Advertisement
HomeCollectionsMarcia Clark
IN THE NEWS

Marcia Clark

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | March 5, 1995
My mother calls her "Marcia," and talks about her with the same familiarity she uses to catch me up on the doings of the daughter of an old neighbor.As in: "Did you see Marcia's hair is different?"Like many immersed in the spectacle of the O. J. Simpson trial, my mother is talking about prosecutor Marcia Clark. It is "F. Lee Bailey" and "Johnnie Cochran" and "Robert Shapiro." But for the state's lead lawyer, it is "Marcia."Like everyone else, my mother comments on her style and her suits, and wonders how she's managing her two little kids during the trial.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF Sun intern Eileen Canning contributed to this article | May 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It's Thursday, day four of the Marcia Clark book tour, and the author can barely stay awake for a national radio broadcast. At the WAMU studios, she dozes before going on the air and has to stifle a yawn to say good morning to talk show host Diane Rehm.A cross-country trek to tout "Without a Doubt (Viking, $25.95)," the last book out of the chute by a major player in the O. J. Simpson circus, is the price you pay for a $4.2 million book contract. But that doesn't mean you have to enjoy it.For that matter, Clark has appeared to enjoy little of her uninvited celebrity.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF Sun intern Eileen Canning contributed to this article | May 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- It's Thursday, day four of the Marcia Clark book tour, and the author can barely stay awake for a national radio broadcast. At the WAMU studios, she dozes before going on the air and has to stifle a yawn to say good morning to talk show host Diane Rehm.A cross-country trek to tout "Without a Doubt (Viking, $25.95)," the last book out of the chute by a major player in the O. J. Simpson circus, is the price you pay for a $4.2 million book contract. But that doesn't mean you have to enjoy it.For that matter, Clark has appeared to enjoy little of her uninvited celebrity.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 1997
A lot's happening tonight, including the conclusion of the "Knots Landing" reunion miniseries, a Barbara Walters interview with Marcia Clark and the first half of a two-part "Homicide: Life on the Street" season finale. "Family Matters" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Tonight's the last night for Jaleel White as Urkel -- but only on ABC, where he goes out with a 3-D blast. Next season, Urkel and "Family Matters" resurface, in the same time slot, on CBS -- part of that network's plan to build its own kid-friendly "T.G.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1995
The tabloid headline said it all, summing up in just four words the child custody case that has grabbed the attention of working mothers everywhere: "BAD MOM, GOOD PROSECUTOR."It seems that Marcia Clark, the O. J. Simpson prosecutor, has been put on trial by her soon-to-be-ex-husband, Gordon Clark, for spending too much time working and not enough time with the kids. The custody battle has struck a nerve in working mothers everywhere, prompting responses ranging from fear to rage. Along with several other recent court rulings, the Marcia Clark case has alarmed working mothers who are beginning to fear they may have to choose between their child and their job.And such fears may have some foundation, say those who study gender and child custody.
NEWS
January 24, 1995
FROM a profile of Marcia Clark, the Los Angelos County deputy district attorney leading the prosecution in the murder trial of O.J. Simpson:"For all the media's fawning over Simpson's 'dream team' of defense lawyers, and for all the public hostility toward Clark, she is winning. The public reception accorded Clark might well serve as a case study of what happens when a woman becomes dramatically visible in a job traditionally associated with men. On the one hand, she has been patronized: [Defense Attorney Robert]
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Writer | January 19, 1995
All rise, or at least turn on your television sets: People of the State of California vs. Orenthal James Simpson will now come to order.Mr. Simpson's long-delayed trial on charges of murdering his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman is scheduled to begin today. But the case has been under way for months in the court of public opinion, that highly irregular place where rumors and outright falsehoods can carry as much weight as actual exhibits and testimony in a real courtroom.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | March 6, 1995
At the risk of siding with the Neanderthals, I'd like to take the position that it's possible for a man to be right in a child custody case.If it pleases the court, we'll introduce as evidence the Marcia Clark case.Marcia Clark, as everyone knows, is the hard-working, tough-talking lead prosecutor in the O. J. Simpson trial. She's tough, she's smart, she's hard, she's soft, she's got that beguiling mole above her lip. In other words, she's a woman for the '90s.And now her soon-to-be-ex-husband says he wants primary custody of their two kids -- ages 5 and 3 -- because she's hardly ever home, whereas he's home every night at 6:15.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 9, 1997
A lot's happening tonight, including the conclusion of the "Knots Landing" reunion miniseries, a Barbara Walters interview with Marcia Clark and the first half of a two-part "Homicide: Life on the Street" season finale. "Family Matters" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Tonight's the last night for Jaleel White as Urkel -- but only on ABC, where he goes out with a 3-D blast. Next season, Urkel and "Family Matters" resurface, in the same time slot, on CBS -- part of that network's plan to build its own kid-friendly "T.G.
FEATURES
By Bettina Boxall and Bettina Boxall,Los Angeles Times | March 3, 1995
Los Angeles -- Her prosecution of O. J. Simpson has made her one of the best-known working mothers in America, and now it has landed Marcia Clark in a bitter custody battle with her estranged husband, who contends that her grueling workload is harming their two young sons.In court papers recently filed in their divorce case, Gordon Clark argues that he should be given primary custody of their children because his estranged wife, with whom the boys live, is rarely home these days.At most, he contends, Marcia Clark sees their sons, ages 3 and 5, an hour a day during the week.
