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NEWS
June 15, 2008
On June 13, 2008, CATHERINE ANITA MARCIANO, daughter of the late James and Marie Croney Fitch, sister of Charles Fitch. Also survived by caregiver Mary Ann Serio, nieces and nephews. Services and interment will be private. Arrangements are by ECKHARDT FUNERAL CHAPEL P.A., 11605 Reisterstown Road, Owings Mills. If desired memorial contributions may be made to The National Kidney Foundation of Maryland.
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NEWS
June 15, 2008
On June 13, 2008, CATHERINE ANITA MARCIANO, daughter of the late James and Marie Croney Fitch, sister of Charles Fitch. Also survived by caregiver Mary Ann Serio, nieces and nephews. Services and interment will be private. Arrangements are by ECKHARDT FUNERAL CHAPEL P.A., 11605 Reisterstown Road, Owings Mills. If desired memorial contributions may be made to The National Kidney Foundation of Maryland.
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SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 19, 2001
LOST IN the infield without a Preakness horse to bet on? Wandering the grandstand in search of a rooting interest? Ah, fear not. Herewith is The Sun's "Umpteenth Annual Unofficial Betting Guide," designed by the hopeless for use by the hapless. If you're looking for a dose of serious handicapping in hopes of cashing a win ticket on the big race, you're better off reading the Daily Racing Form or eavesdropping on the annoying know-it-all inevitably standing right behind you in line at the betting window.
FEATURES
August 31, 2002
1887: Thomas A. Edison received a patent for his "Kinetoscope," a device which produced moving pictures. 1969: Boxer Rocky Marciano died in a light airplane crash in Iowa, a day before his 46th birthday. 1988: 14 people were killed when a Delta Boeing 727 crashed during takeoff from Dallas-Fort Worth Airport. 1997: Prince Charles escorted the body of his former wife Princess Diana to a Britain that was shocked, grief-stricken and angered by her death in a Paris traffic accident. Associated Press
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2001
Marciano earned a possible spot in the Preakness. Talk Is Money failed again to fulfill early promise. And Burning Roma baffled his jockey and trainer. That was the story of the $200,000 Federico Tesio Stakes yesterday at Pimlico. The race for 3-year-olds featured only four horses after Let's Behave, the New York colt, was scratched. Marciano, the 5-1 third choice, drove powerfully down the stretch to collar the pacesetter Talk Is Money and record a 1 1/4 -length victory. Talk Is Money at 4-1 held on for second as Burning Roma, the 1-5 favorite, weakened in the stretch and finished third.
SPORTS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2001
Marciano delivered a knockout blow to five 3-year-old rivals to win the $50,000 Herat Stakes yesterday at Laurel Park. Marciano, a gray-roan son of Two Punch, and jockey Mark Johnston cruised up outside the pacesetters approaching the far turn, then powered by to score a 9 1/4 -length victory over Unaccountedlea (second) and Dissident Shah (third). The winner, who was the post-time favorite, paid $3.60. His winning time was 1 minute, 46 2/5 seconds for the 1-1/16 mile distance over a wet, fast strip.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
He had won once in eight previous starts and was handily defeated by Triple Crown hopeful Marciano the last time they clashed at Laurel Park. But yesterday was Bay Eagle's turn, as the grandson of Alydar came with a determined rush on the outside to edge the 3-to-5 favorite Marciano by a neck in the $60,450 Private Terms Stakes, the feature at Pimlico Race Course. Bay Eagle covered the 1 1/8 miles over a track rated fast in 1:50 2/5. Jockey Ramon Dominguez craftily saved ground near the back of the pack during the early stages of the race, swung Bay Eagle wide with a quarter-mile remaining, and then engaged in a determined drive against Marciano, who had taken the lead from pace-setting Charlie's Cards after a mile.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
They will remain on the relatively serene grounds of Delaware Park, shipping to Pimlico only a few hours before the Preakness. Then, down I-95 and the Beltway, both will carry the area's hopes of upsetting Kentucky Derby winner Monarchos and the other big-name rivals over a track that has brought them victory. "Maybe we should share a van ride and save the owners some money," said H. Graham Motion, trainer of Lazy Lane Farms' Bay Eagle, whose win in Baltimore came March 31 in the Private Terms Stakes.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2001
The name game in thoroughbred racing is, to some, no big deal. As Dollar Bill's trainer, Dallas Stewart, said, "It's a name, like yours or mine." And yes, every horse has one. But for many, a name is more than a way to identify a horse. To the casual horse racing fan, it can be the deciding factor on which horse to bet. To owners, it's a way to acknowledge the regard they have for bloodlines, or a way to honor a relative. In today's Preakness field, every name has a story. Frank Shipp, president and general manager of Lazy Lane Farms in Upperville, Va., where Preakness entry Bay Eagle was born and raised, said a horse's name is so important a party is sometimes held to name the foals.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2001
The big horse ran his race. Forget the puzzling fifth-place performance in the Kentucky Derby. Forget his second straight post position on the extreme outside. Forget his unruly behavior Friday morning at the stakes barn when Point Given reared on his hind legs and gave everyone a thrill and a tingle. Trainer Bob Baffert said then, "It's his way of telling us he's feeling good, ready to roll." And forget the fooling around the chestnut colt did in the Preakness stretch, gandering into the grandstand and making it difficult for jockey Gary Stevens to change leads.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2001
