises." Or the sex-change character who, having been inseminated with his own sperm, gets to both father and mother a child in "Marco Polo Sings a Solo."But real life also has a way of creeping into Guare's plays. In 1983, the playwright was having dinner in London with his friends Osborn Elliott, then dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and his wife, Inger, a former photojournalist.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
A bunch of computer geeks just made life easier for Broadneck Senior High School teacher Susan Gallo.At a pat-yourself-on-the-back event that featured the governor, Washington-based MCI announced yesterday the creation of a home page to supplement textbooks and give suggestions for student projects in economics, history, English and other subjects.A visit to the site shows that though MCI's advertising is plentiful, much of the information that the press material boasts about isn't -- at least not yet.The home page, which is called MarcoPolo, links users to Web sites put together by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Council on Economic Education and the National Geographic Society.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 1997
On an August day in 1271, if the story is to be believed, a four-masted ship sailed into the crowded harbor of Zaitun in southeast China, carrying a gray-bearded Italian Jewish trader named Jacob.An account of Jacob's voyage, placing him in China four years before Marco Polo arrived, has surfaced in Italy. It provides extraordinary images of a civilization that was the most dazzling in the world, describing everything from mass-circulation pornography to an early flamethrower. It recounts how Jacob spent six months in Zaitun and became embroiled in Chinese political debates so fierce he had to flee for his life.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1997
The stereotype is that men won't ask directions when they're lost. Instead, with a death grip on the steering wheel and their breath coming in tiny, agitated bursts Yi! Yi! Yi! like an asthmatic Chihuahua, they'll barrel down unfamiliar roads for hours before finally pulling into a gas station somewhere in, say, New Hampshire and asking: "How far's Disney World, partner? Couple miles down the road?" Men say this is a vicious canard. Women say: Just drive with one of these dopes.The good news is that for anyone who is phobic about asking directions, Acura automobiles now offer a state-of-the-art, in-dash navigation system.
NEWS
By William D. Montalbano and William D. Montalbano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 1996
LONDON -- Did librarian Frances Wood go too far when she suggested that Marco Polo, one of history's most famous travelers, may not have gone far enough 700 years ago? The thought occurred to her when a distinguished Italian historian sidled up to her at a recent conference and archly predicted, "You will be killed."The trouble began when Wood published a book with a teasing but incendiary title: "Did Marco Polo Go to China?" She thinks he did not, thus challenging one of history's great adventure stories.
FEATURES
By Llewellyn M. Toulmin and Llewellyn M. Toulmin,Special to The Sun | May 22, 1994
As we rounded the Cape of Good Hope, a baby seal applauded. We were a mile off the southwestern tip of Africa, and the sea had just a slight swell coming up from Antarctica and the roaring forties. Beside the ship, a baby seal rolled playfully onto her back and clapped her paws. She seemed to be applauding the climax of our voyage aboard the newly christened M.V. Marco Polo, down the coast from Kenya to Cape Town.The voyage combined a wildlife safari and romantic ports of call with a beautiful vessel, and leaping lemurs with dinners designed by Wolfgang Puck.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 19, 2001
The Italian explorer Marco Polo is said to have named a new type of ceramic he found during his famous travels through China between 1271 and 1295. It reminded him of the smooth whiteness of the cowry shell, which the Italians called porcellana. The history of porcelain -- and Marco Polo's role in discovering it - is charmingly related in Marilyn Stokstad's authoritative book, Art History. Porcelain is made from kaolin, a white clay, and petuntse, a variety of feldspar. When fired at high temperature, the two materials fuse into the glasslike, translucent ceramic we call china.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | June 20, 1999
The bizarre is almost commonplace in John Guare's plays. Consider the stone lions that devour librarians in his one-act play, "A Day for Surprises." Or the sex-change character who, having been inseminated with his own sperm, gets to both father and mother a child in "Marco Polo Sings a Solo."But real life also has a way of creeping into Guare's plays. In 1983, the playwright was having dinner in London with his friends Osborn Elliott, then dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and his wife, Inger, a former photojournalist.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | December 12, 1991
As the 20th century draws to a close, one man dares to break through the prison of his psyche to create a world in which he will thrive at one with nature in John Guare's wildly absurd sociological study, "Marco Polo Sings a Solo," on stage in the UMBC Theatre through Saturday.All things considered, the university's staging of the play is a commendable theater-of-the-absurd presentation.Guare is the author of the tragi-comedy "The House of Blue Leaves" and the current acclaimed "Three Degrees of Separation," now running in New York.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 1, 1991
UMBC to present Guare's 'Marco Polo Sings a Solo'John Guare's futuristic comedy "Marco Polo Sings A Solo" will be presented by the University of Maryland Baltimore County theater department Thursday to Saturday and again Dec. 11-14 in the UMBC Theatre. Curtain time is 8 p.m. Tickets are $8. The absurdist story, set on an iceberg off the coast of Norway in 1999, is about the making of a movie about the Venetian explorer Marco Polo. For more information call (410) 455-2476. Gian Carlo Menotti's one-act Christmas opera, "Amahl and the Night Visitors," kicks off the Baltimore School for the Art's Winter Celebration Friday night at 8 in the school's Schaeffer Ballroom.
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