FEATURES
April 1, 1996
Harvard professor admires 'Aphrodite' for her brainsMira, Mira, in Harvard halls . . . who's the fairest among the ivy-covered walls?Mira Sorvino, who won the best supporting actress Oscar last week for her role in "Mighty Aphrodite," may be, says a professor at her alma mater in Cambridge, Mass.Her thesis on race relations between Chinese and African exchange students was extraordinary, professor Peter Bol, a specialist in Chinese history, told the New York Daily News."It was regarded as publishable," he said.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 8, 1995
Both sides in the O. J. Simpson case have made plenty of mistakes.But whether she wins or loses (and who's kidding whom about whether Simpson is going to walk), Prosecutor Marcia Clark is not going to look back with much pride on how she handled Mark Fuhrman's invocation of this Fifth Amendment rights on Wednesday.There is, before we begin, one thing we should keep in mindabout the Fifth Amendment: It is a constitutional right. It is your right, my right, Mark Fuhrman's right and O. J. Simpson's right.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 27, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- For 25 years, Arlene Parness waited for her big break. She danced with a cow in a milk commercial, played a corpse in the movie "Outbreak," and stood around in crowd shots on the television show Models Inc. She passed her photo out to dozens of casting agents, always hoping for the role that would make her a star.But no one was much interested. Until Marcia Clark hit the scene.Now, the struggling actress, who bears an uncanny resemblance to the famous prosecutor in the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial, is getting more work -- and attention -- than she ever imagined.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | March 24, 1995
Boston -- The Monday morning TV segment ended with a dismally familiar question: Can women have it all? The subject was again Marcia Clark, the woman whose work hours and custody dispute have received more attention these last weeks than anything except O.J. Simpson's swollen finger.As often happens on television, Harry Smith had asked an essay question with time only for a multiple-choice answer. Before I conjured up a yes-no-maybe, time was up.On my way back to the office, I tuned in to a radio debate about another woman -- the welfare mother.
NEWS
By Roger Simon and Roger Simon,Sun Columnist | March 16, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- O. J. Simpson is zoning out.He is doing his Forrest Gump routine. He sits in his blue chair behind the defense table and stares straight ahead at the space above the American flag on the wall opposite him.He purses his lips, tenses his cheek muscles, grimaces and lets out this very soft sigh.He does this again and again.Of the many things that have been said of O. J. Simpson -- that he is a kind, gentle, innocent, violent, brutal and guilty man -- nobody has ever accused him of being interested in long hours of legal proceedings.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1995
The tabloid headline said it all, summing up in just four words the child custody case that has grabbed the attention of working mothers everywhere: "BAD MOM, GOOD PROSECUTOR."It seems that Marcia Clark, the O. J. Simpson prosecutor, has been put on trial by her soon-to-be-ex-husband, Gordon Clark, for spending too much time working and not enough time with the kids. The custody battle has struck a nerve in working mothers everywhere, prompting responses ranging from fear to rage. Along with several other recent court rulings, the Marcia Clark case has alarmed working mothers who are beginning to fear they may have to choose between their child and their job.And such fears may have some foundation, say those who study gender and child custody.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 21, 1994
Boston -- Mr. Blackwell wants to share his years of collected wisdom with the folks on the O.J. Simpson case. This week, the man who churns out Hollywood's Worst Dressed List had some advice for Deputy District Attorney Marcia Clark.''She has to stop wearing white.''''She needs to bring her hem to just above the knee.''In the best legal opinion of this one-man jury of good and bad taste, if Marcia just gets the skirt a teeny-weeny bit longer, she'll be more likely to get a guilty verdict.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 27, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- For 25 years, Arlene Parness waited for her big break. She danced with a cow in a milk commercial, played a corpse in the movie "Outbreak," and stood around in crowd shots on the television show Models Inc. She passed her photo out to dozens of casting agents, always hoping for the role that would make her a star.But no one was much interested. Until Marcia Clark hit the scene.Now, the struggling actress, who bears an uncanny resemblance to the famous prosecutor in the O.J. Simpson double-murder trial, is getting more work -- and attention -- than she ever imagined.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1995
One night on the 11 o'clock news:11:00: Breezy opening theme. Splashy photo montage of city skyline interspersed with footage of Instant Action News team at work: anchorman in shirt sleeves striding confidently through the newsroom, anchorwoman typing furiously at computer, weatherman poring over charts, sports guy interviewing star point guard on basketball team.Horns rise to crescendo. Off-camera voice of God intones: "This is Instant Action News!"11:01: Uh-oh, anchorman looks grim. There's been a shooting.
NEWS
By Russell Baker | March 8, 1995
AFTER MANY years of watching the most widely celebrated trial in human history, I slipped quietly into a coma. Johnnie Cochran objected. I was deeply flattered.Johnnie Cochran was the most brilliant defense attorney to put a leaden thumb on the scales of justice since Socrates argued his own case. Now he was objecting to my very own coma. Surely there were rich book possibilities here.Judge Lance Ito dealt summarily with him. "Cochran," said Judge Ito, "go eat your prunes." Marcia Clark objected that it was unfair to give dietary advice to the defense.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.