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April 25, 2004
On April 23, 2004, MARY JACQEMARCHIONE (nee Peck); beloved wife of Anthony G. Marchione, Ph.D; devoted mother of Kelly Brauer, Mark Marchione, Beth Schlimme and Amy Pearson; dear sister of Helen Stahl; loving aunt of Amber and Joshua Stahl. The family will receive friends at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Rd (at beltway exit 26A), on Sunday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated in the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Towson, Md on Monday at 10 A.M. Entombment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 6, 2011
Rose P. Marchione, a retired seamstress who had worked at Stewart's department store and Towson University, died May 31 of complications from an infection at the Charlestown retirement community. She was 100. Rose Patacca, the daughter of Italian immigrants, was born in Dennison, Ohio. In 1912, she moved with her family to Giulianova, Italy, and her father served in the Italian army during World War I. Educated in Italy, she moved in 1929 with her family to Philadelphia.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Marego Athans contributed to this article | March 13, 1996
The Baltimore County school board last night approved a four-year contract for Anthony G. Marchione.Dr. Marchione, 64, was named superintendent of the 102,000-student district last week. He served as interim superintendent after the board bought out the contract of former Superintendent Stuart D. Berger for $300,000 last summer.Dr. Marchione already is forging more cordial working relationships than his predecessor.Earlier yesterday, he briefed the County Council on his proposed budget in an atmosphere free of the acrimony that characterized previous meetings between the council and school officials.
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporter | November 15, 2006
The man who oversees the day-to-day operation of the Baltimore County government said yesterday that he will resign by the end of the year. County Administrative Officer Anthony G. Marchione, 74, said he made it clear when he took the job in 2003 that he planned to retire after County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s first term. He said he wants to travel and spend more time at his house on North Carolina's Outer Banks. "I know what it feels like to not have a full-time job, and I'm looking forward to doing those things," said Marchione, a former teacher and school administrator.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
Mary Jacqe Marchione, a well-known Baltimore County educator, died of cancer Friday at her Hunt Valley home. She was 59. Born Mary Jacqe Peck in Danville, Va., she grew up in Baltimore. She earned a bachelor of arts and a master of education degree from Towson University and did postgraduate work at Loyola College in Baltimore. Her husband, Anthony G. Marchione, is a former Baltimore County school superintendent who holds the No. 2 position in county government as county administrative officer.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1999
Hoping to take advantage of the governor's plans to reduce class size, Baltimore County schools Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione proposed last night adding 50 math and reading teachers to next year's budget.Marchione also added 23 special education teachers to his spending plan for 1999-2000, which means that his proposed budget has 168 more classroom positions than this year's budget.The proposals were made at the start of the school board's work session on the operating budget for next year.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | August 9, 1995
At his first Baltimore County school board meeting as interim superintendent, Anthony G. Marchione got approval for several administrative changes and named an ethics committee to look into school system practices on gifts and trips paid for by vendors soliciting business.In what he said was a "slight realignment" of administrators, Dr. Marchione promoted Robert H. Chapman III from associate superintendent to acting deputy superintendent, the position he had held until last week.He also promoted Michael Riley from area superintendent to acting associate superintendent for administration and instruction.
NEWS
August 24, 1999
IN FOUR YEARS as head of Baltimore County schools, Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione accomplished much more than simply restoring calm to a system that had been roiled by change and controversy.Student achievement is improving and the gap between African-American and white students is narrowing. Dr. Marchione can take pride in accomplishing the goals he set when the school board removed the word "interim" from his title in March 1996. He was appointed to succeed the deposed Stuart Berger after serving as deputy superintendent for 12 years under Dr. Berger and Robert Y. Dubel.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2000
The Baltimore County Board of Education approved minor changes in the school system's standardized testing schedule and set the 2001-2002 school year calendar at a meeting last night, the last for Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione, who will retire June 30. At the meeting, the board presented Marchione, who has worked as a teacher and administrator in Baltimore County for 45 years, with a portrait of the superintendent that will hang at school system...
NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun Reporter | November 15, 2006
The man who oversees the day-to-day operation of the Baltimore County government said yesterday that he will resign by the end of the year. County Administrative Officer Anthony G. Marchione, 74, said he made it clear when he took the job in 2003 that he planned to retire after County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s first term. He said he wants to travel and spend more time at his house on North Carolina's Outer Banks. "I know what it feels like to not have a full-time job, and I'm looking forward to doing those things," said Marchione, a former teacher and school administrator.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
Mary Jacqe Marchione, a well-known Baltimore County educator, died of cancer Friday at her Hunt Valley home. She was 59. Born Mary Jacqe Peck in Danville, Va., she grew up in Baltimore. She earned a bachelor of arts and a master of education degree from Towson University and did postgraduate work at Loyola College in Baltimore. Her husband, Anthony G. Marchione, is a former Baltimore County school superintendent who holds the No. 2 position in county government as county administrative officer.
NEWS
April 25, 2004
On April 23, 2004, MARY JACQEMARCHIONE (nee Peck); beloved wife of Anthony G. Marchione, Ph.D; devoted mother of Kelly Brauer, Mark Marchione, Beth Schlimme and Amy Pearson; dear sister of Helen Stahl; loving aunt of Amber and Joshua Stahl. The family will receive friends at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Rd (at beltway exit 26A), on Sunday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated in the Church of the Immaculate Conception, Towson, Md on Monday at 10 A.M. Entombment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2003
Baltimore County public safety union officials argued yesterday for amendments to a County Council bill authorizing binding arbitration for their members that would allow arbitrators to consider more factors in making their decisions. Specifically, the unions want the arbitrators to be allowed to consider salaries and working conditions of public safety workers in Montgomery and Prince George's counties and to look at the county's reserve funds, not just its annual tax receipts, in deciding on contract provisions for police, fire fighters and emergency medical personnel.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2003
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s last four nominees for top county posts slid through their confirmation hearings yesterday with no tough questions from the County Council, suggesting six months of often testy relations over the executive's appointees may soon come to a close. Smith's first pick for the county's No. 2 post withdrew her name from consideration rather than face a nasty confirmation hearing. But yesterday, when the County Council interviewed the executive's new nominee, former Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione, the toughest question they asked was how the job would affect his golf game.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2003
Anthony G. Marchione looks like he'll have the distinction of being the right person at the right time for Baltimore County -- twice. After three years of strained relations between the school system and county government, Marchione, then a 40-year veteran teacher and administrator, became superintendent in 1995. Almost immediately, the conflict stopped. Eight years later, amid the testiest relations between Baltimore County's branches of government in at least a decade, County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s young administration was dealt a severe blow when his pick for the county's No. 2 post withdrew her name from consideration after it became clear that she might not be confirmed.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
After his first choice for Baltimore County's No. 2 post withdrew amid complaints that she had no knowledge of the county or its politics, Executive James T. Smith Jr. nominated yesterday a consummate insider for administrative officer: former schools Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione. The nomination met with universal acclaim in the County Council. All seven members said they know Marchione well and had a good working relationship with him in the past. Several said they expect he will have no problems winning confirmation.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN STAFF | February 27, 1996
Leaders of the Baltimore County NAACP said yesterday they vehemently oppose the candidacy of interim schools Superintendent Anthony G. Marchione as the next chief of the 102,000-student district.Chapter Vice President Bernetha George criticized Dr. Marchione -- a 40-year veteran of the county's public schools -- as part of a system that had long neglected black children and produced persistent achievement gaps along racial lines."The record of African-American students during his tenure is dismal," Dr. George said at a Catonsville news conference.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 8, 1998
Anthony G. Marchione was hired as permanent superintendent of Baltimore County's schools two years ago to bring a steadying hand to a district in turmoil.Today, the unassuming 66-year-old educator is given high marks for restoring calm and instilling confidence, reaching out to teachers, parents and students who felt they had been shut out and ignored.Administrators no longer joke about learning of major new initiatives by listening to the radio as they drive on the Beltway. Parents say their concerns are heard.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2001
A buoyant economy has allowed C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger to wear two hats during much of his administration: fiscal conservative and education champion. But as he prepares his seventh budget as Baltimore County executive, one of those hats is in danger of slipping off. The county Board of Education sent Ruppersberger a request this week for $643 million in county funds for next year's budget, without making $20 million in cuts the executive had asked for. Ruppersberger will have to make the trims, something he pledges to do to stay within a self-imposed limit.
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