The big horse ran his race. Forget the puzzling fifth-place performance in the Kentucky Derby. Forget his second straight post position on the extreme outside. Forget his unruly behavior Friday morning at the stakes barn when Point Given reared on his hind legs and gave everyone a thrill and a tingle. Trainer Bob Baffert said then, "It's his way of telling us he's feeling good, ready to roll." And forget the fooling around the chestnut colt did in the Preakness stretch, gandering into the grandstand and making it difficult for jockey Gary Stevens to change leads.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | May 19, 2001
LOST IN the infield without a Preakness horse to bet on? Wandering the grandstand in search of a rooting interest? Ah, fear not. Herewith is The Sun's "Umpteenth Annual Unofficial Betting Guide," designed by the hopeless for use by the hapless. If you're looking for a dose of serious handicapping in hopes of cashing a win ticket on the big race, you're better off reading the Daily Racing Form or eavesdropping on the annoying know-it-all inevitably standing right behind you in line at the betting window.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2001
The name game in thoroughbred racing is, to some, no big deal. As Dollar Bill's trainer, Dallas Stewart, said, "It's a name, like yours or mine." And yes, every horse has one. But for many, a name is more than a way to identify a horse. To the casual horse racing fan, it can be the deciding factor on which horse to bet. To owners, it's a way to acknowledge the regard they have for bloodlines, or a way to honor a relative. In today's Preakness field, every name has a story. Frank Shipp, president and general manager of Lazy Lane Farms in Upperville, Va., where Preakness entry Bay Eagle was born and raised, said a horse's name is so important a party is sometimes held to name the foals.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
They will remain on the relatively serene grounds of Delaware Park, shipping to Pimlico only a few hours before the Preakness. Then, down I-95 and the Beltway, both will carry the area's hopes of upsetting Kentucky Derby winner Monarchos and the other big-name rivals over a track that has brought them victory. "Maybe we should share a van ride and save the owners some money," said H. Graham Motion, trainer of Lazy Lane Farms' Bay Eagle, whose win in Baltimore came March 31 in the Private Terms Stakes.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2001
Marciano earned a possible spot in the Preakness. Talk Is Money failed again to fulfill early promise. And Burning Roma baffled his jockey and trainer. That was the story of the $200,000 Federico Tesio Stakes yesterday at Pimlico. The race for 3-year-olds featured only four horses after Let's Behave, the New York colt, was scratched. Marciano, the 5-1 third choice, drove powerfully down the stretch to collar the pacesetter Talk Is Money and record a 1 1/4 -length victory. Talk Is Money at 4-1 held on for second as Burning Roma, the 1-5 favorite, weakened in the stretch and finished third.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 1, 2001
He had won once in eight previous starts and was handily defeated by Triple Crown hopeful Marciano the last time they clashed at Laurel Park. But yesterday was Bay Eagle's turn, as the grandson of Alydar came with a determined rush on the outside to edge the 3-to-5 favorite Marciano by a neck in the $60,450 Private Terms Stakes, the feature at Pimlico Race Course. Bay Eagle covered the 1 1/8 miles over a track rated fast in 1:50 2/5. Jockey Ramon Dominguez craftily saved ground near the back of the pack during the early stages of the race, swung Bay Eagle wide with a quarter-mile remaining, and then engaged in a determined drive against Marciano, who had taken the lead from pace-setting Charlie's Cards after a mile.
SPORTS
March 31, 2001
Triple Crown nominee Marciano headlines a field of eight for the $75,000 Private Terms Stakes at Pimlico Race Course today. The $60,000 Gala Lil Stakes tomorrow features Irving's Baby, winner of three stakes during the recently completed Laurel Park winter meeting. Both races are at 1 1/8 miles at Old Hilltop. Today, the first 4,000 full paid admissions will receive a Pimlico T-shirt. Post time both days is 1:05 p.m. The Pimlico Pick 4 continues this weekend with a guaranteed net pool of $25,000.
SPORTS
By Bob Pickering | January 20, 2001
Today Case of the Blues, a daughter of In Case which has won several stakes locally, returns from vacation to face seven other fillies and mares in the Nellie Morse Stakes. The Tony Dutrow-trained mare is the likely favorite for the 19th running of the $75,000, 1 1/16-mile affair. During her 2000 campaign, Case of the Blues reeled off four straight victories in added-money events before failing at long odds in the Grade 2 Black-Eyed Susan Stakes at Pimlico. Her chief opposition is likely to come from Prized Stamp, winner of two recent outings vs. high-priced claimers, or Sheldons Jet. Sheldons Jet hasn't raced since last July, when she completed her campaign by winning three straight.
SPORTS
March 31, 2001
Triple Crown nominee Marciano headlines a field of eight for the $75,000 Private Terms Stakes at Pimlico Race Course today. The $60,000 Gala Lil Stakes tomorrow features Irving's Baby, winner of three stakes during the recently completed Laurel Park winter meeting. Both races are at 1 1/8 miles at Old Hilltop. Today, the first 4,000 full paid admissions will receive a Pimlico T-shirt. Post time both days is 1:05 p.m. The Pimlico Pick 4 continues this weekend with a guaranteed net pool of $25,000.
SPORTS
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 26, 2001
Marciano delivered a knockout blow to five 3-year-old rivals to win the $50,000 Herat Stakes yesterday at Laurel Park. Marciano, a gray-roan son of Two Punch, and jockey Mark Johnston cruised up outside the pacesetters approaching the far turn, then powered by to score a 9 1/4 -length victory over Unaccountedlea (second) and Dissident Shah (third). The winner, who was the post-time favorite, paid $3.60. His winning time was 1 minute, 46 2/5 seconds for the 1-1/16 mile distance over a wet, fast strip.
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