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Marcia Talley

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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 30, 2001
It's not hard to imagine a dozen or more people pooling their talent to solve a murder. But how about a baker's dozen worth of authors writing about one, together in the same volume? It's not as impossible as it sounds. Naked Came the Phoenix - a whodunit just published by St. Martin's Press of New York City - boasts no fewer than 13 female authors, each of whom contributed a chapter to the funny, feisty 258-page book. Overseeing the project was Marcia Talley of Annapolis, the Naval Academy librarian turned mystery writer whose Dell Paperback novels featuring super-sleuth Hannah Ives have won her a wide readership among lovers of the murder mystery genre.
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NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 1, 2014
Glancing out the windows of Sujata Massey's house on an early spring day, you could be on a quiet street anywhere, in Japan, or India, or Minneapolis, Minn. Massey shares a bond with all of those places, but her heart and home are in the Roland Park area. She lives near Roland Avenue, in Tuxedo Park. An Indian tablecloth graces Massey's dining room table, where the award-wining author and former reporter - best known for her series of mystery novels set in Japan featuring sleuth Rei Shimura - does most of her writing.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2003
To most of us, Edgar, Agatha and Anthony are colorful and evocative first names. But to writers of "whodunits" - the murder-mystery novels and stories that captivate readers in search of puzzles and thrills - The Edgar, The Agatha and The Anthony comprise a Triple Crown of literary recognition. Each is a prestigious award bestowed on a few select writers for their mastery of the murder-mystery genre. When The Agatha (named for mystery writer par excellence, Dame Agatha Christie) and The Anthony (which honors long-time New York Times literary critic Anthony Boucher)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2004
Writing is normally a solitary pursuit, and so it is for Marcia Talley, one of the Annapolis area's renowned authors of murder mysteries, when she's meshing the minutiae of character and plot in the successful Hannah Ives detective series she writes for Morrow/Avon Publishers. Now, however, Talley has teamed up with 12 other novelists - all female, and all practitioners of the mystery genre - to whip up a spicy, witty whodunit for St. Martin's Minotaur Press called I'd Kill for That. Like Naked Came the Phoenix, the first serial novel Talley edited, I'd Kill for That was composed round-robin style, one chapter per author - a process that plainly tickles the editor.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2000
Last August, Marcia Talley was a fledgling author whose first book, a "whodunit" titled "Sing It To Her Bones," had been picked up by Dell Publishing and was about to hit the bookstore shelves. Ten months, three printings and 30,000 sold copies later, Talley, 57, is poised for the release of her second Dell Mystery, titled "Unbreathed Memories." "I'm kind of stunned," says the resident of the Gingerville community, just south of Annapolis. "You always hope for the best, but this really has exceeded my expectations."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 2004
Writing is normally a solitary pursuit, and so it is for Marcia Talley, one of the Annapolis area's renowned authors of murder mysteries, when she's meshing the minutiae of character and plot in the successful Hannah Ives detective series she writes for Morrow/Avon Publishers. Now, however, Talley has teamed up with 12 other novelists - all female, and all practitioners of the mystery genre - to whip up a spicy, witty whodunit for St. Martin's Minotaur Press called I'd Kill for That. Like Naked Came the Phoenix, the first serial novel Talley edited, I'd Kill for That was composed round-robin style, one chapter per author - a process that plainly tickles the editor.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 1, 2014
Glancing out the windows of Sujata Massey's house on an early spring day, you could be on a quiet street anywhere, in Japan, or India, or Minneapolis, Minn. Massey shares a bond with all of those places, but her heart and home are in the Roland Park area. She lives near Roland Avenue, in Tuxedo Park. An Indian tablecloth graces Massey's dining room table, where the award-wining author and former reporter - best known for her series of mystery novels set in Japan featuring sleuth Rei Shimura - does most of her writing.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 30, 2001
It's not hard to imagine a dozen or more people pooling their talent to solve a murder. But how about a baker's dozen worth of authors writing about one, together in the same volume? It's not as impossible as it sounds. Naked Came the Phoenix - a whodunit just published by St. Martin's Press of New York City - boasts no fewer than 13 female authors, each of whom contributed a chapter to the funny, feisty 258-page book. Overseeing the project was Marcia Talley of Annapolis, the Naval Academy librarian turned mystery writer whose Dell Paperback novels featuring super-sleuth Hannah Ives have won her a wide readership among lovers of the murder mystery genre.
NEWS
December 2, 2007
Notes For Laura Lippman fans: The most common refrain among mystery readers who scarf down the backlist of a favorite author is, "Who else writes books like this?" For those who have made their way through the complete works of Charm City's signature mystery writer, the refrain's answer is Jennifer McMahon, author of Promise Not To Tell (HarperPaperbacks/ 240 pages/ $13.95). Similar to Lippman's breakthrough standalone novel What the Dead Know, the inciting force is a decades-old disappearance of a young girl dredged back into a town's collective consciousness with the return of a long-absent stranger.
NEWS
February 7, 2014
Monday, Feb. 10 Photo club The Digital Photography Club of Annapolis meets at 7 p.m. at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St. in Annapolis. Guest speaker will be Jay Fleming. Information: 410-267-0461 or digitalphotoclub.net. Tuesday, Feb. 11 Lecture Join historian Anthony Cohen as he recounts his journey retracing the route of the Underground Railroad from Maryland to Canada, held at 6 p.m. at Historic Annapolis, 18 Pickney St. Admission is $10, $8 for Historic Annapolis members and volunteers.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 30, 2003
To most of us, Edgar, Agatha and Anthony are colorful and evocative first names. But to writers of "whodunits" - the murder-mystery novels and stories that captivate readers in search of puzzles and thrills - The Edgar, The Agatha and The Anthony comprise a Triple Crown of literary recognition. Each is a prestigious award bestowed on a few select writers for their mastery of the murder-mystery genre. When The Agatha (named for mystery writer par excellence, Dame Agatha Christie) and The Anthony (which honors long-time New York Times literary critic Anthony Boucher)
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 30, 2001
It's not hard to imagine a dozen or more people pooling their talent to solve a murder. But how about a baker's dozen worth of authors writing about one, together in the same volume? It's not as impossible as it sounds. Naked Came the Phoenix - a whodunit just published by St. Martin's Press of New York City - boasts no fewer than 13 female authors, each of whom contributed a chapter to the funny, feisty 258-page book. Overseeing the project was Marcia Talley of Annapolis, the Naval Academy librarian turned mystery writer whose Dell Paperback novels featuring super-sleuth Hannah Ives have won her a wide readership among lovers of the murder mystery genre.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 22, 2000
Last August, Marcia Talley was a fledgling author whose first book, a "whodunit" titled "Sing It To Her Bones," had been picked up by Dell Publishing and was about to hit the bookstore shelves. Ten months, three printings and 30,000 sold copies later, Talley, 57, is poised for the release of her second Dell Mystery, titled "Unbreathed Memories." "I'm kind of stunned," says the resident of the Gingerville community, just south of Annapolis. "You always hope for the best, but this really has exceeded my expectations."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 5, 1999
In times less politically correct than our own, we'd have described Hannah Ives as one "tough cookie."A breast cancer survivor estranged from her only daughter, fired from her job, forced to sit by as her husband, a Naval Academy professor, is embroiled in a very public controversy, yet still possessing the wherewithal to head down to South County and solve an 8-year-old murder.Hannah, you may have guessed, is a fictional character. But her creator, Marcia Talley of the Gingerville community just south of Annapolis, is an equally feisty soul; a Naval Academy systems librarian and breast cancer survivor who, at 56, is poised to see her first novel hit bookstore shelves Tuesday.
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